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Category: Music (1-10 of 162)

See the exclusive music video for 'The Hobbit's 'Last Goodbye,' with Billy Boyd and goosebumps aplenty

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When it came to finally bid farewell to Middle-earth after 16 years and six epic films, Peter Jackson gave the last word to one of the original members of the Fellowship. Billy Boyd, who portrayed loyal hobbit Pippin in the Lord of the Rings trilogy, collaborated with Jackson, Fran Walsh, and Philippa Boyens to write “The Last Goodbye,” the song that will play over the credits when The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies opens on Dec. 17.

“We had to get the song just right, to send the audience out of the movie theater in the most perfect way we could,” says Boyd, in an e-mail. “But I don’t think it was until I was sitting on the long flight down to New Zealand that I started to really think about what the song would be. Luckily all the Middle-earth movies were on the flight so I could remind myself of them as I flew south.”

If you thought the ballad stirred some powerful goosebump emotions when it debuted online last week, you haven’t got a prayer this morning. EW has the exclusive music video for the franchise-capping song, and it includes Boyd’s performance, mixed with classic scenes from the series and touching behind-the-scenes footage of your favorite characters. This is the moment when you suddenly panic that the amazing journey is really coming to an end.   READ FULL STORY

Lana Del Rey will have two songs in 'Big Eyes'

Tim Burton and Lana Del Rey—two artists with macabre sensibilities and an interest in kitsch—are coming together this fall.

Del Rey has written two new songs for the movie about artist Margaret Keane, EW confirmed. One is named after the film’s title and plays midway through the movie. The other, “I Can Fly,” will play over the end credits. Burton’s movie, which stars Amy Adams, follows Keane—known for her paintings of children with, yes, big eyes—and her struggle with her husband, who took credit for her work. READ FULL STORY

'Birdman' composer reveals how he made the film's crazy, drum-heavy soundtrack

Birdman greets theatergoers today, and it does so with a score that sounds not unlike two hours of silverware tumbling down a staircase. (In the best way.)

Director Alejandro González Iñárritu and sound designer Martín Hernández opted for a soundtrack composed almost entirely of percussion to amp up film’s tension and give them greater flexibility with pacing. The man they recruited to make those noises was multiple-Grammy winning jazz drummer Antonio Sanchez, who worked closely with the pair as he riffed and clanged his way through the movie’s sonic backdrop. He explained to EW how the score came together. READ FULL STORY

From 'Psycho' to 'Gone Girl': the best director/composer teams

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With this weekend’s release of Gone Girl, director David Fincher has once again showcased the unsettling sounds of award-winning composers Atticus Ross and Trent Reznor (above). Ever since 2010′s The Social Network, the duo have become a fixture of Fincher’s work. The duo’s deceptively minimal sound, with subtle motifs barely hiding cold electronic undercurrents, is remarkably well-suited for Fincher’s trademark visual aesthetic, in which every smile and doorway can take on an air of menace if the camera lingers long enough. While he has worked with a number of composers before—most notably Howard Shore—Fincher has found a sonic soulmate in Ross and Reznor’s scoring.

But what about the other great director/composer relationships in Hollywood history? What other composers have had their music strongly associated with a director’s work, so much so that you can’t picture a film without hearing the score?  READ FULL STORY

The National chime in for new 'Theory of Everything' trailer

With the Best Actor Oscar race heating up, as this week’s New York Film Festival sheds the spotlight on Ben Affleck (Gone Girl), Joaquin Phoenix (Inherent Vice), Miles Teller (Whiplash), and Michael Keaton (Birdman), Focus Features debuted a new trailer for The Theory of Everything, perhaps as a gentle reminder that Eddie Redmayne was the talk of the town just a few weeks ago in Toronto.

His performance as British astrophysicist Stephen Hawking is a major career breakthrough for the dashing young actor best known for Les Miserables, and the role of Hawking, the brilliant mathematician whose disease cost him his voice and confined him to a wheelchair, is quintessential Oscar bait. The new trailer focuses on the man versus the crippling disease, with the help of his devoted first wife, Jane (Felicity Jones). Focus also splurged on the music, plugging in The National’s “Heavenfaced” to help inspire. READ FULL STORY

J.K. Simmons toys with Miles Teller in 'Whiplash' clip

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When director Damien Chazelle was in high school in Princeton, N.J., he played drums in his school’s highly competitive jazz ensemble, which was led by an intense conductor who ruled with an iron fist.

“Drums had always been like a fun hobby for me, and for four years, when I was in that ensemble, it became just a source of constant dread and just terror and anxiety,” the 29-year-old director said last winter at the Sundance Film Festival, where his film Whiplash won top prizes. Practicing constantly, under mental if not physical duress, left scars that were still raw when Chazelle decided to write Whiplash. ”This was the most personal thing I’d ever written, and I put it in a drawer for awhile,” he said. ”I was almost embarrassed to show it because it seemed like exposing a part of myself that I didn’t really want exposed.”

The writer/director admits he still has nightmares—nightmares that audiences can understand after meeting J.K. Simmons’s music teacher in Whiplash. Mr. Holland he is not.

In this exclusive scene from the film, which opens in theaters Oct. 10 after recent screenings at the New York Film Festival, Miles Teller’s eager drum prodigy meets the school’s revered conductor, a man who can make or break his future. In a romantic-comedy, this scene might be termed the meet-cute. But in this tense drama, it immediately sets the unsettling tone for the clash of wills to follow.  READ FULL STORY

Watch Nick Cave consider his will in this '20,000 Days on Earth' clip

Calling 20,000 Days on Earth “a documentary about Nick Cave” is both accurate and deeply reductive. Yes, its primary focus is a walk through Cave’s life and career and zeroes in on the creation of his last album, 2013′s Push the Sky Away, but it is so full of stunningly considered ideas and cheeky surrealism that it is unlike any rock doc ever made.

That was the point, according to Cave. “Music documentaries are often very similar to meeting a hero, you know? You love the person’s music but you wish you never met them,” he told EW during a discussion of the film. “They often do more damage than good, I think. They attempt to make the subject of the documentary human, and that’s not really what we want to see.” READ FULL STORY

Meet Pixar's singing volcano in 'Lava' short

It’s a rare off year for Pixar, with no full-length feature in theaters until next summer. But Disney recently shared an adorable clip from Lava, the short that was slated to debut in front of The Good Dinosaur—before that movie was delayed from May 2014 to November 2015. As you can see, Lava is the story of a singing Hawaiian volcano, named Uku, who is looking for love.

The name Uku evokes the ukelele—the popular Hawaiian guitar-like instrument that practically scores the state’s sunsets and seduces millions of mainland tourists every year. The late Israel Kamakawiwo’ole’s strummed a uke, and Lava director James Murphy told Yahoo that his short was in part inspired by the singer’s version of “Somewhere Over the Rainbow.”“I thought that if I could marry the rich imagery and with the power and emotion of music, then I could really make something cool,” he told the site.

Singer Kuana Torres Kahele provides Uku’s voice, and one-third of the inspiration for the volcano’s face. The other two-thirds: Jackie Gleeson, and the cartoon bulldog in the Looney Tunes short, “Feed the Kitty.” READ FULL STORY

Martin Scorsese interested in directing a Ramones movie

The period between Martin Scorsese films is routinely filled with several speculative reports trumpeting fascinating-sounding “next” projects. There’s his long-gestating Sinatra movie, his plans to unite Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, and Joe Pesci in The Irishman, and a biopic about the formative years of Teddy Roosevelt. Maybe they’ll get made someday; maybe not. His next concrete project is Silence, with Andrew Garfield and Adam Driver, which starts shooting next year—but another potential film project is already drawing attention. READ FULL STORY

Memphis legends young and old pair up in 'Take Me To the River' trailer

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Detroit has Motown, but the Mississippi delta is where it all began. The gospel, folk, soul and R&B music that developed there evolved into modern pop and became the soundtrack for multiple generations of Americans; and the city of Memphis became this cultural oasis for all sorts of musical experiments and breakthroughs, exemplified by the heyday of Stax Records. In Take Me To the River, filmmaker Martin Shore paired old-school legends with current hip-hop artists for an album and a documentary about the timeless language of music that speaks across all generations and races.

“Outside, on the streets of Memphis, it was one of the most segregated places in the world, but inside the studio it was a musical utopia,” Shore said. “In Memphis, people made music that suited them—not what other people thought would be good. It wasn’t prefabricated. It was anything but manufactured. It was real music expressed in a real way.”

Snoop Dogg, who collaborated with soul singer William Bell to record “I Forgot to Be Your Lover,” said, “This is where the seed was planted. This is the origins of it all. When I finally meet my day… I can look back at this and show my grandkids—this is history right here.”

Other musical pairings include Mavis Staples with the North Mississippi All-Stars; Bobby “Blue” Bland with Yo Gotti; Bobby Rush with Frayser Boy; Otis Clay with Lil’ P-Nut; Booker T. Jones with Al Kapone; Charlie Musselwhite with the City Champs; Howlin’ Wolf guitarist Hubert Sumlin with Eric Gales and Ian Siegal; and Hi Rhythm Section with Terrence Howard, the doc’s narrator and a Memphis legend himself after his Oscar-nominated performance in Hustle & Flow. READ FULL STORY

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