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Tag: Bachelorette (1-4 of 4)

Box office report: 'The Possession' leads the worst weekend in over a decade

Chances are, you weren’t at the movies this weekend. Not a single film at the box office reached $10 million. Call it the curse of The Oogieloves.

The Top 12 films grossed a depressingly low $51.9 million — the worst Top 12 total since Sept. 5-7, 2008, when Nicolas Cage flop Bangkok Dangerous led the chart with $7.7 million and the Top 12 films earned $50.3 million.

Even more distressingly, this weekend marked the lowest cumulative ticket sales in over a decade. The last frame to notch worse overall ticket sales was Sept. 21-23, 2001 — two weekends after the 9/11 attacks — when only one new wide release entered theaters: Mariah Carey’s infamous bomb Glitter. (Keep in mind, as final weekend results come in on Monday, things could change. Stay tuned.)

Lionsgate’s $14 million horror entry The Possession once again topped the chart with $9.5 million. The film, which earned a “B” CinemaScore grade last week, enjoyed a better than expected hold (it dropped 46 percent) — especially since its debut results were inflated by it bowing on a holiday weekend. After ten days, The Possession has earned $33.3 million, and by the end of its run, it may possess close to $50 million total. READ FULL STORY

'Bachelorette' and the video-on-demand revolution: How digital distribution is changing indie cinema

When Bachelorette arrived at the Sundance Film Festival last January, the film’s producers were quite clear-eyed about its prospects. The dark comedy — about three hard-partying high school friends (Kirsten Dunst, Isla Fisher, and Lizzy Caplan) and their evening of escalating debauchery before the wedding of another friend (Rebel Wilson) — was based on a years-old play by writer-director Leslye Headland. But just as the feature film adaptation was set to go before cameras last summer, Bridesmaids, which shares some pointed similarities, became a massive, zeitgeist-seizing sensation.

“When Bridesmaids hit, I knew, ‘Oh, now [Bachelorette] is going to look like a knock off,’” says producer Adam McKay, who with fellow producers Will Ferrell and Jessica Elbaum helped champion the film through their production company, Gary Sanchez Productions. So McKay turned his sights beyond U.S. theaters, to the European release (“I thought they’d enjoy the darkness of the movie”), home video, and cable. One thought that did not cross his mind? Video on demand. “No, no,” he says. “I wasn’t thinking VOD at all.”

Even after Bachelorette was snapped up by RADiUS, The Weinstein Company’s brand new label focused on alternative distribution, McKay remained skeptical at the plan to release the film on VOD a full month before its theatrical debut Sept. 7. “It just didn’t seem like that big of a deal to me,” he says with a chuckle. So you can imagine McKay’s surprise when, within 48 hours of its digital premiere, Bachelorette hit number one on the iTunes video-on-demand chart — the first time, it seems, that a film has hit that milestone before hitting movie theaters.

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Kirsten Dunst dark comedy 'Bachelorette' hits No. 1 on iTunes -- before its theatrical release

The burgeoning world of on-demand/digital releases for feature films hit a big milestone this week. The dark romantic comedy Bachelorette – about three best friends (Kirsten Dunst, Isla Fisher, and Lizzy Caplan) on an epic pre-wedding bender – hit No. 1 on the iTunes Movies chart. It’s the first time a film has hit that benchmark before its theatrical release. Bachelorette, which premiered at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival, opens in select theaters on Sept. 7.

The accomplishment is especially sweet for the film’s distributor, RADiUS, which was created by The Weinstein Company earlier this year specifically to release films in non-traditional formats. Bachelorette was the company’s first acquisition.

Read more:
‘Bachelorette’ trailer: Watch Kirsten Dunst, Adam Scott and James Marsden enjoy some NSFW thrills
Sundance 2012: The 12 biggest stories of the indie film fest
Sundance: ‘Bachelorette’ is a new kind of chick flick, caustically clever yet without a romantic bone in its body

Sundance: 'Bachelorette' is a new kind of chick flick, caustically clever yet without a romantic bone in its body

It reduces the hilarious humanity of Bridesmaids to sum it up, simply, as the comedy that proved that girls in a movie could be just as gross and raunchy as guys. Yet there’s no denying that it did prove that. The movie, for all time, busted down that door. Bachelorette, a long-sloshed-night-before-the-wedding comedy that’s as caustic and brittle and high-strung as its damaged-princess heroines, zooms through the door that Bridesmaids kicked open without ever looking back — and, while it’s at it, it busts open half a dozen new ones. In Bachelorette, girls behaving badly isn’t just a joke, it’s a way of life.

In the opening scene, set in Los Angeles, Becky, who is sweet and plus-size and deeply self-conscious about it (she’s played by Rebel Wilson, Kristen Wiig’s cockney freak of a roommate in Bridesmaids), informs her best friend, the lovely platinum-blonde ice queen Regan (Kirsten Dunst), that she’s engaged, an announcement that Regan greets by just about choking on her lunch with jealousy. That’s what a petty, lacquered bitch she is. Most of Bachelorette takes place six months later, in Manhattan, on the eve of Becky’s nuptials, which is of course the perfect occasion for a drug-drenched bachelorette party that spins wildly out of control. But this isn’t a daffy clockwork farce like the Hangover films; it’s more like a relentless, revved-up pageant of naked feminine dysfunction. The setting may be New York, but at heart Bachelorette is a very L.A. movie, one in which vanity has become toxic. It’s a comedy of values about young women who don’t have any. READ FULL STORY

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