Inside Movies Breaking Movie News and Scoops | Movie Reviews

Tag: August: Osage County (1-10 of 19)

Harvey Weinstein on disappointing Oscar showing for 'Osage County': 'I have only myself to blame'

August-Osage-County

One of the Oscar-season’s most anticipated films was August: Osage County, John Wells’ star-studded adaptation of Tracy Lett’s Pulitzer-Prize-winning play. But when it premiered at September’s Toronto Film Festival, it slipped significantly behind the competition, which included Gravity and 12 Years a Slave. Critics, in general, admired the film, but some sniffed at the perceived unrestrained performances, especially Meryl Streep’s unhinged matriarch. Producer Harvey Weinstein later admitted that he rushed the film in order to benefit from the heat of Toronto, a strategy that clearly backfired. Streep and Julia Roberts were nominated for Oscars, but the film was left out of the Best Picture race.

Now, Weinstein concedes he made a mistake, telling Deadline, “I do think we paid a price critically by rushing for Toronto. … I watched how David O. [Russell] and Marty [Scorsese] took the time they needed on their films, and imposed their strong will and vision in films that came out when they were ready. I have only myself to blame for pushing John Wells to try and be ready for a festival. It was my call, and it was not the right call.” READ FULL STORY

Box office report: 'Ride Along' dominates with $47.8 million, breaks January record

It’s good to be Kevin Hart and Ice Cube this weekend. The increasingly ubiquitous Hart, who recently told EW that Ride Along is “my baby,” scored big with a $41.2 million opening weekend for the buddy-cop comedy. That should jump to an estimated $47.8 million when one factors in the Monday MLK Jr. holiday. Not only does the impressive haul surpass expectations for Universal’s leanly budgeted $25 million comedy, but it also breaks the record for a January opening. (If you’re still not sold on the Hart/Cube pairing, whose chemistry lifted the film to an “A” approval rating with CinemaScore audiences, let this stupendous spot on Conan give you a taste of their chemistry.)

Universal folks have further reason to thrust their chests out this weekend. Buoyed by rapturous word of mouth, the studio’s real-SEAL heart-thumper Lone Survivor dropped just 38 percent to deliver an impressive $23.2 million in its fourth weekend. Director Peter Berg, whose Battleship bombed so badly, made Lone Survivor for $40 million and now can boast about a $74 million domestic total.

Sliding into the No. 3 spot is Open Road Films’ animated The Nut Job. With families looking for holiday entertainment, The Nut Job should swap places with Lone Survivor by the end of Monday. The squirrel comedy, which earned a solid “B” rating from CinemaScore audiences, managed to outperform its modest expectations.

Alas, the same can’t be said for Paramount’s stab at rebooting its Jack Ryan franchise, with Star Trek actor Chris Pine playing the action-hero CIA agent who’s previously been played by the likes of Alec Baldwin and Harrison Ford. Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit, which the studio made for $60 million, debuts at a rather limp No. 4 with just $17.2 million. A “B” CinemaScore rating shouldn’t do much to attract moviegoers distracted by all the Oscar-nominated films they want to see before the big show. That said, Shadow Recruit fared better overseas, with $22.2 million from only half of the international markets.

Frozen hung on in the No. 5 spot, with Disney’s domestic kitty now totaling nearly $333 million. But hot on its heels was American Hustle, which earned 10 Oscar nominations and last night walked away with a SAG award for best ensemble cast. David O. Russell’s caper, starring Christian Bale, Amy Adams, Bradley Cooper, and Jennifer Lawrence, enjoyed a 28 percent jump with a $10.6 million haul in its sixth weekend; its total gross rose to $116.4 million. The Meryl Streep/Julia Roberts family drama August: Osage County likewise enjoyed a jump in box office to $7.6 million as it more than doubled its theater count to 2,051; its cume stands at nearly $18.2 million.

The only other other notable new release is Devil’s Due, Eli Roth’s found-footage horror movie that was hoping to benefit from its mega-viral “Devil Baby” campaign. The film failed to crack the top 5 and earned a dismal “D+” CinemaScore rating. That’s a bleak showing, and yet the $7 million film already recouped its investment with an $8.5 million debut.

The top five:

1. Ride Along — $41.2 million

2. Lone Survivor — $23.2 million

3. The Nut Job — $20.55 million

4. Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit — $17.2 million

5. Frozen— $12 million

Box office report: 'Lone Survivor' sizzles with $38.5 million and rare A+ CinemaScore

Pete Berg’s gritty combat drama Lone Survivor accomplished its mission at the box office this weekend. The film, based on the true story of former Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell, grossed $38.5 million over the Friday-to-Sunday period, marking the second best January debut of all time after Cloverfield‘s $40.1 million bow in 2008. Audiences, which were 57 percent male and 57 percent 30 or older, issued Lone Survivor a rare “A+” CinemaScore grade, suggesting that Universal’s $40 million film will benefit from terrific word-of-mouth in the weeks to come.

Lone Survivor‘s success marks a major comeback for director Berg, whose last film, Battleship, opened to just $25 million against a whopping $209 million budget. Like that film, Lone also stars Friday Night Lights‘ Taylor Kitsch, though it was marketed primarily on the star power of its leading man, Mark Wahlberg. The Boston-born star has grown into a reliable box office draw, so its doubly impressive that Lone Survivor is one of his best-ever opening weekend results, trailing only 2012’s Ted, which started with $54.4 million. The film is a major win for all parties involved. READ FULL STORY

Box office report: 'The Hobbit' beats 'Frozen' with $29.9 million; '47 Ronin' bombs with $9.9 million

In a remarkably tight race, The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug held onto its gold at the box office this weekend, earning $29.9 million over the three-day frame and taking the top spot. The fantasy epic’s domestic total is now $190.3 million after three weeks, a robust number that still trails last year’s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, which had already earned $221.6 million at the 17-day mark. Peter Jackson’s earlier Tolkien epic, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, had made a princely $290.4 million by its third weekend in 2003, headed toward a final gross of $377.8 in the states and $1.119 billion worldwide. Smaug looks likely to end up below Unexpected Journey‘s total haul of $303 million, whereas each of the Lord of the Rings films managed to outgross its predecessor. The Hobbit: There and Back Again, the trilogy’s final film, is slated for release on Dec. 17, 2014.

The prize for Most Improved this week goes to Frozen, which jumped a remarkable 46.9 percent in its sixth weekend — despite actually playing at 205 fewer theaters. READ FULL STORY

'August: Osage County' trailer: 'You don't get a vote in who's in your family' -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

Family drama — just in time for the holidays.

In August: Osage Country, the star-studded adaptation of Tracy Letts’ Pulitzer-winning play about an Oklahoma family “marinating in its own miserablism,” as EW’s Owen Gleiberman referred to the plot in his review at the Toronto Film Festival, Meryl Streep portrays an aging matriarch presiding over her husband’s funeral. When her grown daughters — Julia Roberts, Juliette Lewis, and Julianne Nicholson — return home, verbal sparks fly as long-brewing conflicts and resentments come to a head.

In an exclusive trailer, below, check out press conference highlights from Streep, Roberts, and director John Wells about how the film came together. “You don’t get a vote in who’s in your family,” Streep explains in the clip. “And that is the story.”
READ FULL STORY

Julia Roberts attacks Meryl Streep in 'August: Osage County' poster -- PHOTO

August-Osage-County-Poster.jpg

Home is where the heart is.

That sounds so much better than “Home is where the bile ducts are,” but the latter anatomical metaphor seems better suited to August: Osage County, the star-studded adaptation of Tracy Letts’ Pulitzer-winning play about an Oklahoma family “marinating in its own miserablism,” as EW’s Owen Gleiberman so aptly phrased it.

In the film, which arrives on Christmas Day, Meryl Streep plays the harpyish matriarch who presides over her husband’s funeral — he committed suicide — and drives her three daughters up the wall. Julia Roberts, Juliette Lewis, and Julianne Nicholson play the daughters, who all drag their own adult baggage back into their childhood house.

Norman Rockwell would spit-take on his canvas when he sees the “family photo” that serves as the film’s poster.

Click below for the film’s trailer, which showcases the amazing supporting cast of Ewan McGregor, Chris Cooper, Abigail Breslin, Benedict Cumberbatch, Margo Martindale, Dermot Mulroney, Sam Shepard, and Misty Upham. READ FULL STORY

Watch the new 'August: Osage County' trailer -- VIDEO

August-Osage-County.jpg

There are some universal dreads in life: getting audited, getting dumped, oh and going back home to visit your parents.

Julia Roberts (as Barbara Weston) and Ewan McGregor (as Bill Fordham) know the feeling in the newest trailer for the John Wells-directed August: Osage County.

Their subject of dread? Roberts’ onscreen mother Meryl Streep (as a pill-popping, sharp-tongued Violet Weston).

Based on the Pulitzer-prize winning play by Tracy Letts, August: Osage County brings dysfunctional, feuding families to a whole new level. Especially with the boldface casting, including the likes of Sam Shepard, Chris Cooper, Juliette Lewis, Benedict Cumberbatch, and more. No wonder Julia Roberts called it “the best acting experience of her life.”

At least the palpable familial strife is quelled by the sweet sounds of The Lumineers’ “Stubborn Love.” Watch one of the most awkward family meals ever in the second trailer for August. (Check out the first one here.) READ FULL STORY

Toronto 2013: 'August: Osage County' is a feisty revel in family darkness

When a movie is based on a celebrated Broadway play, the first question you want to ask is pretty basic: Does it play? In the case of August: Osage County, an adaptation of Tracy Letts’ 2007 Pulitizer Prize-winning stage drama about a feisty Oklahoma family marinating in its own miserablism, the answer is a resounding yes. The fights and insults and sadistic parent-child mind games, the disease and addiction, the decades’ worth of gnarled domestic resentments, the powerhouse acting that sometimes shades into overacting (though in this case I’ll be damned if you could the draw the line)…the movie is red meat for anyone who thrives on confrontation and a certain brand of punchy, in-your-face emotional shock value. Yet the pull of what was happening on screen came, for me, with a major qualification: I went with it, I often enjoyed it, but I didn’t entirely buy it. As a play, August: Osage County might have been designed to make every last person who sees it think: “Thank God for my family! Looking at these raging Middle American crazies, I never realized how much I had to be grateful for!” Which is to say: The film, directed with head-on prosaic craft by John Wells (who made the very sharp downsizing drama The Company Men), is an extremely canny theatrical contraption that spreads its darkness like whipped butter on a roll. Is it a good movie? Let’s call it the feel-good feel-bad domestic snake-pit melodrama of the year. READ FULL STORY

Julia Roberts calls 'August: Osage County' 'the best acting experience' of her life

An exuberant Julia Roberts calls working on her latest film, August: Osage County, “the best acting experience of my life.”

The actress was bubbling with enthusiasm the day after the highly anticipated adaptation of Tracy Letts’ Pulitzer Prize-winning film premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival. In the film, Roberts plays the eldest daughter of a brutally honest matriarch, played by Meryl Streep.

“I’ve never worked so hard in my life – and I’ve given birth to three children,” Roberts told reporters Tuesday.

The large cast lived near the on-location set in Oklahoma, devoting themselves to capturing Letts’ dialogue. The film, to be released Dec. 25, drew mixed reviews at the festival but praise for its performances.

Toronto International Film Festival releases lineup

Kill-Your-Darlings.jpg

One thing is for certain: There will be a little something for everyone at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival. On Tuesday morning, the renowned festival released 70 titles set to hit the fest.

The titles with the most buzz include the Allen Ginsberg/Jack Kerouac/William Burroughs biopic Kill Your Darlings, which premiered at Sundance; August: Osage County, starring Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts and based on the Tony-winning play; the musical romance Can a Song Save Your Life?; and Steve McQueen’s slavery opus 12 Years a Slave, starring Chiwetel Ejofor, Michael Fassbender, and Benedict Cumberbatch.

In Special Presentations, first-time director Joseph Gordon-Levitt will show Don Jon, while Alfonso Cuaron’s eagerly awaited Gravity will also be presented. Blue Is the Warmest Color, the Palme d’Or-winning film from Abdellatif Kechiche, will show in the Special Presentations category as well.

Other titles released in the first round include:
READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Movies

Advertisement

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP