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Tag: Gone Girl (1-10 of 32)

Box office update: 'Fury' takes in nearly $9 million Friday

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Brad Pitt’s World War II tank thriller Fury blew away the competition in its Friday debut, racking up $8.8 million at the box office and handily ending Gone Girl’s two-week run as the No. 1 movie in the country. The animated kids’ flick The Book of Life, meanwhile, showed a strong pulse in its first day in wide release, tallying $4.9 million. And the adaptation of Nicholas Sparks’ romantic tearjerker The Best of Me opened to a lackluster $4.1 million Friday, on track to come up short of pre-release expectations for its opening weekend. READ FULL STORY

Box office report: 'Dracula Untold' can't suck the blood out of 'Gone Girl'

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Despite an impressive showing, Dracula was no match for Amazing Amy, even in her second weekend in theaters. David Fincher’s adaptation of Gone Girl took the top spot again, only falling 30 percent from its debut weekend, with an estimated $26.8 million. The Fox pic, which cost around $61 million to produce, has grossed $78.3 million domestically so far and looks poised to go on to be Fincher’s highest earner (The Curious Case of Benjamin Button holds the current title with $127.5 million).

Universal’s Dracula Untold, an origin story of the classic character starring Luke Evans, opened in second place with $23.5 from 2,887 theaters, including IMAX ($4 million from 351 screens) and large format screens. The PG-13 rated fantasy cost around $70 million to produce and has already made $62.6 million from 42 territories internationally. Audiences, which were 57 percent male and 39 percent under age 25, seemed to enjoy the dark tale, too, giving it an A- CinemaScore. “It’s better than anyone expected in the industry. With exit polls as strong as they were, it’s promising,” says Universal’s president of domestic distribution Nikki Rocco. “We’re very pleased with the result.”

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Box office update: 'Dracula Untold' leads, 'Gone Girl' close No. 2

Amazing Amy has a new foe to reckon with this weekend. Universal and Legendary’s Dracula Untold (Cinema Score: A-) edged out Gone Girl for the No. 1 spot, Friday. Starring Luke Evans as the classic bloodsucker, Dracula Untold took in around $8.9 million, Friday (including Thursday showings), while David Fincher’s Gone Girl earned an estimated $8.15 million. It could be a tight race to No. 1, but tracking suggests that Gone Girl may end up the victor with $26 or $27 million this weekend and a $3 million lead over Dracula.

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Box office preview: 'Gone Girl' gets some fresh competition

Robert Downey Jr., Dracula, and a cute, unlucky family have all come out to challenge Gone Girl and Annabelle‘s box office reign this weekend.

David Fincher’s popular psychological thriller could hold down the top spot for the second weekend in a row, with that demon doll close behind, but it’s going to be a tight race with The Judge, Dracula Untold, and Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. The adultery thriller Addicted also opens in around 800 locations, and there’s a slew of great limited release choices debuting too, including the buzzy Sundance sensation Whiplash.

Here’s how things might play out.

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Sample the 'Amazing Amy' books of 'Gone Girl'

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Amy Dunne of Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl always had to live her life in the shadow of another Amy—Amazing Amy, the star of children’s books written by her parents. READ FULL STORY

Box office report: 'Gone Girl', 'Annabelle' shatter expectations

Gone Girl and Annabelle ruled the box office this weekend with stunning debuts. David Fincher’s critically adored adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s bestseller earned an estimated $38 million from 3,014 screens for Fox (a career high for Fincher), while Warner Bros./New Line’s Annabelle, a spinoff of last year’s horror hit The Conjuring, took in an impressive $37.2 million from 3,185 screens. Studios and analysts had expected both to open in the mid $20 million range.

It’s striking that both were slapped with underwhelming B CinemaScores, suggesting that, though audiences turned out in droves for both R-rated pics, neither really lived up to expectations. Also, while the weekend earnings are quite similar, and could very well shift slightly by the time Monday actuals come in, these are two very different kinds of successes.

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From 'Psycho' to 'Gone Girl': the best director/composer teams

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With this weekend’s release of Gone Girl, director David Fincher has once again showcased the unsettling sounds of award-winning composers Atticus Ross and Trent Reznor (above). Ever since 2010’s The Social Network, the duo have become a fixture of Fincher’s work. The duo’s deceptively minimal sound, with subtle motifs barely hiding cold electronic undercurrents, is remarkably well-suited for Fincher’s trademark visual aesthetic, in which every smile and doorway can take on an air of menace if the camera lingers long enough. While he has worked with a number of composers before—most notably Howard Shore—Fincher has found a sonic soulmate in Ross and Reznor’s scoring.

But what about the other great director/composer relationships in Hollywood history? What other composers have had their music strongly associated with a director’s work, so much so that you can’t picture a film without hearing the score?  READ FULL STORY

Box office update: 'Annabelle' sneaks ahead of 'Gone Girl'

Annabelle and Gone Girl will exceed expectations as both head for a possible $30+ million showing this weekend.

Though that terrifying doll from The Conjuring took first place on Friday with an estimated $15.5 million, it’s likely that David Fincher’s well-regarded adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s bestseller will inch ahead when the weekend totals are tallied. Poorly reviewed horror movies do not age well, even across a single weekend. Interestingly, audiences gave both Annabelle and Gone Girl a B CinemaScore, suggesting that neither lived up to their expectations.

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Critical Mass: Does David Fincher deliver the chills of 'Gone Girl' to the screen?

“Marriage is hard work,” says Amy Dunne in Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl.

The longer one has been married, the greater one understands the meaning behind the phrase “honeymoon period.” In David Fincher’s adaptation of Flynn’s bestseller, the magical romance between Nick (Ben Affleck) and Amy Dunne (Rosamund Pike) has hit the wall five years in. They fall in love in New York City, but when they both lose their magazine jobs and his mother falls ill in Missouri, they move to his hometown and quickly drift apart. How far apart? Nick may have murdered her.

When Amy goes missing on the day of the fifth anniversary, Nick is the primary suspect. The local cops can’t believe all the evidence against him, and any sympathy he initially gets from the news media vanishes once some of his secrets come to light.

Flynn, who also wrote the screenplay, worked hard to translate the he-said/she-said storytelling, and Fincher wrings the most out of the film’s twists and turns—even though millions of readers already know when to expect them. “I can’t guarantee that the film’s ending will work for everyone (it was always my one nit to pick with Flynn’s novel),” writes EW‘s Chris Nashawaty. “But I will say this: Anyone who loved Gone Girl the book will walk out of Gone Girl the movie with a sick grin on their face.”

Read more from EW’s review, as well as a roundup of other notable critics, below. READ FULL STORY

Who's that 'Gone Girl'? A chat with Rosamund Pike

Everyone who read Gillian Flynn’s runaway 2012 bestseller Gone Girl quickly had a vision of Amy Dunne in their head. Hollywood was no different: The beautiful blonde who’d been the model for her parents’ popular children’s books, Amazing Amy, who disappeared on the morning of her fifth wedding anniversary, leading to a media frenzy that focused suspicions of foul play on her husband, Nick, could’ve been Reese Witherspoon or Charlize Theron or Emily Blunt. Chances are you didn’t immediately picture Rosamund Pike.

But when the lights come on in the theater after David Fincher’s Gone Girl, don’t expect to hear much second-guessing. Instead, expect some version of, “Who. Was. That?”

Pike so perfectly taps into Flynn’s complex main character, who narrates much of the film, that it’s suddenly difficult to imagine anyone else. And while Pike has been acting in major Hollywood films for more than a decade, Gone Girl might be the first time many casual moviegoers connect the name with a face. Then, working backwards, some may remember her from Jack Reacher, from her role as a vacant party girl in An Education, from playing Ryan Gosling’s new boss in Fracture, from her beautiful reserve as the eldest Bennet daughter in Pride & Prejudice, and from her big-screen debut as a 22-year old in Pierce Brosnan’s last James Bond film, Die Another Day. Clearly, Pike is hardly some overnight success.

“Rosamund was someone that I had seen in four or five different movies over 10 years, and I never got a bead on her,” Fincher said at the New York Film Festival premiere. “I never got a sense of who she was. And I pride myself on being able to watch actors and sort of know instinctively what their utility belt is, and I don’t have that with Rosamund. I didn’t know what she was building off of. There was an opacity there and it was interesting.”

The only child of two British opera singers, Pike graduated from Oxford and acted in theater before segueing into British television, where she was spotted by Bond producers and cast as a Bond Girl named Miranda Frost. (You might remember her fight scene with Halle Berry.) She’s never stopped working, but Fincher was the first major filmmaker to entrust her with a leading role in a big Hollywood production.

With Oscar buzzing growing, Pike might now be elevated to that top rung of actresses whose names will be bandied about the next time a great literary female character is adapted to the screen. She’s already booked her next big project, however, and it’s not a film. She’s expecting her second child with husband Robie Uniacke this November.

Pike spoke to EW about her career, playing Amy Dunne, and the experience of working with David Fincher. READ FULL STORY

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