Inside Movies Breaking Movie News and Scoops | Movie Reviews

Tag: Animation (41-50 of 235)

John Goodman on his 'Monsters' hit, working with George Clooney again, and a return to 'SNL'

For a ubiquitous character actor who’s been working pretty much non-stop for 30 years in movies and television — including a heralded nine-season run on Roseanne — John Goodman is in the midst of one of the most successful stretches of his career. His most obvious score is Monsters University, the Pixar prequel to the 2001 smash that opened this weekend with $82 million, making it the fourth biggest animated-film debut in history. Goodman’s blue-furred Sully reunited with Billy Crystal’s one-eyed, walking green-pea Mike for the story of how the odd couple first met in college — when Sully was a lazy BMOC and Mike was an overachieving go-getter intent on becoming the scariest of Scarers.

But then there’s also Goodman’s recent on-camera work, which has included supporting roles in the last two Academy Award Best Pictures winners — The Artist and Argo — as well as a scene-stealing appearance opposite Denzel Washington in last year’s Flight. Throw in upcoming roles in the Coen brothers’ Inside Llewyn Davis and George Clooney’s World War II drama, Monuments Men, and Goodman just might be on course for an elusive but long-overdue Oscar nomination. (See also: Barton Fink.) “Right now, I’m at the high point of the roller coaster, but it’s always going to dip,” says Goodman. “So I’m just out there trying to enjoy it while it lasts.”

Click below for more from Goodman. READ FULL STORY

Box office preview: 'Monsters University' eyes a monstrous debut; 'World War Z' hopes to go viral

MONSTERS-UNIVERSITY-TRAILER.jpg

Superman came, saw, and conquered the box office last weekend — soaring to the best June opening of all time. But this time around, Man of Steel has some super-size competition. Monsters University and World War Z are hitting theaters, and both are on track to have very healthy debuts. The box office has never seen three movies earn more than $50 million in one weekend before — but there’s a chance that could happen for the fist time this year.

Here’s how I think the weekend might play out:
READ FULL STORY

Casting Net: Carey Mulligan is front-runner to play Hillary Rodham Clinton; Plus James Franco, Javier Bardem, Emmy Rossum, and more

A handful of American actresses have been rumored to be in consideration for the role of Hillary Rodham Clinton in upcoming biopic RodhamScarlett Johansson, Jessica Chastain, Reese Witherspoon, Amanda Seyfried, and Emma Stone, most prominently. But now a front-runner has emerged: British actress Carey Mulligan, who most recently starred as Daisy Buchanan in The Great Gatsby. Mulligan hasn’t officially announced her candidacy for the role of the former first lady, New York senator, and secretary of state, but THR reports that the 28-year-old actress will soon meet with director James Ponsoldt (The Spectacular Now) about the project. Rodham will focus on the early years of Clinton’s career, including meeting future president Bill Clinton and her position as a lawyer on the committee involved in Richard Nixon’s impeachment. [THR]

READ FULL STORY

Box office preview: How fast will 'Fast & Furious 6' make $100 million?

fast-furious-6-box-office.jpg

This weekend is the summer’s biggest box office head-to-head, with both The Hangover Part III and Fast & Furious 6 opening. Well, technically Hangover is opening on Thursday. (And we can’t forget about Epic!) Both films come out of multi-multi-million dollar franchises; both cost multi-multi millions to make. And both have a really good chance of making more than $200 million at the box office. But now that the actual weekend has arrived, it’s safe to say that one will emerge the clear winner…and it’s going to be Fast 6.

Here’s how the box office may play this weekend:

READ FULL STORY

'Coraline': Neil Gaiman and Travis Knight talk adaptation, scaring kids, and more at EW's CapeTown Film Festival

The penultimate day of EW’s inaugural CapeTown Film Festival featured a Q&A with rock star of fantastical literature Neil Gaiman following a screening of Coraline, the animated adaptation of his 2002 book of the same name.

Gaiman, along with the film’s lead animator, Travis Knight, told the audience at the Egyptian Theatre about the difficulties of finding a studio to back Coraline, the film’s animation methods, and why scaring kids is a good thing. Read on for five things we learned from the discussion led by EW’s Geoff Boucher. READ FULL STORY

25 great one-liners from 'Who Framed Roger Rabbit' -- VIDEO

When Who Framed Roger Rabbit sprang into theaters in the summer of 1988, animation was as beleaguered as ol’ Wily E. Coyote. These were the dark days of Disney’s The Great Mouse Detective and Universal’s An American Tale, which only seemed to prove that the glory years of cartoon mice and other fuzzy critters had finally run its course. But Robert Zemeckis’s Roger Rabbit changed everything, practically overnight. Much was made of the novelty of combining live-action with animated characters, but Mary Poppins had mixed both a quarter century earlier — and Bert and his dancing penguins were hardly the first themselves. No, what really made Roger Rabbit a hit with audiences of all ages was the come-together moment from all the iconic ‘toons that had thrilled generations of children. It was like “We Are the World,” but instead of Bob Dylan and Ray Charles, there was Daffy and Donald Duck squaring off against each other on dueling pianos and there was Mickey and Bugs free-falling with Eddie (Bob Hoskins) from the top of a skyscraper.

Throw in a new wascally-wabbit named Roger and his ahh-OOOOOOOO-gaa femme fatale of a wife (voiced by Kathleen Turner), and Who Framed Roger Rabbit became the first animated movie to make the year’s top-10 box-office list in more than a decade. The next year, Disney would present The Little Mermaid, which would confirm the resurgence of animation and set the course towards the new golden age that has lasted until the present day.

Tomorrow, Roger Rabbit arrives on Blu-ray for the first time, and even though the new 25th Anniversary Edition doesn’t include any new special features, it’s a delight to revisit Toontown and get hit on the head a few times with some classic Acme-brand laughs. Below, check out 25 great one-liners from the crazy, loony, genius movie that can’t help but make you feel like you’re nine years old again. READ FULL STORY

Still Bakshi after all these years: Iconoclastic 'Fritz the Cat' director has another tale to tell -- EXCLUSIVE PHOTO

“Hey people, Ralphie needs money to draw. Let’s give him some so he can make a fool of himself again.” — Ralph Bakshi’s Miss America, in the Kickstarter campaign video for his new animated project

Making films has never been easy for Ralph Bakshi. The maverick cartoonist and filmmaker, who became famous — and infamous — after 1972’s smash X-rated ‘toon, Fritz the Cat, never liked to color within the lines, so to speak. He was the anti-Disney back then, filling his stories with provocative themes, raunchy humor, and curvacious broads that would make Russ Meyer blush. His bold 1975 blaxploitation satire Coonskin was driven from some theaters by critics who deemed its racial elements offensive, but filmmakers like Quentin Tarantino adored the film, and Bakshi’s artistic style and spirit lived on in the work of admirers who went on to make cartoons like The Simpsons, Ren & Stimpy, and Rango.

Now 74 years old, Bakshi has been in exile for more than a decade, focusing on his painting at his New Mexico home after one-too-many frustrating and disappointing Hollywood experiences. He hasn’t made a feature film since 1992’s Cool World, and he seemed to call it quits for good after his short-lived HBO series Spicy City went belly-up in 1997. But he still has a story to tell — a great one, he says, that will “push the boundaries of 2-D animation.” READ FULL STORY

Oscars 2013: The full winners list

Just as viewers seemed divided over Seth MacFarlane’s hosting of this year’s Oscars, so Academy voters were split over the films themselves. Django Unchained, Les Miserables, Amour, Lincoln, and Silver Linings Playbook all scored major awards, with Jennifer Lawrence and Daniel Day-Lewis winning the top acting Oscars. But Life of Pi director Ang Lee took home the Best Director prize while Argo won Best Picture. You can check out the full list of winners below.

READ FULL STORY

Martin Freeman, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, 2013 Oscar nominees honored at Shorts Awards

Martin Freeman starred in one of the lengthiest movies of 2012, but Friday night he was honored for his work in films with much shorter runtimes and much smaller budgets than the 169-minute-long Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. At the third annual ShortsHD Shorts Awards, Freeman picked up the Visionary Actor Award.

The English actor has continued to make short films, even after performing in high-profile projects like BBC’s Sherlock and The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

“I love doing [short films] for the same reason that everyone in this room really likes them – because very often it’s the time that you get to really express an idea or ideas without someone breathing down your neck or without someone arguing about how big your trailer is,” Freeman told the audience gathered at the Paley Center for Media last night. “No one’s getting rich or famous out of it, but people are actually trying to express something – and it doesn’t take 18 months like The Hobbit does.” READ FULL STORY

Give Maggie Simpson an Oscar! Watch nominated short 'The Longest Daycare' -- VIDEO

Can a yellow-skinned, pacifier-loving baby defeat four fierce foes — including a swoon-inducing urban fairy tale from Disney — at the Academy Awards?

We won’t know for sure until Sunday, when this year’s Oscars — including the prize for Best Animated Short Film — are handed out in Los Angeles. In the meantime, audiences can content themselves with watching that baby’s Academy-approved short film on Hulu. “The Longest Daycare” finds mute, cute Maggie Simpson grappling with her unibrowed arch-nemesis at the Ayn Rand School for Tots. Though the David Silverman-directed short originally appeared in 3-D before theatrical screenings of Ice Age: Continental Drift, you’ll have to be satisfied with this two-dimensional rendering:

READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Movies

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP