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Category: Music (21-30 of 150)

Mick Jagger! Orson Welles! Giant worms! Check out the trailer for 'Jodorowsky's Dune' -- VIDEO

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Would you see a big-budget adaptation of Frank Herbert’s classic sci-fi novel Dune directed by genius-madman Alejandro Jodorowsky and starring Mick Jagger, Orson Welles, and Salvador Dali?

So would I — but, alas, we never will. In the mid-’70s, Hollywood studios declined to finance just such a project after Jodorowsky spent a couple of years prepping the movie with a band of hugely gifted artists including future Alien creators H.R. Giger and Dan O’Bannon. (In fairness to the studio execs, they may have been justifiably reluctant to invest in a project which Jodorowsky himself believed might be as many as 20 hours long).

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Oscars 2014: Karen O's 'Moon Song' for 'Her' was '10 years in the making' -- VIDEO

The courtship exhibited in Her might be unconventional, but you wouldn’t know that from Karen O’s “The Moon Song” — a sweet, simple ukulele ode to a long-distance love.

The Yeah Yeah Yeahs vocalist scored her first Oscar nomination for the song, which Scarlett Johansson’s OS Samantha sings in the film, while Joaquin Phoenix’s lonely Theodore provides the instrumentals. Director Spike Jonze co-wrote the lyrics, and it was recently announced that Karen O would be performing the song at the Academy Awards on March 2.

Check out a Warner Bros. featurette backed by the quiet song after the jump. Framed by Amy Adams’ character reassuring us that “anybody who falls in love is a freak,” and set to some gorgeous clips from the film, we’re not promising that those who stick it out will make it to the end with dry eyes. Blame the Rooney Mara flashbacks. READ FULL STORY

U2, Karen O to perform at Oscars

The Oscars are looking to be a night of musical debuts. Earlier this week, we learned that Idina Menzel will perform Frozen‘s “Let It Go” for the first time live. And Wednesday night, the Oscars revealed that U2 will appear to perform their song “Ordinary Love” — also for the first time before a live audience.

On Thursday, the show’s producers announced that Yeah Yeah Yeahs frontwoman Karen O is also on board to perform “The Moon Song” from Her, which O cowrote with the film’s writer/director Spike Jonze. All three songs are nominated for Best Original Song, along with “Happy” from Despicable Me 2; as previously announced, “Happy” writer Pharrell will sing the tune at the ceremony.

Ordinary Love” was written for Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom. Earlier this year, it snagged the Golden Globe for Best Original Song.

The Oscars, hosted by Ellen DeGeneres, will be broadcast live March 2 on ABC.

'Alone Yet Not Alone': Academy says revoked Original Song composer contacted a third of voters

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Three days after yanking the Original Song nomination from the religious period-drama Alone Yet Not Alone, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has issue a more detailed explanation about why the theme song was disqualified.

At issue was composer Bruce Broughton, a former governor of the group’s music branch, who acknowledged that he privately emailed members of that voting division and asked them to consider his song from the relatively obscure movie.

Meanwhile, Broughton is questioning whether what he did was any different than the past award-season consulting done by the current Academy president, who comes from a background in marketing and public relations.

Since every film is hyped and promoted in some way, the Academy is now explaining why his actions were deemed improper — saying he directly reached out to nearly one-third of the voters in his field, and used his position as a leader to gain an advantage that other contenders didn’t have.

“The Academy takes very seriously anything that undermines the integrity of the Oscars voting process,” Saturday’s statement read. “The Board regretfully concluded that Mr. Broughton’s actions did precisely that.”

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See the poster for The National documentary, 'Mistaken for Strangers' -- EXCLUSIVE

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By the time The National released their sixth album, Trouble Will Find Me, last spring, the hard-working indie band had finally attained a level of fame and mainstream success that is often accompanied by documentary film crews and behind-the-music drama. But true to the band’s band-of-brothers kinship and conscientious sensibilities, the guy holding the camera for their close-up wasn’t some Hollywood auteur, and the backstage drama had to be imported. In Mistaken for Strangers, National frontman Matt Berninger invited his younger brother Tom to work the 2010 High Violet tour as a roadie. An aspiring filmmaker, Tom brought along his camera to make a few videos to post on the band’s website. Instead, Tom became the center of a meta documentary about two brothers: one, a rock god; the other, a laid-back dreamer just trying to finish what he started, for once.

Mistaken for Strangers opened last year’s Tribeca Film Festival, and its rapturous reception made Tom Berninger, an unabashed slacker who prefers heavy metal to “pretentious [indie] bullsh-t,” as much a celebrity as his rock-star brother. “At the after-party, these famous people and other filmmakers were telling me how much they loved it,” says Tom, still awed by the experience nine months later. “I always wanted to be in the movie business but I never took myself very seriously until that moment.” READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Belle & Sebastian frontman Stuart Murdoch on his musical ode to Glasgow, 'God Help The Girl'

Belle & Sebastian lead singer Stuart Murdoch’s first feature film, God Help The Girl, is a musical with an indie rock soundtrack, so comparisons to another Sundance breakout – the 2007 Glen Hansard musical Once – are only natural. But in fact, Murdoch’s film has been in the works since before Once was even a glimmer in Dublin’s eye. Back in 2003, Murdoch started work on a song that came to him during a morning run. In between working on three Belle & Sebastian records and touring with the band, Murdoch began working on a series of songs that were released as a compilation in 2009 and now make up the full-length feature, God Help The Girl, which premiered at Sundance on Saturday. The musical tells the story of Eve (Emily Browning), an 18-year-old who discovers her love of music one Scottish summer. If you think Scottish summer is an oxymoron, you’re not wrong. “It was terrible!! We had a terrible summer! The highest temperature was about 55 degrees or something but we made the most of it,” Murdoch tells EW of shooting the film.

Read on for more about how the band helped with the film, Murdoch’s girl group influences, and the hardest part of directing for the first time.
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Elijah Wood must tinkle the ivories (or die!!!) in new trailer for 'Grand Piano'

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Do you enjoy the films of Elijah Wood, the concertos of Sergei Rachmaninoff, and the oeuvre of Dutch director Jan de Bont (specifically his 1994 action movie Speed)? What admirably wide-ranging tastes you have. Also? You’re going to want to take a look at the new trailer for Grand Piano.

Directed by Eugenio Mira, the film stars Wood as a pianist who, at this comeback performance, finds an extremely ominous message on his score: “Play one wrong note and you die.” Gadzooks! That’s even worse than the dream I had about playing the tuba at school while naked.

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Jared Leto on Thirty Seconds to Mars documentary 'Artifact': 'Sometimes you have to fight in order to be free'

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Jared Leto, Shannon Leto, and Tomo Miličević are on a mission to tell the truth for all musicians. The members of Thirty Seconds to Mars share the harsh realities about the modern music business in Artifact, a documentary that chronicles the legal dispute between Leto’s band and record label Virgin/EMI, as they composed songs for their album This Is War.

Opening up their lives for the cameras over several months, Leto and Thirty Seconds give an inside look at how they overcame a legal dispute with the label that nearly cost them all their creative and financial freedom. “I’m excited to share our insight on how this business really works,” Leto says. “We get down to the nitty-gritty. We talk about this business inside and out and reveal quite a few things I think people will be shocked to realize. I think we made the right decision. Sometimes you have to fight in order to be free, and we did exactly that. We fought for what we knew was right, what we knew was fair. We were sued by EMI, but we didn’t let that intimidate us.”
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'X-Men' trailer leans on Hans Zimmer's 'Thin Red Line' score, a.k.a. 'The Fassbender Suite'

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Hans Zimmer has been composing classic Hollywood scores for 30 years, but you can practically pinpoint when he was handed the baton to become the Maestro. For more than a generation, John Williams, famous for Jaws, Star Wars, and Indiana Jones, was the artist who scored our dreams, but last July, Warner Bros. announced that it was retiring Williams’ iconic Superman theme. Instead, Zimmer — the composer behind The Dark Knight, Inception, and Gladiator — would provide the melody that a new generation of kids would hum while they pretend to fly around their backyards after seeing Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel.

An eight-time Oscar nominee — who won for The Lion King — Zimmer is best known for his collaborations with director Christopher Nolan, but the one track that seems to have made the longest-lasting impact is from Terrence Malick’s 1998 World War II movie, The Thin Red Line, in which Jim Caviezel is an oasis of serenity (above) within the hell-hole of war. Fifteen years later, “Journey to the Line” is a go-to tone-setter for the biggest and most ambitious Hollywood films. It accompanied the first footage of Man of Steel when Snyder reintroduced the character at Comic-Con 2012. The most recent trailer for X-Men: Days of Future Past pumps it up just as Wolverine screams in anguish, while Steve McQueen’s saga, 12 Years a Slave, leans heavily on the tune just after Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor) says, “I don’t want to survive. I want to live!”

Triumph. Tragedy. Serenity. Deep, profound emotional release. The music conveys it all, and could eke a single tear down your cheek even if it played over Grown Ups 3: Dookie in the Pool. Plus, the tune is evocative without being iconic. Not many people hear it in a trailer and go, “Cool, ‘Journey to the Line’ from The Thin Red Line!” Instead, they might think, “Whoa, this movie sounds intense and important. Why am I crying at naked, blue-skinned Jennifer Lawrence?”

With X-Men and 12 Years, Michael Fassbender certainly seems to be profiting from the soundtrack association. He’s already intense and important, but “Journey to the Line” has now played over three of his biggest recent films, including last year’s Shame. [Correction: Actually, the piece of music in the Shame trailer is a Zimmer soundalike from composer Harry Escott.] Maybe, as one of my colleagues suggested today, hearing “Journey to the Line” is simply how it feels to be Michael Fassbender every day…

Click below to hear “Journey to the Line” — or as some call it, “The Fassbender Suite” — in a few of its trailer incarnations:
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Texas theater chain bans Madonna after reported texting incident

A Texas-based theater chain has banned Madonna after the pop star was apparently admonished for rudely texting during a premiere screening.

Madonna was reportedly texting up a storm while attending the New York Film Festival premiere of 12 Years A Slave last week and reacted in a rather spectacularly annoyed manner when asked to stop (‘It’s for business … enslaver!”).

The Alamo Drafthouse Cinema chain has long had a strict no-talking and anti-texting policy for its theaters, and will eject any patron that violates the policy. So when word of the incident reached Alamo founder and CEO Tim League, he tweeted (below) that Madonna would no longer be welcome at the chain until she “apologizes to movie fans.”

Asked by EW if he was serious about the ban — at one point while defending his stance on Twitter he had called it a joke — League replied late Saturday, “Yeah, I’m serious, but I don’t think it really affects her life that much.”

League pointed out his initial tweet was an “offhand joke, a spur of the moment 140 characters” and was “more of a means to get the issue out there, that it is rude to text during movies.”

“But now that it seems to have taken hold, sure, I’m going to enforce it,” he added.

Madonna has not responded to the reactions or to the rather anecdotal-sounding initial report, details about which can be found here.

Below are League’s tweets and the Alamo’s NSFW anti-texting message that plays before some R-rated films at its theaters. When this video first hit the Internet a couple years ago, it became a viral sensation (and yes, the voicemail is real, the story behind it here): READ FULL STORY

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