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Tag: Animation (31-40 of 221)

'Coraline': Neil Gaiman and Travis Knight talk adaptation, scaring kids, and more at EW's CapeTown Film Festival

The penultimate day of EW’s inaugural CapeTown Film Festival featured a Q&A with rock star of fantastical literature Neil Gaiman following a screening of Coraline, the animated adaptation of his 2002 book of the same name.

Gaiman, along with the film’s lead animator, Travis Knight, told the audience at the Egyptian Theatre about the difficulties of finding a studio to back Coraline, the film’s animation methods, and why scaring kids is a good thing. Read on for five things we learned from the discussion led by EW’s Geoff Boucher. READ FULL STORY

25 great one-liners from 'Who Framed Roger Rabbit' -- VIDEO

When Who Framed Roger Rabbit sprang into theaters in the summer of 1988, animation was as beleaguered as ol’ Wily E. Coyote. These were the dark days of Disney’s The Great Mouse Detective and Universal’s An American Tale, which only seemed to prove that the glory years of cartoon mice and other fuzzy critters had finally run its course. But Robert Zemeckis’s Roger Rabbit changed everything, practically overnight. Much was made of the novelty of combining live-action with animated characters, but Mary Poppins had mixed both a quarter century earlier — and Bert and his dancing penguins were hardly the first themselves. No, what really made Roger Rabbit a hit with audiences of all ages was the come-together moment from all the iconic ‘toons that had thrilled generations of children. It was like “We Are the World,” but instead of Bob Dylan and Ray Charles, there was Daffy and Donald Duck squaring off against each other on dueling pianos and there was Mickey and Bugs free-falling with Eddie (Bob Hoskins) from the top of a skyscraper.

Throw in a new wascally-wabbit named Roger and his ahh-OOOOOOOO-gaa femme fatale of a wife (voiced by Kathleen Turner), and Who Framed Roger Rabbit became the first animated movie to make the year’s top-10 box-office list in more than a decade. The next year, Disney would present The Little Mermaid, which would confirm the resurgence of animation and set the course towards the new golden age that has lasted until the present day.

Tomorrow, Roger Rabbit arrives on Blu-ray for the first time, and even though the new 25th Anniversary Edition doesn’t include any new special features, it’s a delight to revisit Toontown and get hit on the head a few times with some classic Acme-brand laughs. Below, check out 25 great one-liners from the crazy, loony, genius movie that can’t help but make you feel like you’re nine years old again. READ FULL STORY

Still Bakshi after all these years: Iconoclastic 'Fritz the Cat' director has another tale to tell -- EXCLUSIVE PHOTO

“Hey people, Ralphie needs money to draw. Let’s give him some so he can make a fool of himself again.” — Ralph Bakshi’s Miss America, in the Kickstarter campaign video for his new animated project

Making films has never been easy for Ralph Bakshi. The maverick cartoonist and filmmaker, who became famous — and infamous — after 1972′s smash X-rated ‘toon, Fritz the Cat, never liked to color within the lines, so to speak. He was the anti-Disney back then, filling his stories with provocative themes, raunchy humor, and curvacious broads that would make Russ Meyer blush. His bold 1975 blaxploitation satire Coonskin was driven from some theaters by critics who deemed its racial elements offensive, but filmmakers like Quentin Tarantino adored the film, and Bakshi’s artistic style and spirit lived on in the work of admirers who went on to make cartoons like The Simpsons, Ren & Stimpy, and Rango.

Now 74 years old, Bakshi has been in exile for more than a decade, focusing on his painting at his New Mexico home after one-too-many frustrating and disappointing Hollywood experiences. He hasn’t made a feature film since 1992′s Cool World, and he seemed to call it quits for good after his short-lived HBO series Spicy City went belly-up in 1997. But he still has a story to tell — a great one, he says, that will “push the boundaries of 2-D animation.” READ FULL STORY

Oscars 2013: The full winners list

Just as viewers seemed divided over Seth MacFarlane’s hosting of this year’s Oscars, so Academy voters were split over the films themselves. Django Unchained, Les Miserables, Amour, Lincoln, and Silver Linings Playbook all scored major awards, with Jennifer Lawrence and Daniel Day-Lewis winning the top acting Oscars. But Life of Pi director Ang Lee took home the Best Director prize while Argo won Best Picture. You can check out the full list of winners below.

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Martin Freeman, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, 2013 Oscar nominees honored at Shorts Awards

Martin Freeman starred in one of the lengthiest movies of 2012, but Friday night he was honored for his work in films with much shorter runtimes and much smaller budgets than the 169-minute-long Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. At the third annual ShortsHD Shorts Awards, Freeman picked up the Visionary Actor Award.

The English actor has continued to make short films, even after performing in high-profile projects like BBC’s Sherlock and The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

“I love doing [short films] for the same reason that everyone in this room really likes them – because very often it’s the time that you get to really express an idea or ideas without someone breathing down your neck or without someone arguing about how big your trailer is,” Freeman told the audience gathered at the Paley Center for Media last night. “No one’s getting rich or famous out of it, but people are actually trying to express something – and it doesn’t take 18 months like The Hobbit does.” READ FULL STORY

Give Maggie Simpson an Oscar! Watch nominated short 'The Longest Daycare' -- VIDEO

Can a yellow-skinned, pacifier-loving baby defeat four fierce foes — including a swoon-inducing urban fairy tale from Disney — at the Academy Awards?

We won’t know for sure until Sunday, when this year’s Oscars — including the prize for Best Animated Short Film — are handed out in Los Angeles. In the meantime, audiences can content themselves with watching that baby’s Academy-approved short film on Hulu. “The Longest Daycare” finds mute, cute Maggie Simpson grappling with her unibrowed arch-nemesis at the Ayn Rand School for Tots. Though the David Silverman-directed short originally appeared in 3-D before theatrical screenings of Ice Age: Continental Drift, you’ll have to be satisfied with this two-dimensional rendering:

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'Wreck-it Ralph' Blu-ray: Jane Lynch on her curves, stealing the guys' roles, and working with Harrison Ford on 'The Fugitive' -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

After four seasons as Sue Sylvester on Glee, Jane Lynch has gone from sitcom guest-star extraordinaire and comic dynamite in films like Best in Show and The 40-Year-Old Virgin to one of television’s most recognizable and celebrated actors, hosting the Emmys and Saturday Night Live. But way back when, she paid the bills with her clipped Midwestern voice, in numerous commercials and animated cartoons. “I made my living doing voiceovers, and getting an animated film was always the brass ring of being a celebrity,” says Lynch. “So now I’m just really grateful that I’m a celebrity and I get to do it. I’ve always loved it.”

In Wreck-it Ralph, the Disney animated blockbuster that mashes together worlds of familiar-looking arcade classics, Lynch voices Sergeant Calhoun, the voluptuous battlefield leader from the Halo-type game, Hero’s Duty. Sue Sylvester would be proud — judging by her gruff demeanor, Calhoun might just be related to R. Lee Ermey’s sergeant from Full Metal Jacket — but she’s not dressed in anything from Sylvester’s wardrobe. Calhoun’s leather and armor outfit shields a body that makes Lara Croft look like Peter Pan.

It’s no wonder that goody-two-shoes Fix-it Felix (Jack McBrayer) falls for her. When big-lug Ralph (John C. Reilly) grows weary of his villainous role in his video-game and sneaks into Hero’s Duty to earn a medal, he threatens to unplug both games forever. Calhoun and Felix team up to bring Ralph back home before their worlds are officially Game Over.

With Wreck-it Ralph already available as a digital download and due on Blu-ray and DVD on March 5, Lynch spoke to EW about her resemblance to Calhoun, her hopes to reunite with Christopher Guest, and how much she was paid to act opposite Harrison Ford 20 years ago. Then view an exclusive behind-the-scenes extra that explains the inspiration for Calhoun’s terrifying alien world.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Congratulations on the Best Animated Film Oscar nomination for Wreck-it Ralph. Do voice actors get to attend the Oscar ceremony?
JANE LYNCH: They do not, sadly.

That doesn’t seem fair. I was really looking forward to seeing you walk the red carpet dressed as Sgt. Calhoun.
I did that on Ellen. You’ll have to check that out. I went as Sgt. Calhoun for Halloween and I wore it on Ellen. READ FULL STORY

Oscars 2013: A close-up look at the animated short nominees

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Man’s best friend, guacamole, marriage, Ayn Rand and paper airplanes are just a few of the subjects tackled in this year’s lineup of Oscar-nominated animated shorts.

All these films have in common is that they’re under 40 minutes long and created through some form of animation.  Otherwise, the films are wildly different in both tone and technique. Some are stop-motion films, some are hand-drawn, others computer-generated — and one is a hybrid.

As you get ready to fill out your own personal Oscar ballot, here’s a look at the funny, sweet, and serene stories facing off in the animated shorts category this year.

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'Paperman': Watch the step-by-step animation process for Disney's Oscar-nominated short -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

Paperman

Disney’s charming short film up for an Oscar this year, Paperman, is a nostalgic return to the tradition of 2-D, hand-drawn animation that also embraces what modern 3-D animation technology has to offer.

The short is a little urban fairy tale about a man who attempts to capture the attention of the woman of his dreams with paper airplanes he launches from his skyscraper office to hers. It was made with new in-house software called Meander that enables a hybrid approach to animation, where characters and backgrounds are drawn over an initial digital layer.

To see that innovative new animation method in action, check out the EW exclusive video below, a progression reel displaying the process of creating one shot in Paperman.

SPOILER ALERT! Do yourself a favor and watch the entire six-and-a-half-minute short here before watching the reel below that reveals a key moment in the film. READ FULL STORY

Focus Features to release animated pic 'The Boxtrolls' with Tracy Morgan

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On the heels of ParaNorman’s success, Focus Features has just closed a deal to release their third animated feature: The Boxtrolls. The film will be a 3-D stop motion and CG hybrid feature and is currently in production at LAIKA (the studio behind ParaNorman and Coraline) with a high-profile voice cast including Tracy Morgan, Toni Collette, Ben Kingsley, Jared Harris, Simon Pegg, and Elle Fanning.

Based on Here Be Monsters!, Alan Snow’s bestselling children’s novel, the film is set in the wealth, status, and cheese-obsessed town of Cheesebridge. The Boxtrolls are a group of trolls who live underground and come out at night to steal precious cheeses from the townspeople. When Archibald Snatcher (Kingsley) decides to eliminate the misunderstood creatures and it’s up to a young human girl (Fanning) to help the town and its underground dwellers find peace.

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