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Tag: Apocalypse Now (1-2 of 2)

Q&A: Francis Ford Coppola on George Lucas, an 'ambitious' new movie, and his five-film box set

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Francis Ford Coppola is ready for a big picture comeback.

The Oscar-winning filmmaker, now 73, has made some of the most iconic movies of all time, from 1972 mob classic The Godfather to 1979 war epic Apocalypse Now. But as an equally humble student and lover of film, he’s recently made smaller movies with tiny budgets such as 2009’s Tetro, starring Vincent Gallo, and murder mystery Twixt, with Val Kilmer and Elle Fanning.

Coppola spoke to EW about five of his films – Apocalypse Now, the extended version Apocalypse Now Redux, Tetro, 1974’s The Conversation, and 1982’s One From the Heart — all being released as a Blu-ray box set through Lionsgate on Tuesday. With new offices next year in Los Angeles on the Paramount Pictures lot, he also revealed his plans, and mentioned a first draft script, for a new “ambitious” big budget movie set in New York, as well as what he expects of his “kid brother” director George Lucas following the Disney- Lucasfilm acquisition. With the 2007 documentary Fog City Mavericks capturing the creative, independent spark of Bay Area filmmakers such as Coppola and Lucas, a new era for both has begun.
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Dennis Hopper was the most visionary of all Hollywood bad boys

dennis-hopperImage Credit: Everett CollectionIn a world of fake bad boys, he was the true article — a natural-born rule breaker, a Hollywood rebel who took midnight rides on the wild side with James Dean, a scraggly-haired hippie too hip (and too dark) to let the sunshine in. Dennis Hopper, who died Saturday at 74, was an actor and a filmmaker who tore through boundaries not just because he didn’t like them; most often, he didn’t even see them. I’ll never forget the one time I got to be in a room with him. It was August 1979, at the Saturday morning press conference after the very first American showing of Apocalypse Now. The screening had taken place the night before, at the Ziegfeld Theatre in Manhattan. I was a bratty college journalist who’d squeezed my way in and was still reeling from the movie: its hallucinatory power and majesty and violent strangeness. (The “Ride of the Valkyries” sequence was so indelible that it kept popping back into your mind’s eye, like your very own searing cinematic Vietnam flashback.)

At the press conference, they were mostly all there, the maverick artists who had toiled away on this movie for half a decade: Francis Ford Coppola, who took the opportunity to make his first feverish pronouncements on the brave new world of technology we were all about to enter (he called it “the communications revolution,” and though few knew what he was talking about, 30 years later, it’s clear that he was right); Robert Duvall and Martin Sheen, the latter of whom had priceless tales of working with the elephantine and eccentric Marlon Brando (who, naturally, hadn’t bothered to show up to talk to a bunch of journalists); and Hopper, who instantly took on the role of flaked-out druggie court jester of the press conference. The more stonerish and cosmic, and the less coherent, he was, the more that he ended up dominating the questions and answers, cracking up everyone in the room, though whether we were laughing with him or at him was, by the end, an open question. READ FULL STORY

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