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Tag: Book Adaptations (11-20 of 219)

'If I Stay' prologue featurette: 'Everyone is waiting on me' -- VIDEO

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“How am I supposed to decide this?” That’s the question that torments young Mia (Chloe Grace Moretz) through the entirety of If I Stay, the upcoming big-screen adaptation of Gayle Forman’s YA hit.

If I Stay follows Mia, a 17-year-old cellist who finds herself in a coma after a car accident that killed the rest of her family. The story then takes the audience through Mia’s memories and experiences as she tries to make the decision to either wake up or to die.

In a new preview video for the film, we get an in-depth look at Mia’s decision and some of the key memories that help her make it. Let’s just say that if the book made you cry, you might want to have a tissue nearby for this sneak-peek as well. After all, Moretz did tell EW that her goal with this film was to make the audience feel. “You want to watch something that actually means something and makes you feel and makes you want to be involved,” Moretz said. “That’s what I wanted to make and that’s what I strive to make.”

Watch the prologue featurette below: READ FULL STORY

'The Giver' character posters: The eyes have it

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All right, I’ll admit it: I spoke too soon.

You may recall the outcry that erupted when the first trailer for The Giver, a long-gestating film adaptation of Lois Lowry’s seminal middle-grade dystopian novel, hit the internet in March. The main gripe from fans: The entire trailer was in bright, lurid color, even though The Giver takes place in a world ruled by “sameness” — there’s no real free will, no real individuality, and, most importantly, no color besides shades of gray, at least until the story’s protagonist begins to learn more about the world as it used to be.

A featurette released a few weeks later, however, revealed that at least some parts of the film were shot in black and white — and a new set of character posters appear mostly without color, minus a small strip that runs through the center of each image. The message: “We hear you, Giver fans.” Think this means they might reconsider that random spaceship too?

Check below for the full set of posters, featuring eight of the film’s major characters — including those played by Meryl Streep, Jeff Bridges, and, yes, Taylor Swift. READ FULL STORY

'Pretty Little Liars' showrunner Marlene King to adapt 'The Merciless'

Marlene King’s got a secret. Can you keep it?

The Pretty Little Liars showrunner is on board to adapt Danielle Vega’s upcoming horror novel, The Merciless, for the big screen. The novel, which was inspired by real events, follows a new student in town as she gets to know the popular clique in high school. Not unlike Pretty Little Liars, the popular clique turns out to have a darker side. But this time, the new girl participates in a dangerous exorcism of another classmate. So perhaps the Liars should be thankful their biggest worry is a cyber bully.

The Merciless is set to hit shelves on June 12, 2014 with Lionsgate having acquired the feature film rights.

Check out Marlene King’s tweet about the exciting news below:

'Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day' trailer: That title really says it all

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Judith Viorst’s classic picture book Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day tells the tale of a five-year-old ginger who endures 24 hours of nonstop catastrophe. He goes to sleep with gum in his mouth and wakes up with gum in his hair; he fails to snag an awesome cereal box prize; at school, he’s chastised for forgetting about the number 16. (These things all count as disasters when you’re five.)

Disney’s upcoming film adaptation of the book retains Alexander and the book’s bad-day premise — but it also ages up Viorst’s protagonist, shifts the story’s focus to the kid’s entire nuclear family (including parents Steve Carell and Jennifer Garner), and, as all contemporary adaptations of beloved books must, adds a few unfortunate modern touches. Always wanted to hear Alexander lisp, “I can’t believe Elliot texted photoshopped pictures of me to the whole school”? Wish granted, whoever you are. Watch the trailer below:

READ FULL STORY

Wally Lamb's 'Wishin' and Hopin' is headed to the big screen

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For the first time ever, Wally Lamb is getting the big screen treatment! Lamb’s bestseller Wishin’ and Hopin’ is being made into a feature film set to shoot in Connecticut this summer.

With a screenplay written by John Doolan, Wishin’ and Hopin’ is a Christmas story set in the 1960s in the fictional town of Three Rivers, Connecticut, and more specifically, St. Aloysius Gonzaga Parochial School. The book follows a young boy, Felix, as he attends Catholic school and learns about life and culture from a Russian student and a substitute teacher, among others.

The film will be directed by Colin Theys. Lamb is on board as an executive producer.

Chloe Grace Moretz brings Mia to life in 'If I Stay' -- EXCLUSIVE FIRST LOOK

Translating a beloved book onto the big screen is a daunting proposition. But in the case of Gayle Forman’s teen sensation If I Stay, 17-year-old Chloë Grace Moretz isn’t nervous.

“Being a fan of the book myself, I kind of understood what I wanted to see from the character. And in listening to Gayle, who originated the character, I knew what she wanted to see,” Moretz told EW. “We all tried to stay incredibly faithful to the story. That’s why we’re making it.”

READ FULL STORY

'The Giver' trailer: Meryl Streep! Jeff Bridges! Color?! VIDEO

So this is how you finally make a movie of The Giver after more than 15 years of development hell: By aging up the characters, adding in awesome body-snatching spaceships, and setting the whole thing to a pounding score straight out of the Dystopian YA Handbook.

Lois Lowry’s classic story — one of the first modern dystopic tales written explicitly for a younger audience — takes place in a future where all of the unpleasant, messy aspects of life (war, pain, difference, feelings in general) have been wiped away. (In the book, even the concept of color has been erased… but perhaps because they feared scaring off today’s teens with black-and-white scenes, The Giver‘s team seems to have elected to ignore that part.)

Its main character is Jonas (newly turned 12 in the book, but here played by strapping 24-year-old Aussie Brenton Thwaites), a boy who is chosen to become the community’s new Receiver of Memory — the only person who can recall what life was like before Sameness descended. But as Jonas begins his training under the outgoing Receiver — a.k.a. The Giver (Jeff Bridges, who also produced the film) — he realizes everything his people lost when they elected to soften the world’s hard edges… and decides to take drastic action to change things for good.

READ FULL STORY

'Catfish' directors to adapt Jeanne Ryan's 'Nerve'

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Directing duo Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman — the team behind the documentary film Catfish — have a lot of nerve. (Get it?)

EW has confirmed that the duo will direct an upcoming adaptation of Nerve, Jeanne Ryan’s hit YA novel, for Lionsgate. The novel follows a high school senior who decides to branch out by participating in an online game of truth or dare. The catch? The game is constantly being watched and commented on. Not surprisingly, she realizes it might not have been the best decision when she starts to advance to higher levels and suddenly finds herself in life-threatening situations.

American Horror Story‘s executive producer Jessica Sharzer wrote the adaptation.

'Two Faces of January' trailer: 'Talented Mr. Ripley' meets 'Drive' -- VIDEO

The trailer for The Two Faces of January, a new film starring Viggo Mortensen and Kirsten Dunst, has been released in anticipation of its premiere at the Berlin Film Festival this week. The movie is an adaptation of a novel by Patricia Highsmith, who also wrote The Talented Mr. Ripley. If you were a fan of that ominous tale of envy, obsession, and murder, then this story promises a similar smorgasbord. If you read “Viggo Mortensen and Kirsten Dunst” and just skipped to the trailer, then great. I would’ve done the same.

January revolves around a tense love triangle — or what looks like more of a longing triangle — between a married couple and their tour guide in 1960s Greece. Mortensen is the tan and husky-voiced husband, while Dunst stars as the glittering blond wife. Fresh off his success in Inside Llewyn Davis, Oscar Isaac plays the devilishly handsome tour guide who gets swept into the couple’s marital troubles, namely fraud and murder. Hossein Amini, the screenwriter behind Drive and Snow White & the Huntsmen, will try his hand at directing for the first time. (I hope this project leans toward Amini’s work on Drive and not toward The Four Feathers. RIP Heath Ledger; you were great in everything.) But really how bad could January be with those three actors starring? I’m sold already.
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'The Room' star Greg Sestero says James Franco 'ideal guy' to adapt memoir

Can the making of a bad film make for a good one? That is the question raised by the news — reported by Deadline — that James Franco is to direct an adaptation of The Disaster Artist, actor Greg Sestero’s memoir about his time spent starring in the so-bad-it’s-awesome cult movie The Room.

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