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Tag: Ethan Hawke (1-10 of 36)

Ethan Hawke reflects on his career at NYFF celebration

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For Ethan Hawke, the past two years have resulted in a series of culminations. Last year, Before Midnight, which closed out his trilogy with Richard Linklater and Julie Delpy, premiered at the Sundance Film Festival; Boyhood, which he made with Linklater over 12 years, premiered there this year. And now he’s celebrating the completion of his documentary, Seymour: An Introduction, as it makes stops at various film festivals. So it makes sense that Hawke was prone to look backwards when feted at the New York Film Festival during its “An Evening With…” event. READ FULL STORY

New York Film Festival to honor Richard Gere, Ethan Hawke

The Film Society of Lincoln Center is set to honor two actors during this year’s New York Film Festival. First up, Ethan Hawke will sit down for “An Evening With” segment on September 30, during which he will participate in an “intimate dinner and a conversation between the guests and NYFF Director Kent Jones,” according to a press release.

Then, on Oct. 8, Richard Gere will do the same. For the festival, which is in its 52nd year, the “An Evening With” segment is meant to recognize “the work of individuals who have made significant artistic contributions to film culture, and will continue to do so in the future,” per the release. Past honorees include Nicole Kidman, David Cronenberg, Cate Blanchett, and Ralph Fiennes, among others.

Both Hawke and Gere have films in this year’s festival, which runs from Sept. 26 to Oct. 12. Hawke is attending as a director for the documentary Seymour: An Introduction, while Gere stars in Oren Moverman’s Time Out of Mind.

TIFF: Ethan Hawke on 'Good Kill' and his post-'Boyhood' blues

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Ethan Hawke is on a roll. Last year, he was nominated for another screenwriting Academy Award for Before Midnight, while also starring in the horror film, The Purge, his biggest hit since Training Day. This year, he’s kept it going with Boyhood, the best-reviewed film of the year that has him in the hunt for a Best Supporting Actor nomination.

Add to that Good Kill, which debuted last week at the Venice Film Festival and screens at Toronto on Sept. 9. The film marks Hawke’s third collaboration with director Andrew Niccol, who helmed Gattaca and Lord of War, and co-stars Bruce Greenwood and January Jones. In Good Kill, Hawke plays Maj. Tom Egan, an Air Force pilot who has reluctantly traded the wild blue yonder for remote-controlling the deadly drones that rain down on the Middle East’s most dangerous regions from the comfort of home. “Every time I would sit and read the paper and read about a drone strike, I kind of had no idea what that really meant,” says Hawke. “I think I pictured some drone from Star Wars or something. But the reality is extremely interesting and the hope is to tell a true story about the experiences of the soldiers.”

Hawke spoke with EW about Good Kill and his new documentary, which is also playing at the Toronto Film Festival, as well as his biggest takeaway from the 12-year odyssey that was BoyhoodREAD FULL STORY

Watch Ethan Hawke go Shakespearean (again) in 'Cymbeline' trailer

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Ethan Hawke is no stranger to Shakespearean interpretations onstage or onscreen, and he’s at it again with Cymbeline, re-teaming with his Hamlet director Michael Almereyda. Hawke starred as the eponymous character in that 2000 modern day interpretation of one of Shakespeare’s most famous plays. Now, Hawke and Almereyda are going a little more obscure, and Ed Harris is playing the titular king. Almereyda’s reinterpretation places the story in the world of a biker gang, and has already drawn comparisons to Baz Luhrmann’s Romeo + Juliet, what with all the gunfighting mixed in with iambic pentameter.

The play’s story is complicated, but also features a number of plot points that will be familiar to those who know Shakespeare’s more famous work: There’s a pair of star-crossed lovers (Imogen and Posthumus, played here by Fifty Shades of Grey’s Dakota Johnson and Gossip Girl‘s Penn Badgley), a seduction game, a girl disguised as a boy, ghosts, and even a drug that makes someone appear to be dead. READ FULL STORY

Video: In 'Predestination,' Ethan Hawke is out of time to fight crime

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Blending elements of Memento and Minority ReportPredestination finds Ethan Hawke as a temporal agent, traversing through time to eliminate crime before it happens. His last assignment, however, requires him to recruit his younger self and stop the one criminal he’s never caught.

Hawke previously worked with directors Michael and Peter Spierig on Daybreakers, a post-apocalyptic take on vampire mythology, and this project is a return to similarly high-concept material. Based on science fiction legend Robert A. Heinlein’s short story, All You Zombies (a line Hawke spouts mid-trailer), Predestination deals with everything from time paradoxes to, well, fate and predestination.

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'Boyhood' exclusive: Richard Linklater explains his cinematic experiment -- VIDEO

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Richard Linklater knew he wanted to make a film about childhood. It’s not a revolutionary idea, by any means, but Linklater decided to make it so. Instead of forcing the passage of time with makeup and lighting and different actors, he resolved to film the same cast over the course of a number of years, allowing everyone to actually change and age and grow.

The result is Boyhood, a 12-year glimpse into the lives of a Texas family, starring Ethan Hawke, Patricia Arquette, and Ellar Coltrane. As Owen Gleiberman wrote after Boyhood‘s Sundance premiere: “It touches something deep and true, which is that we grow up to be the people we are by letting every moment form us.”

Watch as Linklater, Hawke, and Arquette discuss the film in a moving featurette after the jump. READ FULL STORY

'Boyhood' trailer: See Richard Linklater's little movie that took 12 years to make

There have been some great movies that capture the idea of childhood in a particular moment in a boy’s life. For example, Stand By Me. But Richard Linklater didn’t want to limit himself to one moment, or one age, or even one decade, as it turns out. For Boyhood, he cast a child (Ellar Coltrane) as his protagonist, Mason, and then built a story around him that he continued for 12 years, until the boy went off to college. It’s not a documentary, like the 7-Up series, but a complete, well-crafted character study. Not only do Coltrane and Linklater’s daughter, Lorelei, who plays Mason’s sister, grow up literally before your eyes, but the parents — Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette — also age and grow and learn.

The cut of the film that screened at Sundance was bursting with nostalgic popular music — songs that may or may not be licensed as part of the finished film — but the trailer makes great use of “Hero” by Family of the Year. It’s the perfect tune to tell this story. Watch the trailer below: READ FULL STORY

Richard Linklater's 'Boyhood' gets summer release date

Richard Linklater’s Boyhood, a movie 12 years in the making, will open in theaters on July 11.

Back in 2002, Linklater had the idea to make a movie about childhood — but rather than telling a story about a singular moment or chapter from growing up, he decided to cast a 6-year-old (Ellar Coltrane) and film him a little bit every year until he went to college. Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette play the boy’s parents, and Linklater’s daughter, Lorelei, plays the boy’s sister.

IFC Films agreed to produce and distribute the film at the outset, and their faith was rewarded when Linklater’s daring, unconventional film wowed audiences at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival. The film went to receive more accolades at the Berlin Film Festival and SXSW.

Sundance 2014: Richard Linklater discusses 12-year process of making 'Boyhood' -- VIDEO

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Director Richard Linklater put an astonishing twist on the classic coming-of-age story when he decided to shoot his latest film, Boyhood, over the course of 12 years. The film follows the life of 7-year-old Mason (Ellar Coltrane) as he grows and makes his way through his formative years from elementary school to high school.

EW’s Sara Vilkomerson sat down with Linklater and Boyhood stars Ethan Hawke (Getaway), Patricia Arquette (Boardwalk Empire), and Ellar Coltrane (Lone Star State of Mind) to discuss the process of making a film whose principle production started 4208 days ago:
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Sundance 2014: Richard Linklater unveils 'Boyhood,' a movie 12 years in the making

It took 39 days for Richard Linklater to make Boyhood. Well, actually, to be more precise, it took him 39 shooting days, spread across 12 years — more than 4,000 days — to complete the ambitious cinematic experiment, which follows a boy and his complicated, constantly evolving family as he grows up. Linklater cast Ellar Coltrane as young Mason when he was only 6 years old, and began shooting in 2002. Every year after, the cast — which includes Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette as Mason’s divorced parents and Linklater’s daughter, Lorelei, as Mason’s sister, Samantha — would reunite for three or four days to film a new chapter in the life of a boy. The finished result — a fluid 12-year odyssey compressed into 164 minutes — premiered last night at the Sundance Film Festival, and critics were quick to heap praise on the filmmaker and the cast.

Linklater had just finished making Waking Life and Tape in 2001 when he sat down to write a film about childhood. But he was stymied by the cinematic limitations of relying on a singular time or event to express all his themes and ideas. “I didn’t really have enough to say about one moment,” he said last night, during a post-screening Q&A. “And so I just got this ‘Eureka’ moment of like, ‘Well, why couldn’t we just shoot a little bit and encompass all of it?’ so that was the idea.”

He pitched the idea to Hawke, his frequent collaborator, before they’d even decided to reunite for Before Sunset, the second in their Before trilogy with Julie Delpy. “We were just sitting at a little cafe in New York, and he got this weird look on his face and said, ‘That’s like the craziest idea… but yeah, I’m in.'” READ FULL STORY

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