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Tag: Inside Llewyn Davis (1-10 of 20)

Box office report: 'Lone Survivor' sizzles with $38.5 million and rare A+ CinemaScore

Pete Berg’s gritty combat drama Lone Survivor accomplished its mission at the box office this weekend. The film, based on the true story of former Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell, grossed $38.5 million over the Friday-to-Sunday period, marking the second best January debut of all time after Cloverfield‘s $40.1 million bow in 2008. Audiences, which were 57 percent male and 57 percent 30 or older, issued Lone Survivor a rare “A+” CinemaScore grade, suggesting that Universal’s $40 million film will benefit from terrific word-of-mouth in the weeks to come.

Lone Survivor‘s success marks a major comeback for director Berg, whose last film, Battleship, opened to just $25 million against a whopping $209 million budget. Like that film, Lone also stars Friday Night Lights‘ Taylor Kitsch, though it was marketed primarily on the star power of its leading man, Mark Wahlberg. The Boston-born star has grown into a reliable box office draw, so its doubly impressive that Lone Survivor is one of his best-ever opening weekend results, trailing only 2012’s Ted, which started with $54.4 million. The film is a major win for all parties involved. READ FULL STORY

Box office preview: 'Lone Survivor' set to SEAL an easy victory

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Two testosterone-fueled action pics will flex their muscles at the box office this weekend, but only one will win in this arm wrestling contest. Navy SEAL tale Lone Survivor is poised to become the year’s first breakout hit, while the Kellan Lutz vehicle The Legend of Hercules is set to become its first true bomb. Three Oscar contenders — August: Osage County, Inside Llewyn Davis, and Her — are all getting nationwide expansions as well. Here’s how the frame may play out:

1. Lone Survivor – $27 million
Mark Wahlberg has become a reliable box office draw in recent years, driving films like Contraband and 2 Guns to solid openings in the mid-$20 million range. The star’s new war film, based on the hugely popular book by former SEAL Marcus Luttrell, should have no trouble topping the box office in its first outing in wide release. Universal has played up Luttrell’s involvement in the film, showcasing it as a patriotic endeavor that re-creates the real story of the disastrous 2005 Afghanistan mission Operation Red Wings, which left only Luttrell alive.

Lone Survivor could play much like the last real-SEAL movie to storm the box office, Act of Valor, which opened with $24.5 million in 2012 en route to a $70 million total. Tracking for Lone Survivor, which cost Universal $40 million, is solid, and it should play very well in the heartland of America. Fandango reports that the Pete Berg-directed film accounts for 51 percent of all ticket sales heading into this weekend, and in over 2,700 theaters, Lone Survivor may pull in a strong $27 million — primarily from its core demographic of young men. READ FULL STORY

'Inside Llewyn Davis' honored by the National Society of Film Critics

The Coens’ film about failure continues to experience little of it. The National Society of Film Critics handed out their awards on Saturday and Inside Llewyn Davis, Joel and Ethan Coen’s soulful and sardonic journey set among the Greenwich Village folk music set, came away with a number of top prizes, including Best Picture, Director, and Actor. Also honored were Cate Blanchett for Blue Jasmine, James Franco for Spring Breakers, and Jennifer Lawrence for American Hustle. Check out the full list of winners and runners-up below, including the voting breakdown. READ FULL STORY

From 'Hustle' to 'Mr. Banks,' this season's movies hit musical highs

When you think of the movies you really love, your memories of a great many of them are probably linked, in one way or another, to music. Yet movies and music remain, at least in our heads, beautifully complimentary yet distinct things, like food and wine, or football and big TVs. They shouldn’t, though. A musical, of course, is its own special mashup. Yet there are so many other incredible ways that movies and music can merge. The title sequence of Singin’ in the Rain is a great number — and so, in its way, is Ewan McGregor’s performance of “Your Song” in Moulin Rouge! Yet what about the opening-credits sequence of American Hustle? We hear Steely Dan’s great 1972 song “Dirty Work” laid over slow-motion images of Christian Bale, Bradley Cooper, and Amy Adams sauntering through the Plaza Hotel with a suspicious-looking briefcase. The song is reconfigured, with an irony that gently explodes in your brain, from being about an adulterous lover tired of being used as a slimy third wheel into a song about a con man tired of being used by the law. More that just a terrific song choice, this, too, is a bona fide musical number — a piece of opera, really. And it’s just one of many moments in American Hustle that remind you why movies and music, when they’re really working together, chemically and synergistically, create a sensual pop poetry all their own. Here’s a look at a few of the other memorable numbers unfolding in the big-screen operas-by-any-other-name that are ruling the megaplex this season. READ FULL STORY

'Inside Llewyn Davis' charms Toronto critics

The Coen brothers latest movie was sweet music to the ears of the Toronto Film Critics Association. Inside Llewyn Davis and its star, Oscar Isaac, were named Best Picture and Best Actor respectively, and the sibling filmmakers were mentioned as runners-up for Best Director and Best Screenplay. Alfonso Cuarón won Best Director for Gravity, and Spike Jonze won the screenwriting award for Her.

In the other major acting categories, Oscar frontunners Cate Blanchett (Blue Jasmine), Jared Leto (Dallas Buyers Club), and Jennifer Lawrence (American Hustle) won.

Hayao Miyazaki’s animated biopic The Wind Rises won for Best Animated Feature, and Neighboring Sounds was named Best First Feature edging Fruitvale Station and Lake Bell’s In a World….

The Toronto critics have a contrarian bent, and are not relied on to necessarily forecast the Oscars. In recent years, they’ve honored The Master, The Tree of Life, Hunger, and Wendy and Lucy for Best Picture.

Click below for a complete list of winners. READ FULL STORY

Golden Globes: 'Inside Llewyn Davis' star Oscar Isaac on his nomination and general distaste for cats

This morning, Oscar Isaac scored a Best Actor in a Motion Picture (Comedy or Musical) nomination for his breakout role in Inside Llewyn Davis. We caught up with the star to get his reaction:

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Congrats on the nomination! That must feel great. But does having to do hours of interviews at the crack of dawn put a damper on things?
OSCAR ISAAC: [Laughs] A little bit. My family is like, “What the crap, man? Answer your phone!”

If you decide to indulge yourself and celebrate, what will you do?
I guess do some drinking. I’ve been trying to stay away from it because you need the energy, but I might have to have a celebratory champagne. I do love streaking, so I’m kind of fighting the urge to streak in the airplane up and down the aisle. I’ll let you know as I get into this champagne. READ FULL STORY

AFI movies of the year: 'Her' and '12 Years a Slave' in; 'August: Osage County' out

The American Film Institute announced its 10 “most outstanding” movies of the year Monday, including Her, 12 Years a Slave, American Hustle, Gravity, and The Wolf of Wall Street.

AFI has a strong history of selecting films that end up competing for an Academy Award. Last year alone, all but Moonrise Kingdom and The Dark Knight Rises picked up Best Picture nominations. The only nominee AFI missed was Amour, and that’s just because AFI only selects from American films. Not too shabby.

The list is mostly consistent with the landscape of serious contenders that we’ve been anticipating. The recently announced critics awards largely skewed toward 12 Years a Slave, with a few nods for American Hustle, Gravity, and Her – all of which are represented on AFI’s list. Notably, Sundance winner Fruitvale Station (largely absent from critics lists) made the top 10, perhaps signifying that it’s not out of the race just yet. Missing from AFI’s list are a few notable Best Picture hopefuls including Philomena, August: Osage County, and Blue Jasmine.

Check out the full list below, including AFI’s television programs of the year.
READ FULL STORY

Los Angeles Film Critics Awards: 'Gravity' ties with 'Her' for Best Picture, James Franco ties with Jared Leto

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The Los Angeles Film Critics Association named ties in three major categories Sunday. Gravity tied with Her for Best Picture, James Franco and Jared Leto tied for Best Supporting Actor for their performances in Spring Breakers and Dallas Buyers Club, and Cate Blanchett and Adèle Exarchopoulos tied for Best Actress for their work in Blue Jasmine and Blue is the Warmest Color.

The LAFCA did choose distinct winners in the other major acting categories. Bruce Dern was named Best Actor for his portrayal of Woody Grant in Nebraska, and Lupita Nyong’o picked up a supporting actress win for playing the tragic Patsey in 12 Years a Slave.

Gravity was the big winner beyond its Best Picture tie with Spike Jonze’s Her, walking away with nods for Best Director, Best Editing, and Best Cinematography. Also of note, Sarah Polley’s Stories We Tellrecently selected as one of the 15 docs on the Academy’s shortlist — won Best Documentary.

Noticeably absent from any recognition was David O. Russell’s American Hustle, which the New York Film Critics Circle named Best Picture; Sundance favorite and recent Gotham Awards-winner Fruitvale Station; and the Robert Redford survival pic All Is Lost.

Check out the full list of winners below.

READ FULL STORY

Box office report: 'Frozen' rises to No. 1 with $31.6 million, leaves no heat for 'Out of the Furnace'

The first weekend in December is a notoriously weak one at the box office, and, true to form, most movies faced harsh declines this weekend after the record-breaking Thanksgiving frame. But Disney’s animated musical Frozen managed to score a not-so-severe 53 percent fall to $31.6 million this weekend, which sent it past Catching Fire and straight into the No. 1 spot on the chart.

Frozen has earned $134.3 million after 12 days in wide release, 39 percent more than 2010’s Tangled, which had earned $96.6 million at the same point in its run. The film will match its $150 million budget by this time next week, and if it maintains its current pace (which seems likely given its “A+” CinemaScore), Frozen could be headed for a finish of about $280 million. The film’s box office success is sending its soundtrack into the upper echelons of the music charts. The soundtrack debuted at No. 18 on the Billboard 200 last week, and it’s risen all the way to No. 4 on the iTunes chart as well. READ FULL STORY

Box office update: 'Catching Fire' tops Friday with $7.7 million, but 'Frozen' may take the weekend

Even on a relatively quiet day at the box office, The Hunger Games: Catching Fire is still red-hot. After earning a record-breaking gross over the Thanksgiving frame, the sequel topped the chart yesterday, its third Friday, with $7.7 million. That sets the blockbuster up for a $27 million gross and about $337 million total through Sunday.

In second place, Disney’s animated musical Frozen grossed $6.8 million on its second Friday in wide release. While that number is slightly below expectations (I predicted a $34 million gross this weekend), family-friendly matinee showtimes on Saturday and Sunday should help Frozen hold up quite nicely over the rest of the frame. The film appears headed for a $28-29 million gross, which would let it surpass Catching Fire for the number one spot on the chart. Find out tomorrow where it lands. READ FULL STORY

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