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Tag: Amy Adams (1-10 of 40)

Casting Net: Amy Adams in talks for sci-fi thriller; Plus, Emily Blunt, more

• Amy Adams (American Hustle) is in early talks to star in Story of Your Life, a sci-fi thriller based on a Ted Chiang short story about a linguist who is hired to determine whether the aliens who have just landed on Earth are a threat. During her communication with the visitors, she beings to experience visions that help her determine why they are there. Denis Villeneuve (Prisoners) will direct off of a script from Eric Heisserer (Final Destination 5). [Deadline] READ FULL STORY

David O. Russell talks about 'American Hustle,' being 'reborn' as a director -- EXCLUSIVE

American Hustle director David O. Russell likes sports analogies, which are actually surprisingly helpful in trying to describe his theory on aggressively spontaneous acting. “You see a batter or a basketball player when they’re stuck on something in their heads, that’s not good,” says Russell, who’s “coached” the casts of his last three movies to 11 Oscar nominations, including statues for Christian Bale (The Fighter), Jennifer Lawrence (The Silver Linings Playbook), and Melissa Leo (The Fighter). “Once you have a good focus, you want to keep it. You want to stay in that zone, so you want to work briskly and from instinct. It’s almost like a superstitious thing.”

There’s nothing superstitious, however, about Russell’s recent run of success. American Hustle, which arrived on Blu-ray on Tuesday, was his biggest box-office hit of his career. The star-studded 1970s period piece about a married conman (Christian Bale) and his lover (Amy Adams) who are manipulated by an ambitious FBI agent (Bradley Cooper) to create an ABSCAM-like sting to implicate corrupt government officials, including the mayor of Camden, New Jersey (Jeremy Renner), was an actors’ showcase that also included Lawrence, Robert De Niro, and Jack Huston. The laugh-filled drama landed 10 Oscar nominations, and Russell became the first director to ever direct a film with four actors earning Oscar nominations in each of the acting categories, twice — much less back-to-back.

Russell plans to stay in his zone. He’s currently writing another script for Lawrence, as well as “another big story I’m writing for many of these cast members that I don’t want to talk about yet.”

But he’s happy to talk about American Hustle, which character he thinks is the heart of the film, his unique approach to directing actors, and his understanding that all his success can vanish tomorrow. READ FULL STORY

'American Hustle' Blu-ray: Christian Bale urges Amy Adams to 'cry British' -- EXCLUSIVE DELETED SCENE

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Because of David O. Russell’s spontaneous directing style, a movie like American Hustle is sure to be a treasure trove of deleted scenes. As such, fans of the hit movie, which grossed $149.3 million and earned 10 Oscar nominations, will not be disappointed by the new Blu-ray, out Tuesday, March 18. For a movie that is so much about the acting, it’s fascinating to see the slight variations and wrinkles that the cast experiments with in the 11 deleted or extended scenes.

Remember the montage where Jennifer Lawrence housecleans to “Live and Let Die” as her husband’s elaborately orchestrated ruse begins to unravel — due to her lack of discretion? Well, the Blu-ray has that entire lip-synced performance, as well as a similar version set to Santana’s “Evil Ways.”

There’s also an epilogue for the film that features voiceover from Jeremy Renner’s convicted Camden mayor. Renner was the odd-actor out when it came to year-end awards, but for my money, his performance was one of the film’s highlights. More than any of the other characters, I thought Renner’s Mayor Carmine Polito, who’s sucked into the FBI sting arranged by compromised cons Irving Rosenfeld (Bale) and Sydney Prosser (Adams), really existed in this world — even if his hair defied gravity.

Perhaps Renner’s final soliloquy was cut because the story truly belongs to Irving and Sydney, two partners in love and crime who are only slightly smarter than the feds on their tail. In this exclusive deleted scene, filmed during the sequence where Sydney — or Lady Edith Greensly — vows to use all of her charm to con Richie (Bradley Cooper) after Irving refuses to leave the country with her, Irving pleads with her to finish this one last scam as the British lady she pretends to be. “You have to hold on to what we made,” he says before pleading. “You can cry British.”

Watch the scene below: READ FULL STORY

Casting Net: Jake Gyllenhaal to play a Prohibition Era drifter; Plus, Liam Neeson re-teams with Martin Scorsese, more

• Jake Gyllenhaal and Amy Adams will play Prohibition Era lovers (or, potential mates) in Ezekiel Moss. Philip Seymour Hoffman has been attached to direct the pic for some time off of Keith Bunin’s Black List script. The story revolves around Iris (Adams) a widower who runs a boarding house to support her son Joel in a small, religious town. She falls for a drifter, Gyllenhaal’s Ezekiel Moss, who can “channel and physically inhabit the spirits of the dead.” [THR]

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Amy Adams wins Best Actress in a Comedy at Golden Globes

http://img2.timeinc.net/ew/i/2014/01/12/amy-adams-05_100x100.jpgAmy Adams won the Golden Globe for Best Actress in a Comedy/Musical for her work in American Hustle. Earlier in the show, American Hustle co-star Jennifer Lawrence won for her work as well in David O. Russell’s film.

“David, you write such amazing roles for women,” Adams said in her speech. “Thanks for letting the world know that a princess can punch and wear an amazing dress.”

This is Adams’ fifth nomination and first win at the Globes.

Does Scarlett Johansson deserve awards recognition for 'Her'? Co-stars Rooney Mara, Amy Adams weigh in

Scarlett Johansson was nowhere to be found at the Directors Guild of America premiere of Her Thursday night in Los Angeles.

It was almost too poignant an absence, considering Johansson plays the disembodied operating system of our dreams in Spike Jonze’s futuristic love story. As Samantha, Johansson could only rely on her voice — silences and subtle inflections and all — to make us believe that Joaquin Phoenix’s Theodore could possibly fall in love with a computer program. She doesn’t even have the benefit of an animated avatar.

Though she’s getting raves for her unconventional but affecting performance, the question of the season is whether or not that counts as an awards-eligible performance. The Golden Globes already said no, even though they gave Her a Best Picture nod. The Screen Actors Guild could have included Johansson in their Best Supporting Actress roundup, but, ultimately, she didn’t make the cut. Same with the Independent Spirit Awards. Now, her only chance to be recognized for the part is the Oscars.

Johansson’s co-stars weighed in on the lingering question at Thursday’s premiere.

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On the scene with Amy Adams, Bradley Cooper, Louis C.K., and David O. Russell at the 'American Hustle' premiere

Damn, it must feel good to be a hustler. Coming off a  New York Film Critics Circle best picture win and whispers of Oscars buzzing in the air, the stars of American Hustle celebrated the film’s world premiere Sunday night at New York’s Ziegfeld Theater.

Inspired by the 1978 Abscam scandal in which the FBI set up a sting operation to capture corrupt political officials, the dramedy started off as a kernel of an idea in the mind of screenwriter and executive producer Eric Warren Singer 15 years ago. But for him, the movie all started with one character — irresistibly charming con man Irving Rosenfeld, played by Christian Bale. READ FULL STORY

'American Hustle' TV spot: 'Good Times Bad Times' for Christian Bale and Amy Adams -- VIDEO

Sometimes, the right song can make all the difference to establishing a mood for a movie. But the absolutely perfect song can go even further and provide meaning. Director David O. Russell is a connoisseur of music, so it’s probably no accident that the TV spots for his upcoming movie, American Hustle, are set to Led Zeppelin’s “Good Times Bad Times.” Yes, it immediately evokes the setting of the film — the 1970s. But the lyrics are even more insightful for his characters, a coterie of ne’er-do-well con artists, corrupt pols, and compromised cops.

“In the days of my youth, I was told what it means to be a man,
Now I’ve reached that age, I’ve tried to do all those things the best I can.
No matter how I try, I find my way into the same old jam.”

The latest TV spot, titled “Unexpected,” showcases Christian Bale as an amusing con-man hanging on by a thread — much like his marvelous comb-over.

Click below for the latest Zeppelin inspired teaser for American Hustle, which opens in theaters on Dec. 13. READ FULL STORY

'Man of Steel' Blu-ray: The Superman story that needed to be told -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

“He’s the king of all superheroes. He exists in a weird way outside of comic-book culture.” — Zack Snyder

If Man of Steel wasn’t the king of all superhero movies, it was still an ambitious and exciting starting point for a new take on our most iconic caped character. Henry Cavill’s son of Krypton is an alien — always has been — and as writer David Goyer explains in an exclusive bonus video from the new Blu-ray, the Superman story that demanded to be told was one of first-contact. “You’re the answer,” Jonathan Kent (Kevin Costner) tells his adopted son in the film. “You’re the answer to, ‘Are we alone in the universe?’”

In a lot of ways, and most certainly for the future of DC Comics’ grand plan, Superman is a giant gateway. His very existence opens the doors to a bigger, almost infinite, universe that an established — but Earth-bound — box-office brawler like Batman can’t really deliver, and Man of Steel set the table. Perhaps Superman is that White Knight that Bruce Wayne once envisioned who would make Batman’s burden unnecessary — but we know it won’t be a smooth or cordial handover in the upcoming sequel, Batman Vs. Superman.

In the exclusive video below from the Man of Steel Blu-ray, which arrives Nov. 11, the cast and crew discuss the never-ending obsession with the character of Superman. Love, like, or simply shrug at this past summer’s reboot, it’s difficult not to be excited about the next chapter.
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On the scene with Spike Jonze, Joaquin Phoenix, Rooney Mara, and more at the premiere of 'Her'

The New York Film Festival screened Spike Jonze’s Her – his first solo writing feature — on its closing night, Oct. 12. Jonze, along with cast members Joaquin Phoenix, Amy Adams, Rooney Mara, and Olivia Wilde, arrived on the red carpet at Alice Tully Hall to celebrate the film’s world premiere.

The movie centers on Phoenix’s Theodore Twombly, a lonely, big-hearted man who falls in love with his Siri-like operating system “Samantha” (smokily voiced by Scarlett Johansson) while coping with his recent divorce. Set in a futuristic version of Los Angeles, Theodore works as a ghost writer for BeautifulHandwrittenLetters.com, dictating heartfelt missives from loved ones who can’t string the words together themselves. Sensitive and reclusive, he finds fulfillment through his complicated relationship with “Samantha.”

For director Jonze, the premiere was a special homecoming. “The New York Film Festival means a lot to me,” Jonze said before the screening. “This is where I got to premiere my first film, Being John Malkovich.” Accompanied by his family and most of his cast — except Johansson, who “is in the ether with us as she is in the movie,” he said — Jonze presented his highly anticipated film to a full house.

Though Phoenix showed up to the premiere with Jonze, the elusive actor didn’t stop for comments on the red carpet, instead racing inside early. But Mara, who plays a pivotal, albeit small, role as Theodore’s ex-wife, gamely talked about her part and how Theodore’s lengthy, but failed relationship with her character drives his need. “You see our relationship unfold,” Mara told EW. “We’ve been together many, many years, and you see all the stages of it.”

In fact, Jonze was reluctant to cast Mara as Theodore’s heartbreak because she seemed too young for Phoenix. “Joaquin is older than me, but he feels kind of young, he has a young spirit,” Mara said. “When I read the script, it was just so powerful, I loved it so much, so even though Spike thought I was too young, I went after it and convinced him to hire me.”

Kent Jones, the festival’s director of programming, echoed Mara while introducing Her: “[Spike] made a film that, when we saw it, we instantly fell in love with,” he said. Jones added that the selection committee wanted the film to close the festival because it mixed lighthearted humor with deeply haunting themes of human emotion, loneliness, and melancholy.

And with the diverse subject matter covered in Her, Mara said, it’s tough to pinpoint just one lesson from Theodore’s relationships.

“There’s so many thought-provoking ideas, and I don’t think there’s one thing to take away from it,” the actress said, shaking her head. “Every day while shooting it, I would drive home and have a million things running through my head about relationships, about everything; I think that’s kind of what happens when you see the film as well.”

Her opens in select theaters Dec. 18 and nationwide Jan. 10, 2014.

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