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Tag: Benedict Cumberbatch (1-10 of 45)

Benedict Cumberbatch joins Warner Bros.' 'Jungle Book: Origins'

Say goodbye to Sherlock and hello to Shere Khan: Benedict Cumberbatch will voice the tiger in Warner Bros.’ upcoming Jungle Book: Origins, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Cumberbatch is the first voice lead to join the film, which is being directed by Andy Serkis. Disney is also working on a Jungle Book film, titled The Jungle Book and directed by Jon Favreau. That film is set to arrive in theaters Oct. 9, 2015, while Jungle Book: Origins won’t be released until Oct. 21, 2016.

Warner Bros. didn’t immediately return EW‘s request for comment.

Video: Benedict Cumberbatch races against time in 'The Imitation Game' trailer

British mathematician Alan Turing had the tough job during World War II of deciphering Nazi codes, a task that ultimately helped lead to the Allied victory. But Turing’s life wasn’t smooth sailing even after his huge success: He was later prosecuted for being gay, then considered a crime.

Benedict Cumberbatch plays Turing in the upcoming The Imitation Gamewhich documents Turing’s race against time during the war and his life before and after. Directed by Morten Tyldum, the film also features Keira Knightley, Matthew Goode, and Mark Strong.

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Benedict Cumberbatch outwits Nazis in 'The Imitation Game' -- FIRST LOOK

Jack English

Whether it’s Sherlock Holmes or Star Trek‘s Khan, Benedict Cumberbatch is known for portraying complex, nuanced characters. Still, the actor felt a particular responsibility to dig deep when it came time to play brilliant cryptographer Alan Turing—the British mathematician who deciphered Nazi codes during WWII and was later prosecuted for being gay—in The Imitation Game.

“He’s an exceptional man,” says Cumberbatch, who prepped for the role by perfecting Turing’s stuttering cadences and studying his correspondence with the mother of his high school crush. “I hope this film does justice to this unsung hero.”

The movie hits theaters Nov. 21 (or Nov. 14, if you fly to the U.K. to see it), but we procured a couple stills to hold you over.

Casting Net: Benedict Cumberbatch replaces Guy Pearce in 'Black Mass'

• Benedict Cumberbatch (The Imitation Game) will replace Guy Pearce (The Rover) in the upcoming Whitey Bulger biopic starring Johnny Depp (Transcendence). According to Cross Creek Pictures president Brian Oliver, Pearce dropped out of the upcoming crime drama, which has already started filming in Boston, due to scheduling conflicts. Cumberbatch will take over the role of Billy Bulger, Whitey’s (Depp) law-abiding brother, in the upcoming film, which tells the true story of the FBI’s unconventional alliance with the Irish Mob. [Variety] READ FULL STORY

Benedict Cumberbatch to star in Iraq drama 'The Yellow Birds'

Benedict Cumberbatch has signed on to The Yellow Birds, a film adaptation of Kevin Powers’ 2012 National Book Award finalist about the Iraq War.

The Sherlock star will star as a sergeant who takes two young soldiers — played by Will Poulter and Tye Sheridan — under his wing. The story focuses on 21-year-old Private Bartle and the teenaged Private Murphy, who meet at boot camp and are deployed to Iraq. Some of the story is autobiographical; Powers served as an Army machine gunner in Iraq after enlisting at the age of 17. READ FULL STORY

Casting Net: Benedict Cumberbatch joins military thriller; Plus, Kristen Stewart boards 'Still Alice,' more

• Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) is attached to star in Blood Mountain, a thriller from director Sergei Bodrov about a military contractor whose team is ambushed, leaving him solely responsible for bringing a terrorist to safe grounds. The Morocco shoot is supposed to begin in April. Cumberbatch’s Alan Turning biopic The Imitation Game is currently in post production, and he’s also attached to star in the adaptation of The Lost City of Z. [Variety]

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Dueling Everest movies: Jake Gyllenhaal film begins shooting; Sony's 'The Summit' still in base camp

When it comes to ascending a summit, first to the top usually wins. News this week confirmed that Working Title’s Everest, to be released by Universal, is a go. The film, from director Baltasar Kormákur (2 Guns) began production Monday in Italy, with Jake Gyllenhaal, Josh Brolin, Jason Clarke and John Hawkes playing four of the climbers who attempted the disastrous 1996 ascent of Mount Everest in the Himalayas, only to be thwarted with terrible conditions that led to the loss of many lives.

Now that this film is in production, will it kill a competing Everest film at Sony?

Sony declined to comment on its project, which takes place in the 1920s and chronicles British climber George Mallory’s attempts to scale the world’s tallest mountain. One source close to the production says the studio is still committed to the movie, but the film, which Doug Liman (Mr. and Mrs. Smith) is set to direct after finishing the upcoming Tom Cruise-starrer Edge of Tomorrow, will no longer begin production in the next couple of months as originally planned.

Rather, the start date on the film — which now carries the title The Summit and still has Tom Hardy (Inception) attached to play Mallory and Luke Evans (Fast & Furious 6) to play his Australian rival George Finch — has been pushed to either early summer  or perhaps even to 2015.

According to another source, the studio’s hesitation on the project centers on concern over how to sell the the film domestically. Overseas, the film’s prospects appear much healthier considering the storyline and international cast but in the U.S. audiences are often reluctant to give period films a chance.

Complicating matters, a schedule change may force star Hardy to drop out. As reported earlier, Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) is still interested in the lead role should Hardy need to leave.

Sony is also being more cost conscious after a rough 2013 and launching a $60 million movie with a competing film in the pipeline may not look too appealing. Last summer the studio was on the wrong end of dueling White House disaster movies. Their White House Down with Channing Tatum and Jamie Foxx opened at the end of June, earning $73 million. It had followed Film District’s Olympus Has Fallen, which opened in March and grossed $98 million.

Still, sources close to the project says the film, which was scripted by Sheldon Turner (Up in the Air), is still important to the studio.

The trick now is to keep that enthusiasm from falling off the mountain.

Critical Mass: Is 'The Desolation of Smaug' better than 'An Unexpected Journey'?

For four epic Middle-earth adventures, director Peter Jackson has brought to life the famous hobbits, dwarfs, elves, orcs, and wizards from J.R.R. Tolkien’s imagination. But in The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug, part 2 of Jackson’s three-part quest to wring ever last ounce of drama from Tolkien’s slim Lord of the Ring‘s predecessor, the visual feast starts and ends with a giant dragon who sounds an awful lot like Sherlock Holmes.

Smaug is the apocalypse-breathing dragon who evicted the dwarfs from their mountain home and now swims in their treasure. Jackson has compared Smaug to Hannibal Lecter, and the allure of his inevitable confrontation with Bilbo (Martin Freeman) promises to be as anticipated and delighted in as the hobbit’s first encounter with Gollum in the previous movie, An Unexpected Journey. “The dragon is, quite simply, a marvel,” writes EW’s Owen Gleiberman, “gargantuan yet balletic, hoarding his mountain of gold with a razor-toothed smile, breathing not just flame but an inferno, and voiced by Benedict Cumberbatch with the most delicious, insidious knowledge.”

Joining Bilbo in the second leg of his adventure, along with Gandalf (Ian McKellen) and the baker’s dozen of dwarfs, is a familiar face from the Rings trilogy: Orlando Bloom’s Legolas, who wasn’t originally written in The Hobbit. Jackson and his co-writers, Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens, go even further outside the Tolkien canon with Tauriel (Evangeline Lilly), a wholly-invented female-warrior elf who introduces a romantic thread not entirely unwelcome in the film, according to many critics.

Before you head to the theater — wearing your fuzzy hobbit slippers, of course — click below to see what the leading critics are saying about The Desolation of Smaug. READ FULL STORY

Bill Condon on 'Fifth Estate' disaster: Assange just 'wore out his welcome'

Not even the Cumberbitches could save it. By all accounts, The Fifth Estate — Bill Condon’s movie about WikiLeaks mastermind Julian Assange, starring Benedict Cumberbatch — was a box office disaster. After a lukewarm reception at Toronto and opening to mixed reviews last month, the film has only made a little over $3 million since its Oct. 18 release. Director Condon told EW he blames the lackluster response on Assange.

“We were all so excited [around the release date] because it was just in the news recently, but the opposite might be true, that it simply wore out its welcome and that there is something about Assange. I do think there’s something about him that does not suggest an evening’s entertainment,” Condon said.

Assange has reportedly called the unauthorized biopic “a massive propaganda attack,” and even urged Cumberbatch to quit the film.
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Benedict Cumberbatch and 'The Fifth Estate' debacle

The Toronto Film Festival is the springboard for movies with Oscar aspirations. The last six Best Picture winners played in Toronto, so when the festival named The Fifth Estate its opening-night premiere, people assumed that Bill Condon’s WikiLeaks movie starring Benedict Cumberbatch as the frosty Julian Assange was a bona fide Oscar contender. Condon has an Oscar pedigree (Gods and Monsters), Assange is a mysterious, polarizing figure who remains in the headlines, and Cumberbatch is an on-the-verge actor with a passionate fanbase. The Fifth Estate had all the makings of another Toronto success story, like Argo or Silver Linings Playbook.

But The Fifth Estate stumbled out of the gate with a lukewarm reception in Toronto, and that verdict was nothing compared to the giant collective yawn that awaited the film upon its opening weekend. Critics were unkind, but nowhere near as callous as the paying public. Playing in more than 1,700 theaters, DreamWorks’ cyber-thriller earned just $1.7 million, making it one of the limpest opening weekends of any wide release this year. Paranoia, the Harrison Ford/Gary Oldman corporate espionage stinker, performed better. As did Movie 43, the star-studded comedy anthology designed to make The Kentucky Fried Movie look like Casablanca. Not the neighborhood any movie wants to find itself, much less one with such high hopes.

“We’re certainly disappointed by the results,” Dave Hollis, Disney’s distribution chief, told Variety, “and we’re still trying to figure out the ‘whys.’”
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