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Category: Books (1-10 of 161)

Hopeful Y.A. franchise 'Seeker' gets screenwriter

Throw a teenage girl into a dystopian adventure and Hollywood will come calling — in this case, even before the book is officially published.

Hollywood already has adaptations of Daughter Of Smoke And Bone and The Fifth Wave in the works, and today Sony confirmed they have hired a screenwriter, Callie Kloves, for Seeker, an upcoming sci-fi/adventure tale based on a book by Arwen Elys Dayton that hasn’t even been published yet. (It’s expected to be released in 2015.) READ FULL STORY

Wally Lamb's 'Wishin' and Hopin' is headed to the big screen

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For the first time ever, Wally Lamb is getting the big screen treatment! Lamb’s bestseller Wishin’ and Hopin’ is being made into a feature film set to shoot in Connecticut this summer.

With a screenplay written by John Doolan, Wishin’ and Hopin’ is a Christmas story set in the 1960s in the fictional town of Three Rivers, Connecticut, and more specifically, St. Aloysius Gonzaga Parochial School. The book follows a young boy, Felix, as he attends Catholic school and learns about life and culture from a Russian student and a substitute teacher, among others.

The film will be directed by Colin Theys. Lamb is on board as an executive producer.

Chloe Grace Moretz will be killing aliens in 'The 5th Wave'

Sony Pictures announced that they officially inked the deal with Chloe Grace Moretz to play Cassie in the film adaptation of Rick Yancey’s The 5th Wave. Relative newcomer J Blakeson will direct, but veteran Susannah Grant will write the adapted screenplay  (Erin Brockovich; The Soloist). After the world has been destroyed by four waves of brutal alien invasions, a young girl named Cassie is desperately trying to save her little brother before the inevitable “5th wave” of attacks. On her journey she meets a boy who may be her only hope of survival. READ FULL STORY

Michael C. Hall and director Jim Mickle talk 'Cold in July' -- EXCLUSIVE IMAGE

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In the opening scenes of the new ’80s-set thriller Cold in July, Michael C. Hall’s character shoots dead a burglar and then checks out his funeral. Did the man who played the serial killer Dexter and a funeral director on Six Feet Under think he was being pranked when he first read the screenplay? Not so much. As Hall says in the currently-on-stands Summer Movie Preview issue of Entertainment Weekly, “I’m often sent scripts that have some murderous or graveyard elements.”

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'Divergent' worked. Now what?

All hail Divergent! A collective sigh of relief emanated from the halls of Hollywood this past weekend when the latest attempt to score with young female moviegoers worked with the successful $55 million debut of the post-apocalyptic film Divergent. And it’s not just the studio executives at Summit Entertainment who are breathing a sigh of relief as they ready the next two movies in the trilogy based on Veronica Roth’s young adult novels. The exhale also comes from those in Hollywood who had been working on a host of teen-centric adaptations last year amid the troubling trend that saw any project not called The Hunger Games flop, including Beautiful Creatures, The Mortal Instruments, and Stephenie Meyer’s The Host. READ FULL STORY

'The Giver' trailer: Meryl Streep! Jeff Bridges! Color?! VIDEO

So this is how you finally make a movie of The Giver after more than 15 years of development hell: By aging up the characters, adding in awesome body-snatching spaceships, and setting the whole thing to a pounding score straight out of the Dystopian YA Handbook.

Lois Lowry’s classic story — one of the first modern dystopic tales written explicitly for a younger audience — takes place in a future where all of the unpleasant, messy aspects of life (war, pain, difference, feelings in general) have been wiped away. (In the book, even the concept of color has been erased… but perhaps because they feared scaring off today’s teens with black-and-white scenes, The Giver‘s team seems to have elected to ignore that part.)

Its main character is Jonas (newly turned 12 in the book, but here played by strapping 24-year-old Aussie Brenton Thwaites), a boy who is chosen to become the community’s new Receiver of Memory — the only person who can recall what life was like before Sameness descended. But as Jonas begins his training under the outgoing Receiver — a.k.a. The Giver (Jeff Bridges, who also produced the film) — he realizes everything his people lost when they elected to soften the world’s hard edges… and decides to take drastic action to change things for good.

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Mick Jagger! Orson Welles! Giant worms! Check out the trailer for 'Jodorowsky's Dune' -- VIDEO

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Would you see a big-budget adaptation of Frank Herbert’s classic sci-fi novel Dune directed by genius-madman Alejandro Jodorowsky and starring Mick Jagger, Orson Welles, and Salvador Dali?

So would I — but, alas, we never will. In the mid-’70s, Hollywood studios declined to finance just such a project after Jodorowsky spent a couple of years prepping the movie with a band of hugely gifted artists including future Alien creators H.R. Giger and Dan O’Bannon. (In fairness to the studio execs, they may have been justifiably reluctant to invest in a project which Jodorowsky himself believed might be as many as 20 hours long).

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'Catfish' directors to adapt Jeanne Ryan's 'Nerve'

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Directing duo Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman — the team behind the documentary film Catfish — have a lot of nerve. (Get it?)

EW has confirmed that the duo will direct an upcoming adaptation of Nerve, Jeanne Ryan’s hit YA novel, for Lionsgate. The novel follows a high school senior who decides to branch out by participating in an online game of truth or dare. The catch? The game is constantly being watched and commented on. Not surprisingly, she realizes it might not have been the best decision when she starts to advance to higher levels and suddenly finds herself in life-threatening situations.

American Horror Story‘s executive producer Jessica Sharzer wrote the adaptation.

'The Room' star Greg Sestero says James Franco 'ideal guy' to adapt memoir

Can the making of a bad film make for a good one? That is the question raised by the news — reported by Deadline — that James Franco is to direct an adaptation of The Disaster Artist, actor Greg Sestero’s memoir about his time spent starring in the so-bad-it’s-awesome cult movie The Room.

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Shailene Woodley on 'The Fault in Our Stars' tagline: 'It's not something I would have chosen'

On Wednesday, author John Green’s mighty fandom was rocked by the release of the first poster for The Fault in Our Stars, a highly anticipated film adaptation of Green’s bestselling YA novel.

The image itself seemed pretty much perfect — a romantic shot of the film’s cancer-stricken teenage lovers Hazel (Shailene Woodley) and Augustus (Ansel Elgort), lying in a patch of grass and looking blissfully happy together. Hazel was even wearing her cannula. But one sentence at the bottom of the poster threatened to ruin the effect. It’s the film’s chosen tagline — which reads, “One sick love story.”

Some labeled it glib and offensive. Others applauded it, admiring the tagline’s stark gallows humor. Now Fault star Woodley herself has weighed in on the tagline as well… and though she ultimately supports it, the actress also says she would have picked something different if the decision had been hers to make. READ FULL STORY

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