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Category: Books (11-20 of 167)

'Divergent' worked. Now what?

All hail Divergent! A collective sigh of relief emanated from the halls of Hollywood this past weekend when the latest attempt to score with young female moviegoers worked with the successful $55 million debut of the post-apocalyptic film Divergent. And it’s not just the studio executives at Summit Entertainment who are breathing a sigh of relief as they ready the next two movies in the trilogy based on Veronica Roth’s young adult novels. The exhale also comes from those in Hollywood who had been working on a host of teen-centric adaptations last year amid the troubling trend that saw any project not called The Hunger Games flop, including Beautiful Creatures, The Mortal Instruments, and Stephenie Meyer’s The Host. READ FULL STORY

'The Giver' trailer: Meryl Streep! Jeff Bridges! Color?! VIDEO

So this is how you finally make a movie of The Giver after more than 15 years of development hell: By aging up the characters, adding in awesome body-snatching spaceships, and setting the whole thing to a pounding score straight out of the Dystopian YA Handbook.

Lois Lowry’s classic story — one of the first modern dystopic tales written explicitly for a younger audience — takes place in a future where all of the unpleasant, messy aspects of life (war, pain, difference, feelings in general) have been wiped away. (In the book, even the concept of color has been erased… but perhaps because they feared scaring off today’s teens with black-and-white scenes, The Giver‘s team seems to have elected to ignore that part.)

Its main character is Jonas (newly turned 12 in the book, but here played by strapping 24-year-old Aussie Brenton Thwaites), a boy who is chosen to become the community’s new Receiver of Memory — the only person who can recall what life was like before Sameness descended. But as Jonas begins his training under the outgoing Receiver — a.k.a. The Giver (Jeff Bridges, who also produced the film) — he realizes everything his people lost when they elected to soften the world’s hard edges… and decides to take drastic action to change things for good.

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Mick Jagger! Orson Welles! Giant worms! Check out the trailer for 'Jodorowsky's Dune' -- VIDEO

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Would you see a big-budget adaptation of Frank Herbert’s classic sci-fi novel Dune directed by genius-madman Alejandro Jodorowsky and starring Mick Jagger, Orson Welles, and Salvador Dali?

So would I — but, alas, we never will. In the mid-’70s, Hollywood studios declined to finance just such a project after Jodorowsky spent a couple of years prepping the movie with a band of hugely gifted artists including future Alien creators H.R. Giger and Dan O’Bannon. (In fairness to the studio execs, they may have been justifiably reluctant to invest in a project which Jodorowsky himself believed might be as many as 20 hours long).

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'Catfish' directors to adapt Jeanne Ryan's 'Nerve'

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Directing duo Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman — the team behind the documentary film Catfish — have a lot of nerve. (Get it?)

EW has confirmed that the duo will direct an upcoming adaptation of Nerve, Jeanne Ryan’s hit YA novel, for Lionsgate. The novel follows a high school senior who decides to branch out by participating in an online game of truth or dare. The catch? The game is constantly being watched and commented on. Not surprisingly, she realizes it might not have been the best decision when she starts to advance to higher levels and suddenly finds herself in life-threatening situations.

American Horror Story‘s executive producer Jessica Sharzer wrote the adaptation.

'The Room' star Greg Sestero says James Franco 'ideal guy' to adapt memoir

Can the making of a bad film make for a good one? That is the question raised by the news — reported by Deadline — that James Franco is to direct an adaptation of The Disaster Artist, actor Greg Sestero’s memoir about his time spent starring in the so-bad-it’s-awesome cult movie The Room.

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Shailene Woodley on 'The Fault in Our Stars' tagline: 'It's not something I would have chosen'

On Wednesday, author John Green’s mighty fandom was rocked by the release of the first poster for The Fault in Our Stars, a highly anticipated film adaptation of Green’s bestselling YA novel.

The image itself seemed pretty much perfect — a romantic shot of the film’s cancer-stricken teenage lovers Hazel (Shailene Woodley) and Augustus (Ansel Elgort), lying in a patch of grass and looking blissfully happy together. Hazel was even wearing her cannula. But one sentence at the bottom of the poster threatened to ruin the effect. It’s the film’s chosen tagline — which reads, “One sick love story.”

Some labeled it glib and offensive. Others applauded it, admiring the tagline’s stark gallows humor. Now Fault star Woodley herself has weighed in on the tagline as well… and though she ultimately supports it, the actress also says she would have picked something different if the decision had been hers to make. READ FULL STORY

'Fifty Shades of Grey' casts Anastasia's stepfather

Dylan Neal, who plays Dr. Ivo on The CW’s Arrow, will be Anastasia Steele’s stepdad in Fifty Shades of Grey. Universal quickly confirmed a Deadline report that the 44-year-old Canadian will portray Bob Adams, the relatively new and well-grounded fourth husband of Jennifer Ehle’s Carla.

Neal will get right to work, beginning filming this week in Vancouver.

Neal also currently stars in Cedar Grove, The Hallmark Channel series with Andie MacDowell that begins shooting its second season this spring.

In Sam Taylor-Johnson’s adaptation of E L James’ steamy best-seller, Jamie Dornan will star as Christian Grey, opposite Dakota Johnson as Anastasia Steele. Joining them in the cast are Eloise Mumford as Kate, Anastasia’s best friend and roommate; Luke Grimes as Christian’s brother, Elliot; Marcia Gay Harden as Christian’s adoptive mother, Dr. Grace Trevelyan Grey; Rita Ora as Christian’s sister, Mia; Victor Rasuk as Anastasia’s close friend, José; and Max Martini as Christian Grey’s bodyguard and head of his security team, Jason Taylor.

'300 Rise of an Empire' trailer: Eva Green lets slip the dogs of war -- VIDEO

The first trailer for 300: Rise of an Empire, the sidequel to Zack Snyder’s 2007 blockbuster about the brave Spartans who died a noble death at the Battle of Thermopylae, let Lena Headey’s Queen Gorgo set the tone with her voiceover. In the new clip for the movie, the tables are turned, and Persia’s blood-thirsty naval gladiatrix Artemisia (Eva Green) explains the stakes. “Today we will dance across the backs of dead Greeks,” she says. “I will attack the Greeks with my entire navy.”

…but before that, I will make out with Themistocles (Sullivan Stapleton), the dreamy Greek general who picks up his sword to avenge the fallen 300 and unite the Greeks against the Persians.

Watch the clip below. READ FULL STORY

Ben Affleck on what to expect from David Fincher's 'Gone Girl' -- EXCLUSIVE

As a director, Ben Affleck is three-for-three, a perfect batting average that includes Gone Baby Gone, The Town, and a Best Picture Oscar for his last film, Argo. But he’s not above picking up pointers from his own directors. To that end, Affleck is in the midst of what might be considered a Ph.D. filmmaking class on the set of Gone Girl, David Fincher’s adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s best-selling novel about a woman who goes missing on her fifth wedding anniversary. “I truly kind of show up with a notepad,” says Affleck, who plays Nick Dunne, the husband who is suspected of his wife’s murder. “He’s the only director I’ve worked with who I felt like could do everyone else’s job as well, if not better, than they could; who is able to articulate exactly what he was thinking; and who understands the technical side of the work as much as the creative side, which is to say, a lot. I’ve learned more from David in a day or two than I have most movies I’ve spent 80 days on.” READ FULL STORY

'Fifty Shades of Grey' author E L James on the film: 'I'm terrified' -- EXCLUSIVE

Best-selling author E L James doesn’t give many interviews these days, but she agreed to sit down in Beverly Hills with EW last week, as part of our cover story on the film version of the first book in her trilogy, Fifty Shades of Grey, to discuss all that casting controversy, the intensity of her fans, the criticism of Christian Grey’s backstory, and her hopes for the film. She proved to be as direct and unfiltered as her books are, beginning with how she’s feeling about the new movie.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: The film adaptation of Fifty Shades of Grey is about to start shooting in Vancouver. How are you feeling about it?
E L JAMES: I’m terrified. Completely. I’ve been terrified from the moment I published the book.  My mother was terrified of everything, and so am I. It’s a terrible way to grow up. You don’t expect this kind of success. Even now it floors me. My only ambition for the books was to see them in bookstores. This is huge. And there is this passionate fandom; we need to get this right for them.
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