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Tag: Documentary (21-30 of 183)

Watch Alec Baldwin playfully call his '30 Rock' mom Elaine Stritch a bitch in a new doc - EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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If you thought Alec Baldwin was cantankerous, even he pales compared to the veteran Broadway and TV star Elaine Stritch. In Chiemi Karasawa’s new documentary Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me, opening in limited release this Friday, the 89-year-old actress (and Today show F-bomb-dropper) recounts her turbulent life on the stage and screen, her battles with alcoholism, and her improbable comeback in the last decade. In this exclusive clip, we see Stritch on the set of 30 Rock, where she played the wasp-tongued mother of Alec Baldwin’s network exec Jack Donaghy (a role that earned the actress her third Emmy Award in 2008). On set, she mixes it up with Tina Fey and Baldwin, a kindred spirit who hilariously grumbles about the veteran scene-stealer in rehearsal. “Don’t you last-word me, you,” he says. “It’s my laugh-line, you bitch.” And her reaction to his grousing is just as priceless. READ FULL STORY

Mick Jagger! Orson Welles! Giant worms! Check out the trailer for 'Jodorowsky's Dune' -- VIDEO

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Would you see a big-budget adaptation of Frank Herbert’s classic sci-fi novel Dune directed by genius-madman Alejandro Jodorowsky and starring Mick Jagger, Orson Welles, and Salvador Dali?

So would I — but, alas, we never will. In the mid-’70s, Hollywood studios declined to finance just such a project after Jodorowsky spent a couple of years prepping the movie with a band of hugely gifted artists including future Alien creators H.R. Giger and Dan O’Bannon. (In fairness to the studio execs, they may have been justifiably reluctant to invest in a project which Jodorowsky himself believed might be as many as 20 hours long).

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'Tim's Vermeer': Teller talks (yes, talks!) about his astounding documentary

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In the new documentary Tim’s Vermeer, Texas-based inventor and non-painter Tim Jenison attempts to prove that seventeenth century artist Dutch Johannes Vermeer used an optical device to craft his masterpieces by adopting that technique to painstakingly recreate Vermeer’s The Music Lesson. If that sounds like a snooze on paper, the film is anything but, partly thanks to Penn Jillette‘s enthusiastic narration, and his magic-partner Teller’s assured direction. but mostly because of the possibility Jenison might actually drive himself insane attempting to complete his Herculean task. (EW’s Owen Gleiberman recently described the movie as “exquisitely fun” in his “A”-grade review.)

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Sundance 2014: In Iran, a schoolgirl shoots for the stars in 'Sepideh'

Danish director Berit Madsen didn’t set out to tell a story about feminism in Iran. She just met a pretty amazing 14-year-old girl who wanted to learn about the stars, and hoped to do justice to her story.

“I’d heard about this place which had an astronomy club going on and this teacher who wanted to build an observatory, and that boys and girls would go out alone to watch the stars,” Madsen, director of the Sundance documentary Sepideh, tells EW. “Even knowing Iran it was  bizarre to me, because you’re not supposed to expect stuff like that to happen.”

Madsen’s film follows the life of the titular teenager, who grows from a young girl obsessed with Albert Einstein into a woman engaged to be married and heading to university to study astronomy.

Sepideh is screening this week at the Sundance Film Festival, and is also being released exclusively on iTunes in the U.S. and Canada, coinciding with its Sundance premiere.

We talked to Madsen about how she connected with Sepideh and how making this film over the past five years has lead her to work on new projects about the Middle East:
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Sundance 2014: What happened at Penn State was not anomalous at all, says 'Happy Valley' director

The passion for college football in certain parts of our country almost resembles a cult in its intensity. And perhaps no team had a more devoted following than Joe Paterno’s Penn State program, which proudly won “the right way” on and off the field ever since he became head coach in 1966. His reputation was nonpareil in the sports world — until former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky was indicted in Nov. 2011 for molesting young boys on the Penn State campus. Paterno, then 85 years old, was fired, along with three other top University administrators, rocking the Penn State community, a.k.a. Happy Valley, to its core.

Into that storm came filmmaker Amir Bar-Lev (The Tillman Story). Happy Valley, which premiered this week at the Sundance Film Festival, captures the pain, the outrage, and the conflicting passions of people caught in the maelstrom. With interviews with State College locals, Penn State students, the Paterno family, and Sandusky’s adopted son, Matt, the film paints a complicated portrait of a community still recovering. There are powerful scenes in which an artist paints over Sandusky in a Penn State mural, adds a halo to Paterno’s portrait… and then takes it off as more sad news breaks. There is another sequence where a man protests by standing near the stadium’s Paterno statue with a sign calling the coach an enabler, and the angry reaction it elicits from loyal fans who drove miles to pay homage to their hero is all you need to know about the town’s torn soul.

“What I tried to do is give the audience the puzzle I’ve been working with for 18 months, and turn it around in your head and maybe conclude the same things I did — and maybe different things,” Bar-Lev said after an early screening. In fact, the early reactions to the film were all across the board. Some viewers concluded that Paterno and his superiors were complicit and that our universal obsession with athletics blinded well-intentioned people. But one member of the audience, who identified himself as a relative of Penn State benefactors Louis and Mildred Lasch, walked away with a different impression. “I was very nervous coming into this documentary, but I want to applaud you because I think you did find the truth in what’s a very, very difficult thing,” he said.

The truth. I’m not even sure Bar-Lev would agree that he’s found it. But Happy Valley is a powerful portrait of a wounded community that might not be so different from your own.

The director chatted with EW about his film: READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: What happened AFTER Dock Ellis pitched a no-hitter on LSD? -- EXCLUSIVE POSTER

If you know the name Dock Ellis, it’s probably because of a particularly unorthodox athletic — and medical! — achievement he accomplished in 1970. In the history of professional baseball, there have been 282 no-hitters. Only one of them, as far as we know, was pitched while under the influence of LSD. On June 12, 1970, Ellis, then playing for the Pittsburgh Pirates, tossed a no-hitter against the Padres after dropping acid. If Ellis’s admission of being under the influence isn’t conclusive enough, the box score supports his claim: he beaned three batters and walked eight!

But Ellis was more than just some far-out oddball who must have struggled to remember his greatest moment — though he never grew tired of telling the no-hitter story. As a player, he advocated for African-American ballplayers, pushed for player free-agency, and despite his own struggles with substance abuse, he sobered up in retirement and became a counselor for other addicts. In No No: A Dockumentary, which premieres at the Sundance Film Festival on Jan. 20, director Jeffrey Radice paints a fuller picture of the man, on and off the field. “Dock was very outspoken and a friend of Muhammad Ali in that era where there was so much work still to be done in the civil rights area,” says Trevor Groth, Sundance’s director of programing. “He was this really larger than life character that, I think, even the people who know that one anecdote, don’t really have a sense of who he was and the impact he made. And I think this film will do justice to his legacy.”

The Dock-umentary has some eclectic collaborators, with the Beastie Boys’ Adam Horowitz providing the original score, and a vibrant poster from artist Ernesto Yerena (and advised upon by Shepard Fairey and Glen E. Friedman).

Click below for the Kickstarter video for the film, as well as James Blagden‘s animated interpretation of Ellis’s technicolor no-no. READ FULL STORY

Werner Herzog talks about acclaimed doc 'The Act of Killing' -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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In the documentary The Act of Killing, Indonesian death squad members are persuaded to recreate atrocities they committed during the ’60s as if they were acting in Hollywood movies. As compelling as it is disturbing the Drafthouse Films release is on the Oscars shortlist for best documentary feature and just this weekend shared the best non-fiction film trophy with At Berkeley at the National Society of Film Critics Awards.

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New Justin Bieber 'Believe' trailer: 'It's back to being the underdog' -- VIDEO

With his latest documentary, Believe, Justin Bieber is asking his fans to “forget the hype, forget the headlines, forget the rumors.” Instead, he’s asking them to “believe the truth.”

The newest trailer for Believe addresses Bieber’s struggle with his bad-boy image and the trials of being a teenage superstar. With everybody trying to tear him apart, how will he react?

Watch the trailer below:
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Martin Scorsese wants your support for Indiegogo campaign of Roger Ebert doc 'Life Itself' -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

Martin Scorsese gives it two thumbs up — and thinks you should too.

In an EW exclusive, the Oscar-winning director shares his thoughts on film critic Roger Ebert and the upcoming documentary on Ebert’s life and legacy, Life Itself. Directed by Steve James (Hoop Dreams, The Interrupters), the documentary is based on the well-known critic and film lover’s eponymous memoir. It chronicles his life as an advocate for great cinema and his inspiring battle with cancer.

The video also marks the launch of Life Itself‘s Indiegogo campaign to complete the film, currently in post-production. One of the key benefits for supporters who donate $25 or more is an early private screening of the doc prior to its official theatrical release. The campaign hopes to reach the goal of $150,000 with additional proceeds above the goal going towards charities close to Ebert, such as the Roger & Chaz Ebert Foundation.

Watch the heartfelt video below:
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Justin Bieber's 'Believe' trailer: 'You could be the next train wreck' -- VIDEO

In case you hadn’t noticed, Justin Bieber is no longer just some “kid on YouTube.” In fact, since his last documentary, we’ve seen his star continue to rise — and potentially start to fall.

Now, Bieber has released the trailer for his next film, Believe, in which we see him literally grow wings and fly. As he explains it: “When you’ve reached a certain point in your life, there are people out there waiting to see you fall. But rather than let gravity take you down, sometimes you have to take matters into your own hands and fly.”

Featuring interviews with Usher and others close to the Biebs, this documentary examines everything from Bieber’s continued success to his unfortunate run-ins with the paparazzi, and even why he wears his pants so low. Watch the laughter, the tears, and one little wink in the trailer below:
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