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'Blade Runner,' 'Pulp Fiction,' 'Terms of Endearment' among films to screen at AFI Night at the Movies

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Harrison Ford travels across the skyline of a dark, futuristic Los Angeles. Shrek perilously treks over a moat of lava. A man you thought was human grotesquely morphs into an alien creature. These scenes from Blade Runner, Shrek, The Thing, and more will be on the big screen at an event presented by the American Film Institute later this month.

The lineup for the event, AFI Night at the Movies, was unveiled Tuesday. AFI President and CEO Bob Gazzale calls the event “a film festival on speed” — 12 films will screen simultaneously in the Arclight Hollywood on Wednesday, April 24. The event will take over the Los Angeles venue, using every auditorium, including the 32- by 68-foot Cinerama Dome, where 1967 mystery film In the Heat of the Night will screen with an introduction by Sidney Poitier.

Gazzale told EW, “Ultimately what we’re looking for is an evening that crosses genres, everything from animation to romantic comedy to sci-fi, and then also crosses decades. We want to be certain that we’ve got a lifespan of movies hereā€¦ that shows what the art form does across the years.”

Check out the full list of films, along with the actor introducing each one, below: READ FULL STORY

Dennis Hopper was the most visionary of all Hollywood bad boys

dennis-hopperImage Credit: Everett CollectionIn a world of fake bad boys, he was the true article — a natural-born rule breaker, a Hollywood rebel who took midnight rides on the wild side with James Dean, a scraggly-haired hippie too hip (and too dark) to let the sunshine in. Dennis Hopper, who died Saturday at 74, was an actor and a filmmaker who tore through boundaries not just because he didn’t like them; most often, he didn’t even see them. I’ll never forget the one time I got to be in a room with him. It was August 1979, at the Saturday morning press conference after the very first American showing of Apocalypse Now. The screening had taken place the night before, at the Ziegfeld Theatre in Manhattan. I was a bratty college journalist who’d squeezed my way in and was still reeling from the movie: its hallucinatory power and majesty and violent strangeness. (The “Ride of the Valkyries” sequence was so indelible that it kept popping back into your mind’s eye, like your very own searing cinematic Vietnam flashback.)

At the press conference, they were mostly all there, the maverick artists who had toiled away on this movie for half a decade: Francis Ford Coppola, who took the opportunity to make his first feverish pronouncements on the brave new world of technology we were all about to enter (he called it “the communications revolution,” and though few knew what he was talking about, 30 years later, it’s clear that he was right); Robert Duvall and Martin Sheen, the latter of whom had priceless tales of working with the elephantine and eccentric Marlon Brando (who, naturally, hadn’t bothered to show up to talk to a bunch of journalists); and Hopper, who instantly took on the role of flaked-out druggie court jester of the press conference. The more stonerish and cosmic, and the less coherent, he was, the more that he ended up dominating the questions and answers, cracking up everyone in the room, though whether we were laughing with him or at him was, by the end, an open question. READ FULL STORY

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