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Meet the nice guy who plays 'Boyhood's terrifying stepdad

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A character actor with more than 80 film and TV projects to his name, Austin, Tex.-based Marco Perella is receiving his widest exposure ever—for a movie he finished shooting eight years ago. As the drunk disciplinarian stepfather of Mason (Ellar Coltrane) in Richard Linklater’s decades-spanning Boyhood, Perella plays the pathetic bully with a finesse that’s left some viewers thinking the movie was all too real.

EW spoke to Perella about his role in the film and the choice of words when he’s being praised for being bad.

The interview below references specific scenes and plot details of Boyhood. READ FULL STORY

Report: Richard Linklater cuts bait on 'Incredible Mr. Limpet'

Richard Linklater might be an auteur, but he’s not a snob: One year after releasing Before Sunset in 2004, for example, he directed a remake of the Bad News Bears. Still, there is a certain degree of artistic whiplash in going from Boyhood, his current critical hit that he spent 12 years making, to a remake of The Incredible Mr. Limpet, a Warner Bros. project he’s been attached to for more than three years. The original Limpet was an animation/live-action hybrid that starred Don Knotts as a man who turns into a fish and helps the Navy destroy Nazi submarines.

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'Bending the Light' director Michael Apted on the future of the camera

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Veteran director Michael Apted investigates the art of the lens in his new documentary Bending the Light, which takes audiences inside a lens-making factory to explore the relationship between artists and their tools. Apted spoke to EW about the film (set to premiere at the Traverse City Film Festival on Aug. 3), the challenges of being afforded a “rare glimpse” inside an otherwise secure factory, the cultural influences of his Up series, and whether or not he thinks it might have inspired Richard Linklater’s Boyhood.

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Patricia Arquette channeled the personal in 'Boyhood'

Movie moms often get the short shrift in terms of character development: When seen over a number of years, they’re either the immutable rock of the family or a one-dimensional obstacle. But in Boyhood, which director Richard Linklater filmed with the same actors over 12 years, Patricia Arquette’s Olivia is as in-flux, flawed, and complex as the kids who are growing up before the audience’s eyes.

EW got a chance to speak to the actress about her experiences and surprisingly personal inspirations for Olivia.

The interview below references specific scenes in Boyhood.

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'Boyhood' exclusive: Richard Linklater explains his cinematic experiment -- VIDEO

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Richard Linklater knew he wanted to make a film about childhood. It’s not a revolutionary idea, by any means, but Linklater decided to make it so. Instead of forcing the passage of time with makeup and lighting and different actors, he resolved to film the same cast over the course of a number of years, allowing everyone to actually change and age and grow.

The result is Boyhood, a 12-year glimpse into the lives of a Texas family, starring Ethan Hawke, Patricia Arquette, and Ellar Coltrane. As Owen Gleiberman wrote after Boyhood‘s Sundance premiere: “It touches something deep and true, which is that we grow up to be the people we are by letting every moment form us.”

Watch as Linklater, Hawke, and Arquette discuss the film in a moving featurette after the jump. READ FULL STORY

'Boyhood' trailer: See Richard Linklater's little movie that took 12 years to make

There have been some great movies that capture the idea of childhood in a particular moment in a boy’s life. For example, Stand By Me. But Richard Linklater didn’t want to limit himself to one moment, or one age, or even one decade, as it turns out. For Boyhood, he cast a child (Ellar Coltrane) as his protagonist, Mason, and then built a story around him that he continued for 12 years, until the boy went off to college. It’s not a documentary, like the 7-Up series, but a complete, well-crafted character study. Not only do Coltrane and Linklater’s daughter, Lorelei, who plays Mason’s sister, grow up literally before your eyes, but the parents — Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette — also age and grow and learn.

The cut of the film that screened at Sundance was bursting with nostalgic popular music — songs that may or may not be licensed as part of the finished film — but the trailer makes great use of “Hero” by Family of the Year. It’s the perfect tune to tell this story. Watch the trailer below: READ FULL STORY

Richard Linklater's 'Boyhood' gets summer release date

Richard Linklater’s Boyhood, a movie 12 years in the making, will open in theaters on July 11.

Back in 2002, Linklater had the idea to make a movie about childhood — but rather than telling a story about a singular moment or chapter from growing up, he decided to cast a 6-year-old (Ellar Coltrane) and film him a little bit every year until he went to college. Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette play the boy’s parents, and Linklater’s daughter, Lorelei, plays the boy’s sister.

IFC Films agreed to produce and distribute the film at the outset, and their faith was rewarded when Linklater’s daring, unconventional film wowed audiences at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival. The film went to receive more accolades at the Berlin Film Festival and SXSW.

Sundance 2014: With tons of movies sold, the lack of a mega deal was no big deal

I can testify that when you go to a film festival, and someone inquires about how the movies were that year, the answer you end up giving — “Really terrific!” “Lousy!” “They were okay!” — is often dictated by exactly one movie. If you saw something that totally knocked you out, the sort of film that you think is going to get major play in the real world, and you’re already dusting off a place on your 10 Best list for it, then that one movie can determine your entire perception of the festival. That’s what happened to me last year at Sundance when I saw Fruitvale (they hadn’t added the Station yet). The fact that you’ve witnessed a certified home run makes the festival feel to you, in hindsight, like…well, a baseball game in which your team hit a home run. It’s more than a good movie; it’s why you came — to see an unheralded filmmaker knock one out of the park. A single movie that rocks your world can define, year in and year out, the Sundance experience — the reason that a festival like this one exists. Some of the films I’ve seen at Sundance that have had that effect include Crumb (1995), Welcome to the Dollhouse (1995), I Shot Andy Warhol (1996), Buffalo 66 (1998), The Blair Witch Project (1999), Chuck & Buck (2000), Wet Hot American Summer (2001), American Splendor (2003), Capturing the Friedmans (2003), Thirteen (2003), Hustle & Flow (2005), Precious (2009), and Fruitvale (2013). READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Richard Linklater discusses 12-year process of making 'Boyhood' -- VIDEO

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Director Richard Linklater put an astonishing twist on the classic coming-of-age story when he decided to shoot his latest film, Boyhood, over the course of 12 years. The film follows the life of 7-year-old Mason (Ellar Coltrane) as he grows and makes his way through his formative years from elementary school to high school.

EW’s Sara Vilkomerson sat down with Linklater and Boyhood stars Ethan Hawke (Getaway), Patricia Arquette (Boardwalk Empire), and Ellar Coltrane (Lone Star State of Mind) to discuss the process of making a film whose principle production started 4208 days ago:
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Sundance 2014: Richard Linklater's entrancing 'Boyhood' captures the Zen of growing up

Richard Linklater’s Boyhood, which premiered at Sundance last night, is an entrancing, one-of-a-kind act of dramatic storytelling: a beautiful stunt of a movie. It was shot over a period of 12 years, beginning in 2002, and it takes two hours and 40 minutes to tell the story of a boy named Mason as he grows up in Texas. The hook of the movie — and if it is a stunt, it’s a visionary one — is that Mason is played throughout by a young actor named Ellar Coltrane, who we literally watch grow up, year after year, on camera. That makes the film a kind of cousin to Michael Apted’s series of Up documentaries, but I’m not sure if this sort of thing has ever been attempted in a work of cinematic fiction before.

Linklater, of course, is a storyteller who reveres the art of naturalism, and Boyhood, though it’s a genuine movie, full of bustlingly staged scenes and performances and motifs and arcs, has the feel of a staged documentary about a fictional character. It’s lively and boisterous and very entertaining to watch, because stuff keeps happening, but the film also rolls forward in an almost Zen manner, so that everything that occurs — an angry family dinner, a camping trip, a haircut, an afternoon of videogames — carries the same wide-eyed, you are here significance. The film has that deadpan Linklater tone of slacker haphazardness, but you could also say that it’s almost Joycean in its appreciation of the scruffy magic of everyday life. READ FULL STORY

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