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Category: Music (31-40 of 153)

Jared Leto on Thirty Seconds to Mars documentary 'Artifact': 'Sometimes you have to fight in order to be free'

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Jared Leto, Shannon Leto, and Tomo Miličević are on a mission to tell the truth for all musicians. The members of Thirty Seconds to Mars share the harsh realities about the modern music business in Artifact, a documentary that chronicles the legal dispute between Leto’s band and record label Virgin/EMI, as they composed songs for their album This Is War.

Opening up their lives for the cameras over several months, Leto and Thirty Seconds give an inside look at how they overcame a legal dispute with the label that nearly cost them all their creative and financial freedom. “I’m excited to share our insight on how this business really works,” Leto says. “We get down to the nitty-gritty. We talk about this business inside and out and reveal quite a few things I think people will be shocked to realize. I think we made the right decision. Sometimes you have to fight in order to be free, and we did exactly that. We fought for what we knew was right, what we knew was fair. We were sued by EMI, but we didn’t let that intimidate us.”
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'X-Men' trailer leans on Hans Zimmer's 'Thin Red Line' score, a.k.a. 'The Fassbender Suite'

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Hans Zimmer has been composing classic Hollywood scores for 30 years, but you can practically pinpoint when he was handed the baton to become the Maestro. For more than a generation, John Williams, famous for Jaws, Star Wars, and Indiana Jones, was the artist who scored our dreams, but last July, Warner Bros. announced that it was retiring Williams’ iconic Superman theme. Instead, Zimmer — the composer behind The Dark Knight, Inception, and Gladiator — would provide the melody that a new generation of kids would hum while they pretend to fly around their backyards after seeing Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel.

An eight-time Oscar nominee — who won for The Lion King — Zimmer is best known for his collaborations with director Christopher Nolan, but the one track that seems to have made the longest-lasting impact is from Terrence Malick’s 1998 World War II movie, The Thin Red Line, in which Jim Caviezel is an oasis of serenity (above) within the hell-hole of war. Fifteen years later, “Journey to the Line” is a go-to tone-setter for the biggest and most ambitious Hollywood films. It accompanied the first footage of Man of Steel when Snyder reintroduced the character at Comic-Con 2012. The most recent trailer for X-Men: Days of Future Past pumps it up just as Wolverine screams in anguish, while Steve McQueen’s saga, 12 Years a Slave, leans heavily on the tune just after Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor) says, “I don’t want to survive. I want to live!”

Triumph. Tragedy. Serenity. Deep, profound emotional release. The music conveys it all, and could eke a single tear down your cheek even if it played over Grown Ups 3: Dookie in the Pool. Plus, the tune is evocative without being iconic. Not many people hear it in a trailer and go, “Cool, ‘Journey to the Line’ from The Thin Red Line!” Instead, they might think, “Whoa, this movie sounds intense and important. Why am I crying at naked, blue-skinned Jennifer Lawrence?”

With X-Men and 12 Years, Michael Fassbender certainly seems to be profiting from the soundtrack association. He’s already intense and important, but “Journey to the Line” has now played over three of his biggest recent films, including last year’s Shame. [Correction: Actually, the piece of music in the Shame trailer is a Zimmer soundalike from composer Harry Escott.] Maybe, as one of my colleagues suggested today, hearing “Journey to the Line” is simply how it feels to be Michael Fassbender every day…

Click below to hear “Journey to the Line” — or as some call it, “The Fassbender Suite” — in a few of its trailer incarnations:
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Texas theater chain bans Madonna after reported texting incident

A Texas-based theater chain has banned Madonna after the pop star was apparently admonished for rudely texting during a premiere screening.

Madonna was reportedly texting up a storm while attending the New York Film Festival premiere of 12 Years A Slave last week and reacted in a rather spectacularly annoyed manner when asked to stop (‘It’s for business … enslaver!”).

The Alamo Drafthouse Cinema chain has long had a strict no-talking and anti-texting policy for its theaters, and will eject any patron that violates the policy. So when word of the incident reached Alamo founder and CEO Tim League, he tweeted (below) that Madonna would no longer be welcome at the chain until she “apologizes to movie fans.”

Asked by EW if he was serious about the ban — at one point while defending his stance on Twitter he had called it a joke — League replied late Saturday, “Yeah, I’m serious, but I don’t think it really affects her life that much.”

League pointed out his initial tweet was an “offhand joke, a spur of the moment 140 characters” and was “more of a means to get the issue out there, that it is rude to text during movies.”

“But now that it seems to have taken hold, sure, I’m going to enforce it,” he added.

Madonna has not responded to the reactions or to the rather anecdotal-sounding initial report, details about which can be found here.

Below are League’s tweets and the Alamo’s NSFW anti-texting message that plays before some R-rated films at its theaters. When this video first hit the Internet a couple years ago, it became a viral sensation (and yes, the voicemail is real, the story behind it here): READ FULL STORY

Elijah Wood's SpectreVision announces L.A. horror film festival

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Elijah Wood’s company SpectreVision Wednesday announced the first annual SpectreFest, a 13-night celebration of horror and music to be held in Los Angeles from October 19-31 in partnership with the Cinefamily cinema. SpectreVision is an independent horror film company founded by Wood, Daniel Noah, and Josh C. Waller.

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'Muscle Shoals': Aretha Franklin gets some r-e-s-p-e-c-t -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

When Aretha Franklin walks into a room, you know it.

“The girl was special,” music writer and producer Dan Penn says of the Queen of Soul in the clip below. We see Franklin taking to the piano back in the ’60s at Rick Hall’s iconic FAME studio, as well as looking back in a recent interview about her unique experience recording  there.
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Susan Boyle to make movie debut in Christmas film

Susan Boyle, the eccentric British woman who became a worldwide sensation after singing “I Dreamed a Dream” on Britain’s Got Talent in 2009, will make her movie debut in The Christmas Candle, a family film based on Max Lucardo’s book about the Christmas miracles that occur every 25 years in a small candle-lit English village since 1890. Boyle will appear in the ensemble movie, and of course, her voice is featured prominently. Her new single, “Miracle Hymn,” from her upcoming holiday album, Home for Christmas, serves as the film’s anthem. READ FULL STORY

Tupac Shakur biopic to be filmed in 2014

A new biopic on slain rapper Tupac Shakur is coming.

Morgan Creek Productions and Emmett/Furla Films announced in a Thursday news release they are in final negotiations to partner on the production of Tupac. The picture will begin filming next year in Atlanta. READ FULL STORY

Dane DeHaan tries not to get burned in 'Metallica: Through the Never' -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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You had to know that if Metallica ever attempted a concert movie, it would be unlike anything that any band had previously done. It would be loud, it would be twisted, and it would kick down the movie screen and get in your face. In Metallica: Through the Never, the band’s concert theatrics are interspliced with a related narrative: a lowly roadie named Trip (Dane DeHaan) is sent on a mission to recover a gassed-out van with precious cargo. While he ventures out into the night, he encounters more than a little urban unrest — the kind of unrest that can only be described by a pounding Metallica song like One.

In this exclusive clip from the movie, which debuts on IMAX 3-D on Sept. 27, Trip dodges an angry mob, recognizes a riderless horse, and steps aside as the heat races past. And the band plays on. READ FULL STORY

'The Punk Singer' director on capturing the essence of Bikini Kill's Kathleen Hanna -- POSTER PREMIERE

Riot Grrrl founder Kathleen Hanna never intended to be the subject of a feature-length film. She just wanted a concert documentary.

But Sini Anderson, Hanna’s close friend and the eventual director of The Punk Singer, pushed for more. “I thought it was a really good time for people to know not just about Le Tigre, but about her story,” Anderson told EW of the lead singer of Bikini Kill and Le Tigre. “I think that was a terrifying idea for Kathleen.” She eventually came on board and what resulted is an intimate portrait of Hanna at the center of the movement told through 20 years of archival footage and interviews with Hanna and those who are and were closest to her, including Joan Jett and The Beastie Boys’ Adam Horovitz, to whom Hanna has been married since 2006.

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Box office report: 'One Direction' wins weekend with $17 million; Spanish-language 'Instructions' stuns at No. 5

One Direction: This is Us plummeted 54 percent from Friday ($8.9 million) to Saturday ($4.0 million), but the boy band’s concert film still topped the three-day frame over Labor Day weekend with an estimated $17 million. Audiences, which were 87 percent female and 65 percent below the age of 17, rushed out to the theater on Friday (and awarded This Is Us an “A” CinemaScore), but the film’s intense frontloadedness could open a door for Lee Daniels’ The Butler to surpass it over the four day frame.

One Direction fared better than last year’s Katy Perry: Part of Me, which arrived with a whisper instead of a “Roar” on its opening weekend, grossing only $7.3 million. Yet 1D couldn’t outdo Justin Bieber: Never Say Never, which danced up $29 million in its opening frame. (This is guaranteed to anger some Directioners, though fans can brag that This Is Us opened to $5.7 million in the U.K. — 187 percent above Never Say Never.) Sony spent just $10 million on the film, which has already become director Morgan Spurlock’s highest grossing feature ever — ahead of his fast food doc Supersize Me, which found $11.5 million total. READ FULL STORY

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