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Tag: EW Exclusive (21-30 of 776)

See the poster for Anne Hathaway's 'Song One'

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In Song One, Anne Hathaway plays Franny, an academic whose research in North Africa is cut short by an emergency phone call from home: her younger brother Henry has been hit by a car and is in a coma.

Henry was an aspiring Brooklyn musician, a career development that had soured the siblings’ relationship. But as she and her mother (Mary Steenburgen) reconnect around his hospital bed, she also gains a greater appreciation for her brother’s commitment to music from the songs he left behind. She visits the clubs he frequented, and when the opportunity presents itself, she approaches her brother’s favorite singer, James Forrester (Johnny Flynn), with a recording of one of her brother’s songs.

Serene and guarded, James is suffering in his own way. A wave of early success has left him paralyzed creatively, but his connection with Franny and her family sparks a healing relationship for both of them.

Flynn was cast perfectly as James, a folksy musician from England who’s a star in Brooklyn’s hip rock-folk scene. Flynn has released four albums, including Country Mile in 2013, and he’d already performed in Brooklyn clubs like Pete’s Candy Store before ever being cast in Song One. “When I read the script, I was like, ‘Oh, in some ways, this is almost my experience of New York,'” says Flynn.

The film is written and directed by Kate Barker-Froyland, who met Hathaway on the set of The Devil Wears Prada, where she was director David Frankel’s assistant. Song One debuted at the Sundance Film Festival and is the first film Hathaway has produced with her husband, Adam Shulman. Film Arcade is releasing the film in theaters and on-demand on Jan. 23. READ FULL STORY

See which Hollywood star is coming to Pixie Hollow in the trailer for the Tinker Bell movie

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Pop-culture seems covered in J.M. Barrie’s fairy dust right now, what with NBC’s live stage-musical of Peter Pan scheduled for Dec. 4. Fans of Disney’s Tinker Bell series can also mark their calendars on March 3, when the seventh Tink film—Tinker Bell and the Legend of the NeverBeast—arrives on DVD and Blu-ray. In the latest animated adventure, the peace and calm of Pixie Hollow are disrupted by a mysterious beast that strikes fear in the hearts of some of the fairies—but not Fawn, the brave and sweet animal-lover who looks past the NeverBeast’s frightening exterior.

In the exclusive new trailer, see the razor-toothed creature that has Pixie Hollow on edge. And meet Nyx, the scout fairy determined to protect her friends from any and all dangerous threats. READ FULL STORY

'Mean Girls' reunion: Could there be a sequel -- and which stars would be up for it?

It’s been a decade since Mean Girls was released, but affection for the film only seems to get stronger with each passing year. Tina Fey has already announced that a stage musical is in development—but could the Plastics ever team up for another big-screen outing? (Paramount did release a straight-to-DVD sequel in 2011.)

For our Reunions issue, on stands now, EW asked each actress—as well as Fey—whether they’d want to revisit the Girls. READ FULL STORY

'Birdman' exclusive: Look behind the curtain of the 'play within the play'

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“I too am not a bit tamed—I too am untranslatable; I sound my barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world.” —Walt Whitman

Michael Keaton isn’t mid-sneeze in the photo above from Birdman. Actually, he’s executing the fierce war cry of Birdman, the iconic movie superhero who his character, Riggan Thomson, was famous for—before walking away from the role after Birdman III 20 years ago. In the new film, directed by Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Riggan has bet everything he has on adapting, directing, and starring in a Broadway play based on Raymond Carver’s What We Talk About When We Talk About Love. He too wants to make one final barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world, to prove his worth, not only to critics and his daughter, but himself. READ FULL STORY

EW's 'Fabulous Baker Boys' reunion: The stars all sing a different tune

Truth is like a good jazz standard: a different version emerges from everyone who sings it. When you start reminiscing with the stars of The Fabulous Baker Boys 25 years later, a kind of three-part harmony emerges. Everyone hits a different note, but somehow they’re still in sync. “We get all mixed up. We have different versions,” Jeff Bridges says. “But when we talk, we hash it out.”

In Entertainment Weekly‘s annual reunions issue, we bring together Jeff, his big brother, Beau, and Michelle Pfeiffer, who plays the torch singer who both energizes and threatens to destroy their piano-dueling partnership. The 1989 film, which earned four Oscar nominations, is the only time this trio teamed up on film.

After a quarter century, their memories are a little fuzzy—although everyone is sure his or her version is the correct one. READ FULL STORY

EW's 'Mean Girls' reunion: The cast looks back on the 2004 hit

One sure sign of a film’s legacy: Does it inspire its own holiday?

If you happened to be anywhere near the Internet on Oct. 3, you probably noticed an outpouring of nostalgia for 2004’s Mean Girls. The reason? A throwaway line uttered by Lindsay Lohan’s Cady: “It’s October 3rd.”

That may seem a pretty slim thread to hang an entire day on, but it’s indicative of the fervent fan base for this new-classic teen comedy. Written by Tina Fey and directed by Mark Waters (Vampire Academy), Mean Girls stars Lohan as a high school student at a new school who infiltrates the Plastics, a group of nasty popular girls led by queen bee Regina (Rachel McAdams) and her underlings: insecure Gretchen (Lacey Chabert) and dumb-as-a-stump Karen (Amanda Seyfried). The film became a surprise sleeper hit, earning $129 million worldwide and gaining an even bigger following on DVD. In the decade since, Mean Girls has joined Clueless and Sixteen Candles in the teen-comedy canon.

For its 10th anniversary, EW invited the film’s female leads to our own little pep rally, where they talked about their memories, behind-the-scenes magic, and what they think their characters would be doing now. READ FULL STORY

'Beyond the Lights': Watch Gugu Mbatha-Raw transform into a pop star

In Beyond the Lights, Gugu Mbatha-Raw (Belle) plays Noni, a young singer thrust into the music-industry pressure cooker—one that seems to transform female performers into hypersexualized commodities. Writer-director Gina Prince-Bythewood (Love & Basketball) came up with the idea after noticing that her favorite genre, hip-hop/R&B, had lost its edgy playfulness, becoming more of a dark force that, in her opinion, objectifies women. “It’s moving into an ugly, angry place,” she says.

Before she could comment on the genre, she had to first create her own pop star. And she did so with help from the pros, including Lady Gaga’s choreographer LaurieAnn Gibson and Beyonce’s hairdresser Kim Kimble. The goal was to meld Beyonce’s swagger with Rihanna’s edge and Rita Ora’s playfulness, making a star all her own. READ FULL STORY

First look: Kurt Russell saddles up in 'Bone Tomahawk'

The last time Kurt Russell signed on to appear in a Western the result was 1993’s Tombstone, a film which over time has acquired the reputation as a bona fide classic of the genre as well as one of the movies most quoted whenever poker players get together. (“I’m your huckleberry.”) So it’s hard not to get pretty rootin’-tootin’ excited about the news that, 21 years on, the Escape from New York star has once again saddled up for the just-wrapped Western, Bone Tomahawk.

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'Showrunners' doc: What happens when tempers flare on hit TV shows

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In movies, if the cast and filmmaker don’t get along, at least there’s an end date. Television is a different story — specifically, it’s a long form story. Discord on set can last for years if you’re not careful.

So how do you solve that trouble once it starts? That’s one question explored in the new documentary Showrunners: The Art of Running a TV Show – which debuts today in limited release and is also available on demand. The film, directed by Des Doyle, takes fans behind the scenes of hit TV shows such as Sons of Anarchy, Boardwalk Empire, The Big Bang Theory and The Good Wife, putting their creators (and their headaches) in the spotlight.

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'The Babadook' director talks old-school horror

Horror directors these days seem to almost automatically genuflect before the altars of such ’70s and ’80s filmmakers as John Carpenter and Dario Argento. But writer-director Jennifer Kent sought inspiration from much older auteurs while crafting her debut film, the much-acclaimed, Sundance-screened, The Babadook. “I’ve watched everything, from Mario Bava to Dario Argento—all of those ‘70s guys, including John Carpenter, who I love,” she says. “But I feel very drawn also to the early stuff. There were directors in the ’20s and ’30s—Carl Dreyer, Fritz Lang—who were making films that were art and they just happened to be terrifying. I think somewhere along the way we denigrated the art form and horror really has become a dirty word. I think that’s a shame, because it’s really cinematic.”

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