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Tag: Awards Season (81-90 of 344)

'The Fifth Estate' trailer: Governments and banks tremble in true-life Wikileaks thriller

In an age when no one’s privacy is safe, even Big Brother has to worry about keeping his secrets.

The debut trailer for The Fifth Estate, a true-life thriller about the hemorrhage of government data in the Wikileaks age, depicts the early years of the clash between the most powerful nation on Earth and a group of well-connected hacker journalists.

Judging by the trailer, the movie seems to lean toward celebrating the rebel forces of Julian Assange (Benedict Cumberbatch) and his Wikileaks brethren, but director Bill Condon (Kinsey, Gods and Monsters, Dreamgirls) tells EW that’s not his intent.

“The movie presents him neither as hero or villain. We just try to present who he is and let you make up your mind,” Condon says. “I think, in fact, he’s neither.”

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'Blue is the Warmest Color' wins Palme d'Or at Cannes Film Festival

Blue is the Warmest Color won the top prize at the 66th annual Cannes Film Festival on Sunday. The French film, directed by Abdellatif Kechiche, is a sexually explicit lesbian love story (read Owen Gleiberman’s review here). Meanwhile, Ethan and Joel Coen won the Grand Prix for their folk music flick Inside Llewyn Davis. The Artist star Berenice Bejo won Best Actress for her role in The Past, and screen icon Bruce Dern picked up Best Actor for his starring role in Alexander Payne’s Nebraska. This year’s Cannes jury was headed by director Steven Spielberg.

Read more:
Cannes 2013: ‘Blue Is the Warmest Color’ is a seriously sexy French lesbian coming-of-age love story. Plus, Marion Cotillard and Joaquin Phoenix in ‘The Immigrant’
Cannes 2013: Alexander Payne’s ‘Nebraska’ is very minor Payne (but still a pleasure). Plus, my Palme d’Or prediction
Cannes 2013: With hardly a line of dialogue, Robert Redford is marvelous as a man lost at sea. Plus, Liz Taylor’s bling

Golden Trailer Awards: Six things we learned

Last night, trailer editors gathered at the Art Deco-inspired Saban Theater in L.A. to learn who would receive the highest honor in their field — the Golden Trailer. Attendees in Hawaiian shirts, sequined dresses, suits and ties, and high-heeled boots settled in around the auditorium for two hours of supercuts.

Co-hosts Rob Schneider and Aisha Tyler took turns making fun of the movies the trailers were selling, including resurrecting some punching bags from the most recent awards season, like Les Miserables. Between such outdated jokes, the audience was treated to “nano trailers” — cuts of cuts from the nominated films.

If you look forward to going to the movies at least in part because you get to watch 20 minutes of trailers, the Golden Trailer awards is for you. Here are six things we learned about this thankless, often overlooked industry and its greats last night:

Awards season never really ends

It just gets more fun! The tone at the Golden Trailers was very low-key, with lots of joking around. The nominees and winners didn’t take the event too seriously, but there were still some nice moments when winners thanked their colleagues for challenging them to be more creative and push the boundaries of their field. READ FULL STORY

'Science Fiction Land': Will 'Argo's' Oscar help doc about real movie behind fake movie?

Argo’s Oscar triumph will certainly enhance the careers of all those involved, none more so than its producer, director, and star, Ben Affleck. But it could also boost another filmmaker who has absolutely nothing to do with Argo, except a desire to bring to screen a part of the story that the acclaimed historical drama left out.

EW.com first told you about Science Fiction Land last fall, when its director, Judd Ehrlich, was seeking Kickstarter support to raise $50,000 to finish the project. (Mission: Accomplished.) To briefly recap here: Argo was based on the true-life tale of CIA agent Tony Mendez (played by Affleck in the movie), who posed as the producer of a fake science fiction flick to rescue six Americans trapped in Iran in 1979. Science Fiction Land is a documentary that will profile an idealistic dreamer-schemer named Barry Ira Geller, whose bid to make a Star Wars-esque sci-fi opus based on Roger Zelazny’s 1967 sci-fi novel Lord of Light (and build a $400 million, 1000-acre theme park called Science Fiction Land) proved to be a wild and weird adventure that ended in scandalous failure in 1980. What Geller didn’t learn until just a few years ago was that the Oscar-winning make-up artist who had been working on Lord of Light, John Chambers (played in Argo by John Goodman), was also a CIA consultant who helped Mendez plan the rescue operation, and that they used Geller’s script and concept art, drawn by comic book legend Jack Kirby, as props in their ruse.
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Oscar winners: Analysis of who won, why, and where EW went wrong and right

prize_fighter1_bannerThere weren’t many upsets at the 2013 Oscars — more like a lot of sure-things, and a few very close races that could have gone one of three (or sometimes four) different ways.

As expected, Argo claimed the Best Picture award, riding an unstoppable wave of support after Ben Affleck was denied a directing nomination. Did voters cast their ballots last night, and throughout all the pre-Oscar guild awards, because they felt bad for the actor/filmmaker? That’s absurd. The Academy Awards may make pitiful choices sometimes, but they are not a pity party. READ FULL STORY

Oscars 2013: The best acceptance speeches, starring Anne Hathaway, Ben Affleck & more -- VIDEO

From Christoph Waltz’s surprise Best Supporting Actor win to Ben Affleck’s emotional, heartfelt remarks after Argo snagged Best Picture, last night’s Academy Awards were filled with memorable acceptance speeches — and notable pre-speech journeys to the stage. (How’s your knee, Jennifer Lawrence?)

Relive the night’s best post-win soliloquies below. Think any will eventually reach “You like me! Right now, you like me!” status? READ FULL STORY

Oscars 2013: The full winners list

Just as viewers seemed divided over Seth MacFarlane’s hosting of this year’s Oscars, so Academy voters were split over the films themselves. Django Unchained, Les Miserables, Amour, Lincoln, and Silver Linings Playbook all scored major awards, with Jennifer Lawrence and Daniel Day-Lewis winning the top acting Oscars. But Life of Pi director Ang Lee took home the Best Director prize while Argo won Best Picture. You can check out the full list of winners below.

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'Beasts of the Southern Wild' breakout Quvenzhane Wallis to star in new big-screen 'Annie'

Nine-year-old Beasts of the Southern Wild breakout Quvenzhané Wallis may be a long shot to win the Best Actress award at this year’s Oscars, but no matter what happens tonight, you can bet your bottom dollar that the sun will come out tomorrow for the young actress — especially now that she has officially signed on to star in Sony Pictures’ new big-screen adaptation of the Broadway musical Annie. The fresh take on the beloved tale of the plucky orphan was originally developed by Will Smith’s Overbrook Entertainment production company and rapper Jay-Z’s Marcy Media as a starring vehicle for Smith’s daughter, Willow. But with the 12-year-old Willow having aged out of the role, Wallis—who EW learned earlier this month was in talks for the project—will now step in. Will Gluck (Easy A) is on board to direct the film.

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'Silver Linings Playbook' wins big at Independent Spirit Awards

The weekend’s other big movie awards ceremony—the Independent Spirit Awards—was held this afternoon in Santa Monica, Calif., with Andy Samberg on board as host. The big winner was David O. Russell’s romantic dramedy Silver Linings Playbook, which took home four prizes: best feature, best director, best actress, and best screenplay. But there was plenty of love spread around the year’s top indies. Here’s the full list of winners: READ FULL STORY

Oscars: 'Les Miserables' cast performing for first time together onstage

les-mis-jackman-hathaway-02

prize_fighter1_bannerFrom stage to screen — and now back again.

Les Miserables fans who’ve longed for the stars of the Oscar-nominated film to join forces in a live performance will see their wish come true this Sunday at the Academy Awards.

At rehearsals for the show Friday, Hugh Jackman, Anne Hathaway, Russell Crowe, Amanda Seyfried, Eddie Redmayne, Samantha Barks, Aaron Tveit, Sacha Baron Cohen, and Helena Bonham Carter took part in a massive production number made up of a medley from the film, including the Oscar-nominated original song “Suddenly.”

They weren’t alone. It was a Les Mis reunion in more ways than just the movie …

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