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Tag: Deaths (1-10 of 14)

Oscar-nominated actress Martha Hyer dies at 89

Martha Hyer, best known for her Oscar-nominated turn as Frank Sinatra’s love interest in 1958’s Some Came Running, died May 31 in her Santa Fe home. The actress was 89.

Born in Fort Worth, Texas in 1924, Hyer studied theater at Northwestern University before joining the Pasadena Playhouse in California. There, she was spotted by a Hollywood talent agent and later signed a three-year contract with RKO Pictures.

Hyer married the director C. Ray Stahl in 1951. Stahl went on to direct his wife in the African safari film The Scarlet Spear in 1954, the same year the couple divorced. But 1954 wasn’t a total wash for Hyer: She had her first big break appearing in Billy Wilder’s romantic comedy Sabrina with Audrey Hepburn and Humphrey Bogart, playing the fiancée of William Holden’s character. Other film work included The Delicate Delinquent with Jerry Lewis, Houseboat with Cary Grant, and Once Upon a Horse with Dean Martin. Many have speculated that Hyer found success because she served as an unofficial replacement for Grace Kelly, who had recently retired from acting following her marriage to the Prince of Monaco, Rainier III. READ FULL STORY

'Searching for Sugar Man' director Malik Bendjelloul found dead

Malik Bendjelloul, the Swedish filmmaker who won an Oscar for directing the documentary Searching for Sugar Man, was found dead Tuesday in Stockholm. He was 36.

According to The Associated Press, police spokesperson Pia Glenvik confirmed the death but did not specify the cause, though she ruled out crime as a possible reason. READ FULL STORY

'Ghostbusters' co-star Dan Aykroyd, director Ivan Reitman on Harold Ramis' death

Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis were perhaps best known for fighting ghosts, but the pair worked together both on and off screen. In addition to acting together in Ghostbusters and Ghostbusters II, Ramis and Aykroyd also had a hand in writing both films. And with the recent news of Ramis’ death, Aykroyd said goodbye to a friend:

“Deeply saddened to hear of the passing of my brilliant, gifted, funny friend, co-writer/performer and teacher Harold Ramis. May he now get the answers he was always seeking,”  Aykroyd said in an email.

Ghostbusters director Ivan Reitman also released a statement to EW about his friend’s passing:

“The world has lost a wonderful, truly original, comedy voice with the passing of Harold Ramis,” Reitman said. “He possessed the most agile mind I’ve ever witnessed. He always had the clearest sense of what was funny and how to create something in a new clever way. He was very generous about making everyone around him look better and smarter. Harold had an extraordinary impact on my career and I loved him like a brother. My heart goes out to his children, and his lovely wife, Erica. He will be profoundly missed.”

Comedic legend Harold Ramis dead at 69

Harold Ramis, the man behind films such as Groundhog Day and Caddyshack, died this morning from complications relating to auto-immune inflammatory vasculitis. Ramis had battled the condition for the past four years and was surrounded by family and friends in his Chicago home when he died. He was 69.

Ramis’ big break came in 1978, when he co-wrote National Lampoon’s Animal House, after which he went on to co-write Stripes, Ghostbusters, and Ghostbusters II. Ramis made his directorial debut with 1980’s Caddyshack, followed by National Lampoon’s Vacation. His most recent project was 2009’s Year One, which starred Jack Black and Michael Cera.

Ramis is survived by his wife, Erica, sons Julian and Daniel, daughter Violet, and two grandchildren.

Holocaust survivor Alice Herz Sommers, subject of Oscar-nominated doc, dies at 110

The-Lady-in-Number-6.jpg

Alice Herz Sommers, the woman featured in the 2014 Oscar-nominated documentary short The Lady in Number 6: Music Saved My Life, passed away Sunday at the age of 110.

Sommers was the world’s oldest living Holocaust survivor. The Lady in Number 6 told the story of her life, focusing on the uplifting effect piano playing had on both her spirit and those around her.

“Telling Alice’s story was a life-changing experience for everyone who worked  on the film,” director Malcolm Clark and producer Nick Reed said in a statement to EW. “Even as her energy slowly diminished, her bright spirit never faltered. Her life force was so strong we could never imagine her not being  around. We are so proud to been so fortunate to capture Alice’s  lessons for all the generations to come. We can all learn so much from this most amazing woman.”

Watch a trailer for The Lady in Number 6 below.

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Cannes-winner and long take master Miklos Jancso dies at 92

Hungarian filmmaker Miklós Jancsó, winner of the best director award at the 1972 Cannes Film Festival, died Friday. He was 92.

Jancsó’s death after a long illness was announced by the Association of Hungarian Film Artists.

Known for his long takes and for depicting the passage of time in his historical epics merely by changes of costume, Jancsó won his Cannes award for Red Psalm, about a 19th-century peasant revolt.

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Former Academy President Tom Sherak dies at 68

Tom Sherak, a storied figure in the industry who is perhaps best known for serving as the President of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, died Tuesday at his home in Calabasas, Calif., after a long battle with prostate cancer. He was 68.

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James Gandolfini 'didn't have a lot of confidence' acting in 'Enough Said,' says director

James Gandolfini took on his first ever romantic comedy in the months before his tragic death on June 19 — and it didn’t come as naturally to the Sopranos star as his numerous tough-guy roles.

In Nicole Holofcener’s Enough Said, Gandolfini plays Albert, a divorcee who falls for Julia Louis-Dreyfus’ Eve, a divorced masseuse who’s facing an empty nest as her daughter prepares to leave for college. Eve loves Albert, but when she finds out that he’s the ex-husband of her friend/client, Marianne (Catherin Keener), she begins to question their relationship.

Louis-Dreyfus, who was cast first, loved the idea of working with Gandolfini. “When I brought up the idea of Jim, she was like, ‘Hell yeah! He’s sexy,’ says Holofcener. Unsurprisingly, the Veep actress felt more comfortable with the comedic stylings of Enough Said than Gandolfini. “Julia’s just a hilarious person,” says the director, who remembers a moment on set when she and Dreyfus simply could stop laughing. “We’re doubled over, and Jim is standing there like, ‘Oh my god, I think I signed up to be in a chick flick.’” READ FULL STORY

Michael Ansara, Kang on 'Star Trek', dies at 91

Michael Ansara, the actor best known for playing Kang, a Klingon warrior on three versions of Star Trek, died Wednesday at the age of 91 at his home in Calabasas, CA. The Hollywood Reporter first reported the news.

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TV anchor, 'RoboCop' actor Mario Machado dead at 78

Emmy-winning TV news anchor Mario Machado — who also played a newsman in television and movies for more than 30 years — died Saturday of complications from pneumonia, his daughter confirmed to The Los Angeles Times. He was 78.

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