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Tag: Documentary (71-80 of 194)

'Room 237': Check out the poster for the awesome new documentary about Stanley Kubrick's 'The Shining' -- EXCLUSIVE

In Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 horror classic The Shining, Scatman Crothers’ chef Hallorann warns Danny Lloyd’s Danny to stay the hell away from room 237 of the Overlook Hotel — which turns out to excellent, if ignored, advice. But while room 237 is to be avoided, the new documentary Room 237 is a must-see, one which EW’s Owen Gleiberman has described as a “mesmerizing pop-art document.” The work of first-time director Rodney Ascher, the film showcases the theories of five obsessive Shining fans as to what Kubrick really intended with his Stephen King adaptation and features footage from both that snowy chiller and many others.

Room 237 opens theatrically on March 29 and will also be available on VOD, SundanceNOW, and other digital outlets from that date. You can check out the film’s trailer, synopsis, and — exclusively — the new Room 237 poster below.

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SXSW: Snowfort Pictures founder Travis Stevens talks 'Big Ass Spider,' 'Cheap Thrills,' and more

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One of the first things future Snowfort Pictures founder Travis Stevens did after arriving in Los Angeles was hit Tom Cruise in the head. “I moved to L.A. with a degree in filmmaking and I thought I would be hired to make films,” he recalls. “Within a couple of months I realized ‘No’. So I started doing work as an extra just to be on a set.” One of the movies Stevens worked on was 1996’s Cruise-starring Jerry Maguire. “There’s this scene where Tom Cruise gets out of a limo and there’s all these reporters,” continues Stevens. “For some reason they gave me this big telephoto lense on my camera and in one of the early takes I smacked him him right in the head. I almost crapped my pants. I was like, ‘Oh my god, I’ve just killed my career.'”

As it happens, Stevens’ career would turn out just fine. In 2010, the now seasoned film exec founded Snowfort Pictures, a boutique production company specializing in smarter-than-average — or so-called “elevated” — genre movies, and immediately impressed horror fans with A Horrible Way To Die from director Adam Wingard and writer Simon Barrett (the pair responsible for this summer’s much-tipped You’re Next). Stevens now has two films debuting at this month’s SXSW — the rather self-explanatory Big Ass Spider and the black comedy-thriller Cheap Thrills — and a number of other projects in the pipeline, including the documentary Jodorowsky’s Dune and the revenge movie American Muscle.

We asked Travis to walk us through his upcoming slate of movie mayhem. READ FULL STORY

SXSW: Spielberg, Lucas, and Scorsese pay tribute in trailer for 'Milius' doc -- VIDEO

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It is a nice coincidence that the trailer for a new documentary about filmmaker John Milius should arrive as the Big Lebowski is celebrating its 15th anniversary, given the writer-director was one of the inspirations for John Goodman’s war-obsessed gun nut Walter Sobchak. But the clip for Milius also serves as a reminder that that piece of trivia is one of the less interesting things about this larger-than-life character who brought us Big Wednesday, Conan the Barbarian, Dillinger, and Red Dawn, and who also cowrote Apocalypse Now and had a hand in penning the U.S.S. Indianapolis monologue in Jaws.

Milius is screening at SXSW tomorrow. You can check out the trailer below. READ FULL STORY

SXSW: Check out artist Paul Pope's new poster for documentary 'William and the Windmill' -- EXCLUSIVE IMAGE AND VIDEO

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Real-life stories don’t get much more remarkable than that of William Kamkwamaba, a young Malawian who rescued his family from famine by constructing a power-generating windmill from junk parts. Kamkwamaba related his story in the 2009 bestseller The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind and he is now the subject of the SXSW-screening documentary William and the Windmill from director Ben Nabors, which details both his original story and his subsequent brush with fame.

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'The Bitter Buddha': Director Steven Feinartz on his documentary about cult stand-up comedian Eddie Pepitone

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Were you to ask 100 passers-by to list their favorite stand-ups it is unlikely any of them would mention the name Eddie Pepitone. But were you to ask any random group of comedians the same question it might be a different matter. The New Yorker has long been a fixture on the L.A. comedy scene and his rage-fueled rants are beloved by the likes of Sarah Silverman, Marc Maron, and Patton Oswalt, all of whom appear in the new documentary about Pepitone, The Bitter Buddha.

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Tribeca Film Festival announces 2013 film opener

The Tribeca Film Festival has just announced that the world premiere of Mistaken for Strangers will open the 2013 festival. Mistaken for Strangers, directed by Tom Berninger, chronicles Berninger’s experience on tour with his brother, The National’s front man Matt Berninger.

Mistaken for Strangers exemplifies the independent spirit and vitality that Tribeca is excited to showcase every year,” said Geoff Gilmore, Chief Creative Officer, in a release. “We are thrilled to open with a film that embodies the journey of an independent filmmaker, and is at its core a highly personal and lighthearted story about brotherly love. It will be a great night of both indie film and music.” READ FULL STORY

'Inocente': An artist's journey from homelessness to the Academy Awards

Affleck and Hathaway, Lawrence and Day-Lewis may have been the most notable winners on Sunday night, the artists who cemented their Hollywood legacies at the 2013 Academy Awards. But no one’s life has changed more this year from starring in an Oscar-winning movie than Inocente Izucar. The name might not ring a bell, but you’ll remember the acceptance speech for Best Documentary Short, when Inocente‘s co-director Sean Fine introduced her to the world. “We want to thank this young lady who was homeless just a year ago and now she’s standing in front of all of you,” he said. “She’s an artist and all of you are artists and we feel like we need to start supporting the arts. They’re dying in our communities. And all of us artists, we need to stand up and help girls like her be seen and heard. It’s so important. Thank you.”

Fine and his wife and collaborator, Andrea Nix Fine, discovered Izucar in San Diego four years ago, when the Oscar-nominated duo (War Dance) were searching for subjects for a documentary about homelessness. Then 15, Izucar and her family moved 30 times in the previous nine years, never living in the same place for more than three months. Her father, who’d illegally brought his family north of the border when Izucar was a child, had been deported back to Mexico, and her mother struggled to support her four children, toiling at a series of low-paying odd jobs. But it wasn’t her plight that made Izucar so compelling a subject; it was her talent and her spirit. She is a promising artist who starts each day painting bright and extravagant makeup on her face, and after the filmmakers connected with her through a San Diego non-profit called ARTS: A Reason to Survive that supports at-risk youngsters, they spent the next two years documenting her life. “I don’t even want to imagine where I would be if there wasn’t the documentary and everything that’s going on with it,” says Izucar. “I’m really thankful to Sean and Andrea.” READ FULL STORY

Michael Moore aids detained Oscar-nominated Palestinian filmmaker

Michael Moore couldn’t save Flint, Michigan’s auto plants in the ’80s — but he did help to get Palestinian filmmaker Emad Burnat released from LAX’s detention room last night. Burnat is currently up for a Best Documentary Oscar for his film 5 Broken Cameras.

Burnat and his family arrived in Los Angeles last night in order to attend this week’s Academy Awards ceremony. But before they could exit the city’s main airport, they were “held at US immigration for about an hour and questioned about the purpose of my visit to the United States,” Burnat said in a statement. “Immigration officials asked for proof that I was nominated for an Academy Award…they told me that if I couldn’t prove the reason for my visit, my wife Soraya, my son Gibreel and I would be sent back to Turkey on the same day.”

Luckily, Burnat was able to send a text to Michael Moore, one of the Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science’s Documentary Branch.  READ FULL STORY

Oscars 2013: Spotlighting the documentary short film nominees

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The Oscar-nominated documentary shorts tend to be a little more sobering than the animated and live action shorts. These filmmakers are attempting to show current realities, no matter how difficult or unpleasant they might be. But there is also beauty amid the pain.

There’s the 15-year-old homeless girl who finds comfort in her art, the stoic and hard working canners in New York, the sick but brave Rwandan children treated by another country’s generosity, the Long Island cancer patients who lose all their hair but gain a lot more, and the retirement community residents who find moments of joy in the middle of old age’s toughest moments.

With just over a week left before the Oscars, EW spoke to the directors of all the nominated documentary shorts for this deep dive into the category.

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They're back again: Backstreet Boys documentary in production

Former ‘N Syncer Justin Timberlake might’ve taken the stage at last night’s Grammy’s, but Timberlake’s ’90s rival, The Backstreet Boys, have a little something up their sleeves as well. A Backstreet Boys documentary is currently in production by Pulse Films and is set to be finished this fall.

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