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Oscars 2013: See the Academy's special edition posters for the nine Best Picture nominees

The Best Picture nominees have gotten a pop art facelift. Not that the nine Oscar contenders needed a facelift of any kind, but the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences – along with Gallery1988 – still found a way to produce a fresh, eye-popping take on now-iconic images from these films.

The Academy recently released nine posters, one for each nominee, created by an international group of artists, many of whom have worked with Gallery1988 before.

Called “For Your Consideration,” the project is the first collaborative exhibition for Gallery1988 and the Academy. The Los Angeles gallery’s past entertainment-related poster collections include “Fringe Benefits,” which featured art inspired by fan-favorite episodes of Fringe, and The LOST Underground Art Show. READ FULL STORY

Oscar reactions: Foreign films from Michael Haneke's 'Amour' to Denmark's 'A Royal Affair'

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The power and influence of foreign film has never been more apparent in recent memory when it comes to the Oscars than this year, with Michael Haneke’s beautifully frank French-language look at aging, Amour, being nominated for both best picture and best foreign language film, best director, best actress, and best original screenplay.

Other nominated movies announced Thursday morning in the best foreign language film category for the 85th annual Academy Awards, airing live on ABC Feb. 24, range from Norway’s watery expedition adventure Kon-Tiki to fellow Scandinavian country Denmark’s A Royal Affair, an 18th century set royals drama, to Chile’s NO, starring Gael Garcia Bernal, about the real-life “NO” TV ad campaign that aired during dictator Augusto Pinochet’s reign, and Canada’s War Witch, a French-language story about a teenage Congolese girl abducted by a rebel army to fight for their cause.

Austria’s Amour, with its multiple Oscar nominations and other awards season wins, has been touted as a clear frontrunner, but the category’s mix of tales based on real-life stories, political intrigue, and emotional relationships gives it some heft. Check out these reactions from the films’ directors, below:
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Oscar analysis: Bad day for 'Argo,' 'Les Mis' and 'Zero Dark Thirty'

prize_fighter1_bannerYou could hear the gasp when Benh Zeitlin’s name was read. It reverberated throughout Hollywood, which has to feel good if you’re the first-time feature director.

Even he didn’t expect himself to get a nomination. “For director, I honestly didn’t think there was any possibility that that was going to happen,” he told EW’s Karen Valby this morning. “And I thought they’d finished announcing the names so I wasn’t even nervous. … I just sort of tuned out and then I just heard my name out of the back of my head and I went into a black-out.”

If you’re three particular veteran directors … it didn’t feel quite so great.

The Beasts of the Southern Wild director wasn’t considered a favorite at all for a best director nomination … And where was Argo‘s Ben Affleck, Zero Dark Thirty‘s Kathryn Bigelow, and Les Miserables‘ Tom Hooper?

The directing category provided the most shocks, differing from the Directors Guild Awards contenders not just by one (which is typical) but by three. The other two surprises in addition to Zeitlin: Silver Linings Playbook‘s David O. Russell and Amour‘s Michael Haneke.

Here’s a breakdown of how some of the top categories shook out: READ FULL STORY

National Society of Film Critics name 'Amour' best picture

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The National Society of Film Critics selected Amour as the best picture of 2012 during its annual meeting Saturday.

The critics chose the star of Amour, Emmanuelle Riva, as the best actress, and Daniel Day-Lewis was chosen best actor for Lincoln.

The group of 60 prominent movie critics from around the country met at Lincoln Center in New York City to make its picks.

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Academy Award for foreign language film nets a record 71 submissions

For the first time in Academy Award history, 71 countries are vying for the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film. The submissions for 2012 include director Michael Haneke’s Amour, which won the Palme d’Or at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival; France’s global box office sensation The Intouchables; and Nairobi Half Life, the first film ever submitted by Kenya. Check out the full list below:  READ FULL STORY

Toronto Oscar Watch: 'Silver Linings Playbook,' 'The Sessions' and more

The last 48 hours of the Toronto International Film Festival produced another full crop of potential awards-baiting films. Here’s what has Oscar watchers buzzing up here.

Silver Linings Playbook Along with Argo, David O. Russell’s family study is the one film that’s attracted the most Oscar buzz so far. Uproariously funny and surprisingly moving as well, this is a character piece that hits all the right notes and should be a home run with the Academy. I could easily see nominations for Best Picture, actor (Bradley Cooper), actress (Jennifer Lawrence), and supporting actor (Robert De Niro) along with dual citations for Russell for writing and directing.

The Sessions After its successful Sundance debut (where it was called The Surrogate), John Hawkes and Helen Hunt’s sexually frank drama played here to wonderful response. Hawkes (in the lead category) and Hunt (in supporting) seem like sure bets for nominations, and their strong buzz could even help the film become a Best Picture contender. READ FULL STORY

Telluride Film Festival announces line-up: 'Hyde Park on Hudson,' 'Amour,' 'Love, Marilyn'

The 39th Telluride Film Festival announced the lineup of its main program today, featuring a mix of premieres and previous festival favorites. The 25 films include Hyde Park on Hudson, starring Bill Murray as President Franklin D. Roosevelt (directed by Roger Michell); At Any Price, starring Dennis Quaid and Zac Efron as father and son farmers (directed by Ramin Bahrani); Frances Ha, starring Greta Gerwig, who also co-wrote the screenplay with director Noah Baumbach; Love, Marilyn, a documentary featuring a roster of actresses reading notes, letters, and poems penned by Marilyn Monroe (directed by Liz Garbus); and the Cannes Palme d’Or winner Amour (directed by Michael Haneke).  READ FULL STORY

Cannes: Robert Pattinson plays a lethal finance bad boy in David Cronenberg's 'Cosmopolis.' Plus, a Palme d'Or conspiracy theory

David Cronenberg is often the kind of director who makes art when he thinks he’s going mainstream (A Dangerous Method, The Fly) and winds up with a crock when he thinks he’s making art (the inexplicable 1996 Cannes Special Jury Prize winner Crash). Cosmopolis, which premiered this morning, may star the Most Coveted Sexy Franchise Heartthrob in the Universe, Robert Pattinson, but it is nevertheless in the icy, stultifying tradition of such hermetically sealed Cronenberg duds as M. Butterfly and Videodrome. For most of this one, we’re sealed in a white stretch limousine, the interiors of which Cronenberg shoots from symmetrical low angles, so that it feels as if we’re caught inside a black-leather rectangular room. Pattinson plays Eric Packer, a 28-year-old billionaire assets manager who orders his chauffeur to take him across Manhattan for a haircut. He stops and gets out for occasional meals in upscale coffee shops, but mostly, seated in his luxe chamber of a car, he hectors an underling (Jay Baruchel), has sex with one of his mistresses (Juliette Binoche), and holds court on the brave new world of cyber-capitalism, with its liquidly opaque digital ethereality and indomitable new breed of global-transactional high flier. READ FULL STORY

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