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Tag: CinemaCon (1-10 of 25)

Why Ivan Reitman won't direct new 'Ghostbusters' movie: 'It wasn't really that hard'

Most things come with a “past due” date, and that includes directing jobs. For Ivan Reitman, the moment he decided to bow out of helming the long-gestating Ghostbusters III occurred when he returned from his friend Harold Ramis’ funeral, held in Chicago last month.

“It wasn’t that hard,” Reitman told EW of the decision. “When I came back from the funeral, I thought it would be better to turn the director’s chores over to someone else and let me produce it.” READ FULL STORY

Shailene Woodley at CinemaCon: Post-'Divergent' madness, 'Fault in Our Stars' love

It’s a confusing time for Shailene Woodley. The lead actress of last weekend’s No. 1 film Divergent stopped off in Vegas in the middle of her worldwide promotional tour to hock her next film, the adaptation of John Green’s best-selling novel The Fault in Our Stars. And it’s easy for her two worlds to get garbled.

“I was just saying that Fault is about two kids with cancer who jump off buildings and run on trains,” she says with a laugh. “Wait, is that not right?”

Not quite. For the uninitiated, Woodley is transitioning from lead actress in a YA dystopian sci-fi adventure to lead actress in a YA romance about two teenagers with cancer. Just don’t call it a cancer movie.

“People ask me in interviews all the time, ‘How did it feel to play a cancer patient?’ I didn’t play a cancer patient. I played a girl who happened to be leading this life and happened to have ‘a touch of cancer,'” she says, in reference to a line from Green’s novel. “This book — and movie — they don’t victimize death, they empower life. That should be the tagline.” READ FULL STORY

Christopher Nolan chats 3-D, 'Interstellar,' and his newfound love for Matthew McConaughey at CinemaCon

Christopher Nolan has never been one to reveal much in interviews, especially ones conducted while he’s in the middle of post-production on a film. So it’s lucky Hollywood Reporter film critic Todd McCarthy got as much out of the secretive director, who is currently finishing up his first cut of his new film Interstellar, as he did during the CinemaCon lunch Wednesday.

What we did learn: Nolan is holding steadfast in his commitment to shooting on film, despite the industry’s overwhelming conversion to digital projection. (In fact, Paramount Pictures — the distributor of Nolan’s film — is making an exception by releasing the movie in film and digital. Most of its other releases will debut only in the high-tech format.)

Also, Nolan is not yet convinced of 3-D movies, primarily because he believes it limits “the shared audience experience.” However, the director was particularly impressed by Baz Luhrmann’s use of the extra dimension in The Great Gatsby. “I thought the 3-D was an absolutely extraordinary thing to see,” he said during the lunch, attended primarily by theater owners and technology companies. “My resistance to 3-D is what I think is right for the things I want to make.”

Nolan — who has cast Matthew McConaughey in his upcoming space story, due Nov. 7 — says he was convinced of the recent Academy Award winner’s range after seeing an early cut of his work in Jeff Nichols’ 2012 film Mud. “I admired him as a movie star and I knew he was a good actor, but I didn’t know how much potential he had until I saw that early cut. It was a transformative performance,” he says.

While Nolan wouldn’t reveal much about what McConaughey’s character does in his upcoming movie, he did say he “plays an everyman, someone who is relatable, someone the audience could experience the extraordinary events of the film with.”

And hiring McConaughey made this year’s Oscar season a bit more conflicted for the director, who reminded the audience that he had worked with three of the five Best Actor nominees in his past movies: McConaughey, Christian Bale (The Dark Knight), and Leonardo DiCaprio (Inception). “I didn’t know who to root for,” he said with a laugh.

While spare with the details, Nolan’s new film seems to be bringing out the nostalgia in the 43-year-old director. Raised in both the U.S. and London, he remembers seeing Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey when he was 7 years old and it being an indelible experience. “I remember the feeling of magnitude and otherworldly experience. I remember the feeling of how big the screen was,” he says. “I had no idea what the film meant, but I had this extraordinary time being taken away to another world.”

That experience clearly stayed with the director, who said he wanted to re-create the tone of “the golden age of blockbusters” that he experienced when he was a child.

“Family film [back then] could be very broad-based and universal in its appeal. It’s something I want to see again, in terms of the tone of the film. It’s not just a film that someone watches, but has an experience. It harkens back to films I grew up with — films that took me to the place I had never imagined.”

Angelina Jolie debuts 'Unbroken' footage at CinemaCon

When prestige is what you’re going for, it certainly doesn’t hurt to have one of the most famous women in the world as your centerpiece. And so onto the stage strode Angelina Jolie, stunning in white, to introduce her second directorial effort, the adaptation of Laura Hillenbrand’s Unbroken, to an audience of theater owners at Tuesday’s CinemaCon.

According to Universal Pictures chairwoman Donna Langley, it was Jolie’s chase of Olympian and POW Louis Zamperini’s story that pushed this project — originally developed by the studio in 1957 as a starring vehicle for Tony Curtis — to the big screen. Called “a force of nature” by Langley, Jolie took center stage to tell the story of Zamperini, a running star in the 1936 Olympics, who was shot down in a B-24 over a Japanese island and taken prisoner along with his survivors.

Jack O’Connell is playing Zamperini in a film shot by Oscar-nominated cinematographer Roger Deakins and scored by Oscar-nominated composer Alexandre Desplat.

READ FULL STORY

First 'Fifty Shades' footage debuts at CinemaCon

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It’s the question Universal Pictures Chairman Donna Langley gets asked most often: “How do you make a movie out of Fifty Shades?” Her answer: very carefully.

It’s Tuesday at the annual theater chain convention CinemaCon, and Universal Pictures concluded its lengthy slate presentation with the footage Fifty Shades fans have been waiting breathlessly to see since the studio bought the rights to the best-selling novels last year.

But rather then fill the five-minute teaser with the sex that made the books by British author E L James so popular, the studio went against expectations and highlighted the romance between the two leads: virginal college student Anastasia Steele (played by Dakota Johnson) and 28-year-old domineering billionaire Christian Grey (Jamie Dornan). READ FULL STORY

CinemaCon honoree Kathleen Kennedy talks 'Star Wars'

You may not know her name, but you’ve likely seen it numerous times — on the credits of such films as E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, Schindler’s List, Seabiscuit, and Lincoln.

For serving in various production capacities on those and some 60 other big-screen movies, as well as for her humanitarian and philanthropic efforts, Kathleen Kennedy was named 2013 Pioneer of the Year Wednesday night by film exhibitors at their annual CinemaCon convention. READ FULL STORY

Hollywood having a 'ball' with previews at CinemaCon

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Hollywood is making the low-blow a higher art form.

That’s one way to look at the escalation of exotic testicle mayhem on the preview screens at CinemaCon, the Las Vegas convention where studios show theater exhibitors the next big thing in film entertainment.

Judging by the first two days of presentations, it’s clear that Hollywood will be keeping its eye on the ball through the end of 2014. Consider: READ FULL STORY

CinemaCon: Fast & Furious 7 set for 2014 release

The Fast and the Furious franchise is still picking up speed: Vin Diesel says the Universal Pictures series will return July 11, 2014, with a seventh film.

The gravel-voiced action star made the announcement on stage at CinemaCon — a Las Vegas convention of movie exhibitors — while flanked by costars, among them Michelle Rodriguez, Paul Walker, and Tyrese Gibson, who took turns expressing their gratitude to be part of a film series that has defied even their own expectations with its box office horsepower.

The sixth film arrives May 24 and, according to Universal Pictures, the the fan interest being tracked by social media and marketing research shows the brand is getting bigger as racks up more mileage. Insidious director James Wan is slated to direct, taking over from Justin Lin.
READ FULL STORY

'Pitch Perfect' sequel coming in 2015

Universal announced at its CinemaCon presentation today that it plans to produce a Pitch Perfect sequel that would hit theaters sometime in 2015. The reveal doesn’t come as too much of a surprise to anyone who’s been paying attention.

Pitch Perfect earned $112 million worldwide against a slight $17 million budget, and in the months since its theatrical run, it has kept hitting new high notes. According to Universal, the film has earned over $90 million across all home market platforms, and it currently stands as the studio’s third highest-grossing VOD title ever behind blockbusters Ted and Bridesmaids. On top of that, the Pitch Perfect soundtrack has sold over 636,000 copies and spawned a hit single — complete with its own music video – with Anna Kendrick’s “Cups.”
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Peter Jackson responds to complaints about 'The Hobbit' footage -- EXCLUSIVE

Peter Jackson says the negative reaction this week over new technology he’s using to shoot The Hobbit won’t hold him back, and he hopes moviegoers will give it a try and judge for themselves.

“Nobody is going to stop,” he said. “This technology is going to keep evolving.”

When Warner Bros. showed off 10 minutes of footage this week at CinemaCon, the annual convention for theater owners, many attendees complained that this version of Middle Earth looked more like a movie set than the atmospheric, textured world seen in The Lord of the Rings trilogy.

There was a lot of love for Jackson’s storytelling — the scenes of young Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman, from the British version of The Office) battling a trio of goblins, and Ian McKellen’s Gandalf exploring the tombs of the now-reanimated wringwraiths, received universal praise. Complaints only centered on the technology used to capture and project the footage.

Jackson hopes critics of the format will change their minds when they see the finished film, but notes that it will also be available in traditional formats in many theaters.

“At first it’s unusual because you’ve never seen a movie like this before. It’s literally a new experience, but you know, that doesn’t last the entire experience of the film–not by any stretch, [just] 10 minutes or so,” Jackson tells EW. “That’s a different experience than if you see a fast-cutting montage at a technical presentation.”

So what does he say to people who just decide they don’t like the glossy new look of the format he’s using?

READ FULL STORY

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