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Tag: 3-D (11-20 of 185)

Box office report: 'The Lego Movie' stacks up $69.1 million for 'awesome' debut, 'Monuments Men' steals second with $22.7 million

Everything is awesome for the team behind The Lego Movie (Cinema Score: A). The 3D animated extravaganza is estimated to have earned a spectacular $69.11 million this weekend — the biggest opening of the still young year, and the second largest February opening ever (the top spot belongs to 2004′s Passion of the Christ). The Phil Lord and Christopher Miller movie blew past studio and analyst predictions, which had the pic in the $40 to $55 million range. Playing in 3,775 theaters, most of which were in 3D, Lego scored an incredible $18,307 per location average, and, including overseas profits ($18.1 million from 34 territories), The Lego Movie has already stacked up $87.2 million.

The Lego Movie is Warner Bros.’ first animated release in three years. Village Roadshow co-financed the pic. Featuring the vocal talents of Chris Pratt as Emmet the construction worker, Will Ferrell as the evil Lord Business, Elizabeth Banks as the brilliant Wyldstyle, Liam Neeson as Bad Cop, and Will Arnett as Batman, Lego resonated with both adults and children — 60% of the audience was over 18 years old. A sequel is reportedly already in the works.

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PRIZE FIGHTER: 'Frozen' wins Annie Award; 'Gravity' claims cinematography honor

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It was a big night for Disney at the Annie Awards on Saturday, as Frozen took the best picture prize and the retro-futuristic 3-D Mickey Mouse film Get a Horse! claimed the title of best short.

Meanwhile, at the American Society of Cinematographer Awards, Emmanuel “Chivo” Lubezki collected the top honor for Gravity, a groundbreaking hybrid of real actors, digital visual effects, and 3-D.

All three are leading contenders for the Oscars on March 2.

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Zachary Quinto talks about the new horror movie, 'Banshee Chapter' -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

The new horror movie Banshee Chapter is full of familiar faces, including Katia Winter (Sleepy Hollow), Michael McMillian (True Blood), and the great Ted Levine (Silence of the Lambs, Monk). But the biggest name attached to this tale of psychedelic drug use and threatening, extra-dimensional presences is its executive producer Zachary Quinto, whose production company Before the Door — which he cofounded with Corey Moosa and Neal Dodson — was responsible for overseeing the film.

Below, Quinto talks about his involvement with Banshee Chapter which is now available on VOD and will start a theatrical run in select cities on Jan. 10. And, below our chat with the Star Trek star, check out an exclusive making-of clip featuring interviews with Moosa, producer Stephanie Riggs, and writer-director Blair Erickson.
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Fergal Reilly and Clay Kaytis to direct 'Angry Birds'

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Get ready for some pig-crushing! Rovio Entertainment has announced that veteran animators Fergal Reilly (Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs) and Clay Kaytis (Tangled) will make their directorial debut with Angry Birds, the upcoming 3-D CG-animated film.

Angry Birds is based on Rovio’s best-selling app and will be produced by John Cohen and Catherine Winder. David Maisel is attached to executive produce with a screenplay written by Jon Vitti.

The film is currently slated for a July 1, 2016 release.

Dane DeHaan tries not to get burned in 'Metallica: Through the Never' -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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You had to know that if Metallica ever attempted a concert movie, it would be unlike anything that any band had previously done. It would be loud, it would be twisted, and it would kick down the movie screen and get in your face. In Metallica: Through the Never, the band’s concert theatrics are interspliced with a related narrative: a lowly roadie named Trip (Dane DeHaan) is sent on a mission to recover a gassed-out van with precious cargo. While he ventures out into the night, he encounters more than a little urban unrest — the kind of unrest that can only be described by a pounding Metallica song like One.

In this exclusive clip from the movie, which debuts on IMAX 3-D on Sept. 27, Trip dodges an angry mob, recognizes a riderless horse, and steps aside as the heat races past. And the band plays on. READ FULL STORY

Check out the poster for 'Argento's Dracula 3D' -- EXCLUSIVE

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It seems incredible that horror legend and giallo king Dario Argento spent more than four decades in the business without making a version of Bram Stoker’s classic vampire novel Dracula. But the director has now rectified that omission by putting his name, in a very real sense, to Argento’s Dracula 3-D.
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Fantastic Fest announces closing night film

Filmmakers don’t get much more fantastic — in every sense — than Terry Gilliam, the agreeably bonkers auteur whose filmography includes Time Bandits, Brazil, and Twelve Monkeys. So it seems appropriate Fantastic Fest has decided to close this year’s event with his new movie, The Zero Theorem. The Christoph Waltz-starring film, which concerns a reclusive computer genius plagued with existential angst, will screen at the Austin, Tx.-based genre festival on September 26.

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Is the 3-D fad over?

All the way back in 2009, eager studio executives eyed Avatar‘s $2.8 billion worldwide gross and gushed “I see you” to the film’s groundbreaking 3-D technology. A few months later, Alice in Wonderland became a $1 billion hit, and before Johnny Depp had even wiped the makeup off his face, the industry had decided 3-D would be its savior.

Fox, Paramount, Disney, and Universal collectively shelled out $700 million to help equip theaters with new projectors, and the number of 3-D releases jumped from 20 in 2009 to 45 in 2011. Perhaps most importantly, audiences proved willing to pay an extra $3.50 per ticket, so Hollywood made a point of “enhancing” every film into a “premium” 3-D experience. Oh, what a difference four years makes: 3-D box office receipts are taking a serious tumble these days, and audiences are increasingly opting for cheaper 2-D tickets. So how did the format fall so far so fast? READ FULL STORY

'Gravity': Harrowing new clips of George Clooney and Sandra Bullock astronaut thriller

The desperate astronauts are reaching, scrambling, grasping at anything they can get their hands on.

They end up seizing on the viewer’s throat.

Warner Bros. has released even more new clips from the upcoming Alfonso Cuaron-directed survival saga Gravity, with Sandra Bullock and George Clooney as two space walkers cut adrift in orbit after an accident rips apart their shuttle.

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3-D hits an all-time low with 'Despicable Me 2'

Blockbuster sequel Despicable Me 2 earned $143 million over the extended Fourth of July weekend — and although its debut marked a high point at the summer box office, it also marked a low point for 3-D ticket sales.

According to Universal, only 27 percent of Despicable Me 2‘s opening-weekend gross came from 3-D tickets, the lowest 3-D share in modern box office history. Notably, the record low comes just two weeks after Monsters University notched a 31 percent 3-D share on its opening weekend, which at the time was the worst 3-D performance ever. Poor 3-D ticket sales aren’t just plaguing recent animated films, either. Brad Pitt’s live-action zombie thriller World War Z only earned 34 percent of its debut total from 3-D tickets, and The Great Gatsby fared even worse. Despite the fact that Baz Luhrmann’s use of 3-D was a primary selling point for Gatsby, 3-D ticket sales only accounted for 33 percent of its opening weekend.

These percentages mark a decisive downturn in 3-D’s popularity with American moviegoers, who have generally embraced the enhanced format over the last five years.

In 2009 and 2010, during the heyday of 3-D, films like Avatar (71 percent share), Alice in Wonderland (70 percent), and Tron Legacy (82 percent) added tens of millions of dollars to their opening-weekend grosses with 3-D ticket sales. Hollywood quickly doubled down on the format — sending the number of 3-D wide releases skyrocketing from 15 in 2009 to 36 in 2012. By 2012, though, it already appeared that 3-D was losing some of its luster, as the industry observed lower shares for films like Transformers: Dark of the Moon (60 percent), Thor (60 percent), and The Avengers (52 percent). These days, even highly anticipated box office titans like Iron Man 3 (45 percent), Star Trek Into Darkness (45 percent), and World War Z have trouble cracking the 50 percent threshold.

Family films have been hit particularly hard lately. Of course, it should be noted that they’ve never been quite as popular as live-action films in 3-D — presumably because it costs so much to purchase 3-D tickets for an entire family — but animated titles like Shrek Forever After (60 percent), Toy Story 3 (60 percent), and The Lorax (52 percent) did prove that moms and dads were willing to shell out big bucks on the format. Not so much over the past year, though. Recent films like Brave (34 percent), The Croods (38 percent) and, obviously, Despicable Me 2 haven’t connected with 3-D ticket-buyers despite the fact that they succeeded at the box office.

Many think the 3-D gimmick has lost — or is losing — its novelty due to over-saturation and shoddy execution, and Avatar director James Cameron agrees. “I do not think Hollywood is using the 3-D properly,” Cameron remarked at the TagDF conference in Mexico City last week. “Man of Steel, Iron Man 3 and all those movies should not necessarily be in 3-D,” he continued. “If you spend $150 million on visual effects, the film is already going to be spectacular, perfect.”

What do you think? Is the 3-D fad officially ending?

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