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Tag: EW Exclusive (61-70 of 761)

See the first clip of Samuel L. Jackson in TIFF feature 'Big Game'

big-game

Finnish writer and director Jalmari Helander made a big splash with 2010′s Rare Exports, the tale of a giant, monstrous Santa Claus. How do you follow that? The answer arrives at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival in the form of Big Game, which makes its world premiere at the event tomorrow night when it kicks off TIFF’s Midnight Madness strand.

Samuel L. Jackson stars in the film as an American president who, following an attack on Air Force One, is pursued through the Scandinavian wilderness by a band of killers. The only person who can help him survive: a 13-year-old boy, played by Rare Exports actor Onni Tommila.

Big Game costars Ray Stevenson, Ted Levine, Felicity Huffman, Victor Garber, Jorma Tommila, Mehmet Kurtulus, and the always watchable Jim Broadbent. Watch Jackson and Onni Tommila in the exclusive first clip from the film below. READ FULL STORY

Can indie cartoon 'Hullabaloo' give new steam to hand-drawn animation? -- EXCLUSIVE Q&A

hullabaloo

Hand-drawn animation needs a hero, and the latest project to champion the technique is an upstart steampunk adventure  overseen by a group of veteran Disney and DreamWorks artists.

Hullabaloo is the Victorian era sci-fi story of Veronica Daring, a young scientist who goes on a quest to find her kidnapped inventor father. The title refers not just to the ruckus she causes, but is the codename for her secret, crime-fighting identity.

To complete her mission, Hullabaloo’s going to need friends, cunning, intelligence, and – in the real world, at least – some money. That’s where Indiegogo comes in with a fundraising campaign by creator James Lopez to raise $80,000 to produce a proof-of-concept short.

The dream: a full-length, hand-drawn feature film — something none of the major film studios plan to make in the foreseeable future.

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See the poster for VICE skateboarding doc 'All This Mayhem'

ALL-THIS-MAYHEM

If the story of skateboarding siblings Tas and Ben Pappas were an attempted trick jump, it would feature a remarkable ascent and a horrible, deadly landing.

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Shlocky charms: The crazy rise and 'terrifying' return of 'Leprechaun'

How did a low budget horror movie about a diminutive Irish monster spawn five sequels, a new reboot, and the career of Jennifer Aniston? EW tracks the deranged history of the Leprechaun franchise.

British actor Warwick Davis says he has “specific” fans—well-wishers who want to discuss just one of the several fantasy franchises in which he has appeared. “People talk about Star Wars, people talk about Harry Potter,” he explains, “and people talk about Leprechaun.

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Richard Attenborough and Steven Spielberg: When 'E.T.' met 'Gandhi,' we got dinosaurs

To those who know their whole history, it may seem surprising that there was never any bad blood between Steven Spielberg and the late Richard Attenborough — unless you want to count the prehistoric kind drawn from those amber-encased mosquitos in Jurassic Park, the one big project they made together.

The two filmmakers, separated in age by more than a generation, were rivals who became collaborators and eventually friends. When Attenborough died at age 90 on Sunday, he left behind a legacy as an actor, director, and philanthropist – but the story of his relationship with Spielberg is evidence of another defining trait: gentleman.

Their complicated camaraderie began after the pair crossed paths at the most critical point in each of their careers — 1982, when Attenborough finally completed his 20-year quest to make the biographical drama Gandhi, and Spielberg finished a deeply personal film that stands as one of the best movies ever made about families: E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial.

Those two films couldn’t have been more different, but were destined for eternal comparison after becoming competitors at the 55th Academy Awards.

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Zen and the art of casting Bill Murray in your movie

“You know what the truth is? You don’t find Bill Murray,” filmmaker Theodore Melfi says. “Bill ­Murray finds you.”

This fateful lesson is one learned by many directors, though not all succeed in the quest to recruit the Ghostbusters and Rushmore star for their projects.

Melfi, a longtime commercial director making his feature writing and directing debutwas certain Murray would be perfect for the title role in St. Vincent, his indie comedy about a rotten, miserable old man who reluctantly discovers he’s not so rotten and miserable after all.

“He finds everything he’s supposed to be involved in by not chasing anything,” Melfi says. “If it’s supposed to happen, the person will hound him until it happens, or he’ll run into them at a bar or restaurant. He has a zen-like protocol in regard to what he does and doesn’t do.”

Here’s how the odd journey to St. Vincent played out, in three acts.

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Why the cast of 'Fury' got in fistfights every day on set

Most directors do their best to prevent actors punching each other. But during last year’s U.K. shoot for the World War II tank movie Fury, filmmaker David Ayer had his five principals—Brad Pitt, Logan Lerman, Shia Labeouf, Jon Bernthal, and Michael Peña—start the day by engaging in fisticuffs.

“We put them through martial arts training and physical combat classes,” says Ayer, whose film is released Oct. 17. “It’s a great ice breaker for actors. There’s something very honest about being punched in the face.”

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There's monster mayhem in the poster for 'Exists'

EXISTS

What is it that “exists” in Eduardo Sánchez‘s new horror film, Exists? Well, judging by the poster for the Blair Witch Project co-director’s movie—which you can exclusively see above—it ain’t the Easter Bunny.

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Eddie Redmayne on playing (and meeting) Stephen Hawking

Les Misérables star Eddie Redmayne plays Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything, a film that tracks the famed theoretical physicist’s relationship with his first wife, Jane (Felicity Jones), and the struggle they faced after he was diagnosed with the crippling degenerative illness ALS (also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease). “At age 21, he was a vibrant, funny young man, and he fell deeply in love with this woman,” Redmayne says. “Our film is about how they defied all the odds.”

To prepare for the film, which is released Nov. 7, the actor met with Hawking himself. “Even now, when he’s unable to move, you can still see such effervescence in his eyes,” he says.

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'We went in fearlessly': Stephen King on adapting 'A Good Marriage' for film

good-marriage-poster

What would you do if you found out a beloved family member was responsible for an unspeakable series of crimes? That’s the hook of the director Peter Askin’s new horror-thriller A Good Marriage, an adaptation of the Stephen King novella, which arrives in cinemas and on VOD Oct. 3.

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