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Tag: Ethan Hawke (1-10 of 32)

Video: In 'Predestination,' Ethan Hawke is out of time to fight crime

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Blending elements of Memento and Minority ReportPredestination finds Ethan Hawke as a temporal agent, traversing through time to eliminate crime before it happens. His last assignment, however, requires him to recruit his younger self and stop the one criminal he’s never caught.

Hawke previously worked with directors Michael and Peter Spierig on Daybreakers, a post-apocalyptic take on vampire mythology, and this project is a return to similarly high-concept material. Based on science fiction legend Robert A. Heinlein’s short story, All You Zombies (a line Hawke spouts mid-trailer), Predestination deals with everything from time paradoxes to, well, fate and predestination.

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'Boyhood' exclusive: Richard Linklater explains his cinematic experiment -- VIDEO

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Richard Linklater knew he wanted to make a film about childhood. It’s not a revolutionary idea, by any means, but Linklater decided to make it so. Instead of forcing the passage of time with makeup and lighting and different actors, he resolved to film the same cast over the course of a number of years, allowing everyone to actually change and age and grow.

The result is Boyhood, a 12-year glimpse into the lives of a Texas family, starring Ethan Hawke, Patricia Arquette, and Ellar Coltrane. As Owen Gleiberman wrote after Boyhood‘s Sundance premiere: “It touches something deep and true, which is that we grow up to be the people we are by letting every moment form us.”

Watch as Linklater, Hawke, and Arquette discuss the film in a moving featurette after the jump. READ FULL STORY

'Boyhood' trailer: See Richard Linklater's little movie that took 12 years to make

There have been some great movies that capture the idea of childhood in a particular moment in a boy’s life. For example, Stand By Me. But Richard Linklater didn’t want to limit himself to one moment, or one age, or even one decade, as it turns out. For Boyhood, he cast a child (Ellar Coltrane) as his protagonist, Mason, and then built a story around him that he continued for 12 years, until the boy went off to college. It’s not a documentary, like the 7-Up series, but a complete, well-crafted character study. Not only do Coltrane and Linklater’s daughter, Lorelei, who plays Mason’s sister, grow up literally before your eyes, but the parents — Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette — also age and grow and learn.

The cut of the film that screened at Sundance was bursting with nostalgic popular music — songs that may or may not be licensed as part of the finished film — but the trailer makes great use of “Hero” by Family of the Year. It’s the perfect tune to tell this story. Watch the trailer below: READ FULL STORY

Richard Linklater's 'Boyhood' gets summer release date

Richard Linklater’s Boyhood, a movie 12 years in the making, will open in theaters on July 11.

Back in 2002, Linklater had the idea to make a movie about childhood — but rather than telling a story about a singular moment or chapter from growing up, he decided to cast a 6-year-old (Ellar Coltrane) and film him a little bit every year until he went to college. Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette play the boy’s parents, and Linklater’s daughter, Lorelei, plays the boy’s sister.

IFC Films agreed to produce and distribute the film at the outset, and their faith was rewarded when Linklater’s daring, unconventional film wowed audiences at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival. The film went to receive more accolades at the Berlin Film Festival and SXSW.

Sundance 2014: Richard Linklater discusses 12-year process of making 'Boyhood' -- VIDEO

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Director Richard Linklater put an astonishing twist on the classic coming-of-age story when he decided to shoot his latest film, Boyhood, over the course of 12 years. The film follows the life of 7-year-old Mason (Ellar Coltrane) as he grows and makes his way through his formative years from elementary school to high school.

EW’s Sara Vilkomerson sat down with Linklater and Boyhood stars Ethan Hawke (Getaway), Patricia Arquette (Boardwalk Empire), and Ellar Coltrane (Lone Star State of Mind) to discuss the process of making a film whose principle production started 4208 days ago:
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Sundance 2014: Richard Linklater unveils 'Boyhood,' a movie 12 years in the making

It took 39 days for Richard Linklater to make Boyhood. Well, actually, to be more precise, it took him 39 shooting days, spread across 12 years — more than 4,000 days — to complete the ambitious cinematic experiment, which follows a boy and his complicated, constantly evolving family as he grows up. Linklater cast Ellar Coltrane as young Mason when he was only 6 years old, and began shooting in 2002. Every year after, the cast — which includes Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette as Mason’s divorced parents and Linklater’s daughter, Lorelei, as Mason’s sister, Samantha — would reunite for three or four days to film a new chapter in the life of a boy. The finished result — a fluid 12-year odyssey compressed into 164 minutes — premiered last night at the Sundance Film Festival, and critics were quick to heap praise on the filmmaker and the cast.

Linklater had just finished making Waking Life and Tape in 2001 when he sat down to write a film about childhood. But he was stymied by the cinematic limitations of relying on a singular time or event to express all his themes and ideas. “I didn’t really have enough to say about one moment,” he said last night, during a post-screening Q&A. “And so I just got this ‘Eureka’ moment of like, ‘Well, why couldn’t we just shoot a little bit and encompass all of it?’ so that was the idea.”

He pitched the idea to Hawke, his frequent collaborator, before they’d even decided to reunite for Before Sunset, the second in their Before trilogy with Julie Delpy. “We were just sitting at a little cafe in New York, and he got this weird look on his face and said, ‘That’s like the craziest idea… but yeah, I’m in.'” READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Richard Linklater's entrancing 'Boyhood' captures the Zen of growing up

Richard Linklater’s Boyhood, which premiered at Sundance last night, is an entrancing, one-of-a-kind act of dramatic storytelling: a beautiful stunt of a movie. It was shot over a period of 12 years, beginning in 2002, and it takes two hours and 40 minutes to tell the story of a boy named Mason as he grows up in Texas. The hook of the movie — and if it is a stunt, it’s a visionary one — is that Mason is played throughout by a young actor named Ellar Coltrane, who we literally watch grow up, year after year, on camera. That makes the film a kind of cousin to Michael Apted’s series of Up documentaries, but I’m not sure if this sort of thing has ever been attempted in a work of cinematic fiction before.

Linklater, of course, is a storyteller who reveres the art of naturalism, and Boyhood, though it’s a genuine movie, full of bustlingly staged scenes and performances and motifs and arcs, has the feel of a staged documentary about a fictional character. It’s lively and boisterous and very entertaining to watch, because stuff keeps happening, but the film also rolls forward in an almost Zen manner, so that everything that occurs — an angry family dinner, a camping trip, a haircut, an afternoon of videogames — carries the same wide-eyed, you are here significance. The film has that deadpan Linklater tone of slacker haphazardness, but you could also say that it’s almost Joycean in its appreciation of the scruffy magic of everyday life. READ FULL STORY

Road to Sundance: 'Before Midnight' brings sequels to Sundance -- VIDEO

Every Monday until the 2014 Sundance Film Festival, EW is celebrating a great success story from independent film’s most prestigious showcase. So far, we’ve revisited Lee Daniel’s Precious, Courtney Hunt’s Frozen River, Greg Mottola’s Adventureland, Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s Don Jon, and Ryan Coogler’s Fruitvale Station. Today, we look back at Before Midnight, the much-anticipated 2013 sequel from Richard Linklater.

Sundance and sequels don’t typically go hand-in-hand. But Before Midnight, the third film in Richard Linklater’s accidental trilogy about the ongoing romance between Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Celine (Julie Delpy), felt right at home when it debuted at the festival last year. The original 1995 movie, Before Sunrise, was a studio film that became beloved despite barely making a blip at the box office, and the latest installment was completely independent.

When Before Midnight debuted last January, fans were obsessed to see where the couple would be nine years after Before Sunset, the Paris-set sequel that left fans hanging on whether Jesse would catch his plane back to New York or start a new life with the “one that got away.” That film earned won the trio an Oscar nod for screenplay, and the three collaborated again on Midnight, which finds the couple together, with kids, in Greece.

Critics and fans adored the latest film, which featured combative marital scenes that were raw and honest. (Who hasn’t wanted to call one’s spouse the mayor of Crazytown?) The romance was still there, but it was no longer an ideal or a wish. It was real and grounded, evolved and maturing along with its characters.

Click below to see the trio at last year’s Sundance, discussing the movie and the future of their “franchise.” READ FULL STORY

Richard Linklater's 'Boyhood' to premiere at Sundance

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Richard Linklater is no stranger to daunting projects (look no further than Before Midnight and its beloved predecessors). But his newest film, Boyhood, may be his most ambitious yet. Starring  Patricia Arquette, Ellar Coltrane, Lorelei Linklater and Ethan Hawke, the new film, written by Linklater as well, will have a special preview screening Jan. 19 at Sundance, the festival announced today.

“[Boyhood is] also known as The Twelve Year Project,” Hawke said in a chat last year. “Richard Linklater and I have made a short film every year for the last 11 years, one more to go, that follows the development of a young boy from age 6 to 18. I play the father, and it’s Tolstoy-esque in scope. I thought the Before series was the most unique thing I would ever be a part of, but Rick has engaged me in something even more strange. Doing a scene with a young boy at the age of 7 when he talks about why do raccoons die, and at the age of 12 when he talks about video games, and 17 when he asks me about girls, and have it be the same actor — to watch his voice and body morph — it’s a little bit like timelapse photography of a human being.”

With the addition of Boyhood, the 2014 Sundance Film Festival in Utah will present 121 feature-length films, including 35 in competition. The festival takes place January 16-26.

Casting Net: 'Breaking Bad' actor Jesse Plemons auditioning for 'Star Wars: Episode VII'; Plus, Cote De Pablo, more

Breaking Bad and Friday Night Lights alum Jesse Plemons is the latest name to emerge in the Star Wars: Episode VII casting rumor mill. According to The Wrap, Plemons is flying to Los Angeles to audition for director J.J. Abrams for the highly secretive Disney/Lucasfilm project, which is scheduled for a Dec. 18, 2015, release. Franchise originals Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher, and Mark Hamill are all expected to return, but the cast still remains a mystery. Other recent rumors have included Chiwetel Ejiofor, Benedict Cumberbatch, and Sullivan Stapleton. [The Wrap]
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