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Tag: Awards Season (1-10 of 339)

Queen Latifah to host the Hollywood Film Awards

No stranger to awards with an Oscar, Emmy, and Golden Globes nomination (and win) under her belt, Queen Latifah is set to host the inaugural broadcast of the Hollywood Film Awards, CBS announced Friday.

“Queen Latifah is the real deal,” said Jack Sussman, CBS’ executive vice president of specials, music and live events, in a statement. “She is a triple threat—she can act, she can sing, she can dance—she is beloved by audiences across multiple genres and she entertains millions of people every day.”

For her part, Latifah said she is “honored to be part of a legendary award show,” which has been kicking off awards season for the past 17 years, honoring films that are sometimes not even finished yet. It will air live (with a West Coast delay) on CBS from the Hollywood Palladium on November 14 and includes a live red carpet and post-show with CBS This Morning anchors Charlie Rose, Norah O’Donnell and Gayle King.

Neil Patrick Harris to host the Academy Awards

Neil Patrick Harris is not just one of those multi-hyphenate performers who could conceivably win an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony — he could also be the first to possibly score an EGOT through hosting.

The actor has signed on to emcee the upcoming Academy Awards, following his lively stints as host of two Emmy broadcasts and four Tonys, producers Neil Meron and Craig Zadan confirmed to EW.
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Record 83 countries to compete for Foreign Language Oscar

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced on Thursday the final submissions for the Foreign Language Film category for the 87th annual Academy Awards. A record 83 countries have entered a film for consideration, including Kosovo, Malta, Mauritania, and Panama for the first time. Notable selections include Xavier Dolan’s Canadian drama Mommy, a favorite at this year’s Cannes, Sweden’s Force Majeure, and the Russian retelling of the Book of Job, Leviathan, winner of the Best Screenplay award at Cannes.

Nominations will be announced on Thursday, Jan. 15, ahead of the live telecast on ABC Sunday, Feb. 22, from Hollywood. Last year’s award was won by the Italian film The Great Beauty.

Read the complete list of submissions below:

Afghanistan, “A Few Cubic Meters of Love,” Jamshid Mahmoudi, director;
Argentina, “Wild Tales,” Damián Szifrón, director;
Australia, “Charlie’s Country,” Rolf de Heer, director;
Austria, “The Dark Valley,” Andreas Prochaska, director;
Azerbaijan, “Nabat,” Elchin Musaoglu, director;
Bangladesh, “Glow of the Firefly,” Khalid Mahmood Mithu, director;
Belgium, “Two Days, One Night,” Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne, directors;
Bolivia, “Forgotten,” Carlos Bolado, director;
Bosnia and Herzegovina, “With Mom,” Faruk Lončarevič, director;
Brazil, “The Way He Looks,” Daniel Ribeiro, director;
Bulgaria, “Bulgarian Rhapsody,” Ivan Nitchev, director;
Canada, “Mommy,” Xavier Dolan, director;
Chile, “To Kill a Man,” Alejandro Fernández Almendras, director;
China, “The Nightingale,” Philippe Muyl, director;
Colombia, “Mateo,” María Gamboa, director;
Costa Rica, “Red Princesses,” Laura Astorga Carrera, director;
Croatia, “Cowboys,” Tomislav Mršić, director;
Cuba, “Conducta,” Ernesto Daranas Serrano, director;
Czech Republic, “Fair Play,” Andrea Sedláčková, director;
Denmark, “Sorrow and Joy,” Nils Malmros, director;
Dominican Republic, “Cristo Rey,” Leticia Tonos, director;
Ecuador, “Silence in Dreamland,” Tito Molina, director;
Egypt, “Factory Girl,” Mohamed Khan, director;
Estonia, “Tangerines,” Zaza Urushadze, director;
Ethiopia, “Difret,” Zeresenay Berhane Mehari, director;
Finland, “Concrete Night,” Pirjo Honkasalo, director;
France, “Saint Laurent,” Bertrand Bonello, director;
Georgia, “Corn Island,” George Ovashvili, director;
Germany, “Beloved Sisters,” Dominik Graf, director;
Greece, “Little England,” Pantelis Voulgaris, director;
Hong Kong, “The Golden Era,” Ann Hui, director;
Hungary, “White God,” Kornél Mundruczó, director;
Iceland, “Life in a Fishbowl,” Baldvin Zophoníasson, director;
India, “Liar’s Dice,” Geetu Mohandas, director;
Indonesia, “Soekarno,” Hanung Bramantyo, director;
Iran, “Today,” Reza Mirkarimi, director;
Iraq, “Mardan,” Batin Ghobadi, director;
Ireland, “The Gift,” Tom Collins, director;
Israel, “Gett, the Trial of Viviane Amsalem,” Ronit Elkabetz and Shlomi Elkabetz, directors;
Italy, “Human Capital,” Paolo Virzì, director;
Japan, “The Light Shines Only There,” Mipo O, director;
Kosovo, “Three Windows and a Hanging,” Isa Qosja, director;
Kyrgyzstan, “Kurmanjan Datka Queen of the Mountains,” Sadyk Sher-Niyaz, director;
Latvia, “Rocks in My Pockets,” Signe Baumane, director;
Lebanon, “Ghadi,” Amin Dora, director;
Lithuania, “The Gambler,” Ignas Jonynas, director;
Luxembourg, “Never Die Young,” Pol Cruchten, director;
Macedonia, “To the Hilt,” Stole Popov, director;
Malta, “Simshar,” Rebecca Cremona, director;
Mauritania, “Timbuktu,” Abderrahmane Sissako, director;
Mexico, “Cantinflas,” Sebastián del Amo, director;
Moldova, “The Unsaved,” Igor Cobileanski, director;
Montenegro, “The Kids from the Marx and Engels Street,” Nikola Vukčević, director;
Morocco, “The Red Moon,” Hassan Benjelloun, director;
Nepal, “Jhola,” Yadav Kumar Bhattarai, director;
Netherlands, “Accused,” Paula van der Oest, director;
New Zealand, “The Dead Lands,” Toa Fraser, director;
Norway, “1001 Grams,” Bent Hamer, director;
Pakistan, “Dukhtar,” Afia Nathaniel, director;
Palestine, “Eyes of a Thief,” Najwa Najjar, director;
Panama, “Invasion,” Abner Benaim, director;
Peru, “The Gospel of the Flesh,” Eduardo Mendoza, director;
Philippines, “Norte, the End of History,” Lav Diaz, director;
Poland, “Ida,” Paweł Pawlikowski, director;
Portugal, “What Now? Remind Me,” Joaquim Pinto, director;
Romania, “The Japanese Dog,” Tudor Cristian Jurgiu, director;
Russia, “Leviathan,” Andrey Zvyagintsev, director;
Serbia, “See You in Montevideo,” Dragan Bjelogrlić, director;
Singapore, “Sayang Disayang,” Sanif Olek, director;
Slovakia, “A Step into the Dark,” Miloslav Luther, director;
Slovenia, “Seduce Me,” Marko Šantić, director;
South Africa, “Elelwani,” Ntshavheni Wa Luruli, director;
South Korea, “Haemoo,” Shim Sung-bo, director;
Spain, “Living Is Easy with Eyes Closed,” David Trueba, director;
Sweden, “Force Majeure,” Ruben Östlund, director;
Switzerland, “The Circle,” Stefan Haupt, director;
Taiwan, “Ice Poison,” Midi Z, director;
Thailand, “The Teacher’s Diary,” Nithiwat Tharathorn, director;
Turkey, “Winter Sleep,” Nuri Bilge Ceylan, director;
Ukraine, “The Guide,” Oles Sanin, director;
United Kingdom, “Little Happiness,” Nihat Seven, director;
Uruguay, “Mr. Kaplan,” Álvaro Brechner, director;
Venezuela, “The Liberator,” Alberto Arvelo, director.

Richard Attenborough and Steven Spielberg: When 'E.T.' met 'Gandhi,' we got dinosaurs

To those who know their whole history, it may seem surprising that there was never any bad blood between Steven Spielberg and the late Richard Attenborough — unless you want to count the prehistoric kind drawn from those amber-encased mosquitos in Jurassic Park, the one big project they made together.

The two filmmakers, separated in age by more than a generation, were rivals who became collaborators and eventually friends. When Attenborough died at age 90 on Sunday, he left behind a legacy as an actor, director, and philanthropist — but the story of his relationship with Spielberg is evidence of another defining trait: gentleman.

Their complicated camaraderie began after the pair crossed paths at the most critical point in each of their careers — 1982, when Attenborough finally completed his 20-year quest to make the biographical drama Gandhi, and Spielberg finished a deeply personal film that stands as one of the best movies ever made about families: E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial.

Those two films couldn’t have been more different, but were destined for eternal comparison after becoming competitors at the 55th Academy Awards.

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Why the cast of 'Fury' got in fistfights every day on set

Most directors do their best to prevent actors punching each other. But during last year’s U.K. shoot for the World War II tank movie Fury, filmmaker David Ayer had his five principals—Brad Pitt, Logan Lerman, Shia Labeouf, Jon Bernthal, and Michael Peña—start the day by engaging in fisticuffs.

“We put them through martial arts training and physical combat classes,” says Ayer, whose film is released Oct. 17. “It’s a great ice breaker for actors. There’s something very honest about being punched in the face.”

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Eddie Redmayne on playing (and meeting) Stephen Hawking

Les Misérables star Eddie Redmayne plays Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything, a film that tracks the famed theoretical physicist’s relationship with his first wife, Jane (Felicity Jones), and the struggle they faced after he was diagnosed with the crippling degenerative illness ALS (also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease). “At age 21, he was a vibrant, funny young man, and he fell deeply in love with this woman,” Redmayne says. “Our film is about how they defied all the odds.”

To prepare for the film, which is released Nov. 7, the actor met with Hawking himself. “Even now, when he’s unable to move, you can still see such effervescence in his eyes,” he says.

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'Fury' director says audiences will be 'shocked' by Shia LaBeouf's performance

Shia LaBeouf has not had the best of times since shooting David Ayer’s World War II movie Fury in the U.K. last year. In December, artist Daniel Clowes claimed the actor’s short film HowardCantour.com plagiarized his 2007 comic Justin M. Damiano, and in June, police led LaBeouf away in handcuffs from a Broadway performance of Cabaret because of his allegedly disruptive behavior.

But Fury writer-director David Ayer has nothing but nice things to say about the Transformers star, who voluntarily sought treatment for alcohol addiction following the Cabaret incident “He’s amazing, a freakin’ gifted guy,” says Ayer. “He’s one of the best actors I’ve ever worked with. People are going to be shocked by how strong his performance is.” READ FULL STORY

Oscars set dates for 2015 award season

Mark your calendars, Oscar-watchers.

After a slightly later presentation this year due to the Winter Olympics, the 2015 Academy Awards telecast has returned to its usual domain on Sunday, Feb. 22 of next year.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences made the announcement today, along with a list of other significant dates that form the backbone of backslapping season.

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Oscar analysis: '12 Years a Slave' breaks Academy's trend of playing it safe

Shoulda trusted the coin.

About two weeks ago, sitting in the office of EW assistant managing editor Sean Smith, we were discussing EW’s official Oscar predictions and mulling the reaction I was getting from many voters: Gravity was taking the lead in the tightest Best Picture race in years, and those who favored 12 Years a Slave seemed soft in their support.

For months, ever since the historical drama premiered at the Toronto film festival, it was at the top of my predictions list — a crushing, emotionally resonant film that addressed how we perceive and treat those who appear to be different from ourselves. But it was also an uncompromising film, full of brutality that was often difficult to watch, and we all know the Academy Awards have compromised a lot in the past.

So I switched our pick toward Gravity, which was garnering a groundswell of support in other categories, and seemed to be the popular, more accessible favorite. The graphics people were alerted to make a last-minute adjustment, and I stayed with that through the final round of guessing. It was close enough to give me a stomachache. (Believe it or not, the predictions truly are made based on our best assessment of voters. There’s no advocacy or favoritism. The cold, hard pragmatism of wanting to be right guides those choices.)

The call was made: Gravity it would be, by a hair. But then I flipped a quarter, and Sean called it: Tails, it would be 12 Years a Slave.

Again — shoulda trusted the coin. READ FULL STORY

'Zombeavers': 'For your consideration' Oscar parody posters

ZOMBEAVERS

There’s more chance of a snowball surviving a two-week vacation in Hell than the movie Zombeavers ever scoring a best film Oscar nomination. But that hasn’t stopped the folks behind the forthcoming horror-comedy about — you got it! — zombified beavers releasing “For your consideration” Oscar parody posters which riff on Gravity, Her, and American Hustle.

You can check out both the posters and the Zombeavers trailer below. READ FULL STORY

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