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Tag: Jason Reitman (11-20 of 40)

Toronto 2013: Alfonso Cuaron's hypnotic 'Gravity' is the space odyssey as head trip

A paradox of watching special-effects films in the all-fantasy-all-the-time CGI era is that you can go to the movies every week, especially in the summer, and experience things that really ought to seem magical — a man of steel zipping through the air, an endless zombie army shimmying over a wall, cracks opening in the earth as the world ends — and as entertaining as much of this stuff is, none of it, at heart, leaves you truly, deeply amazed, because eye-popping visual miracles have become so routine that they’re simply the new normal. (How far we’ve evolved from the days of “You’ll believe a man can fly!”) But when you watch Gravity, a tale of floating astronauts starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney, set in what used to be called outer space (and now might be called 600 kilometers over the earth), you may find yourself thinking, over and over again, “How the heck did they do that?” It’s not because you’re seeing anything that’s all that outrageously fanciful. Gravity, though it’s set in space, isn’t really science fiction. It’s a drama built around the technology of space travel as it more or less exists today. What’s astonishing about the film is its hypnotic seamlessness — the way that the director, Alfonso Cuarón, using special effects (and 3D) with a nearly poetic simplicity and command, places us right up there in space along with the people on screen.

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Toronto: Pregnant Kate Winslet skips screening over 'Labor Day' pains

Jason Reitman made a touching and eloquent introduction to his new movie Labor Day in Toronto, the city that’s practically a second home for the Canadian-born director. Then the lights dimmed and the crowd buzzed in anticipation… but for two empty seats in the middle of Ryerson Theatre with placards reading “WINSLET.” Under the cloak of darkness, a young fan tried to sneak into the exclusive seats before being shamed away by an Oscar-winning director seated in the same reserved row. The pair of seats remained empty for the duration of the film.

Hollywood secret: the stars don’t always stay to watch their own premieres. Some have seen the movie before, others don’t care to watch themselves on screen — ever, and for many, their work was simply completed months earlier when the film wrapped. But Winslet’s absence was something more, a fact she revealed during an awkward exchange in the post-screening audience Q+A, in which the visibly pregnant Oscar-winning actress did participate. (Minor SPOILERS below.)

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'Labor Day': Kate Winslet and Josh Brolin sweat out tension in first clip from fugitive drama -- VIDEO


The escaped convict drama Labor Day has released its first clip, one day before playing at the Toronto International Film Festival tomorrow night.

Kate Winslet stars as a shut-in, emotionally fragile single mother who encounters Josh Brolin’s wounded fugitive while on a rare shopping trip with her young son (Gattlin Griffith.) The man needs a place to lay low, and she agrees — mostly out of fear, but also from a buried, hidden attraction.

This scene takes place shortly after the trio arrives at her home, and there’s a hidden message going on in the dialogue that will change the way you watch their interaction ….

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Jason Reitman recruiting Adam Sandler, Jennifer Garner, Rosemarie DeWitt for 'Men, Women & Children'

Adam Sandler may go heavy-duty again. The comedian is getting back into Punch-Drunk Love territory by joining with Jennifer Garner and Rosemarie DeWitt for Men, Women & Children, a darkly satiric film that director Jason Reitman is currently putting together.

The Up in the Air and Thank You For Smoking filmmaker has worked with Erin Cressida Wilson (Secretary, Chloe) to co-write an adaptation of the Chad Kultgen novel, about a group of families coming apart at the seams over sex, loyalty, ambition, and the isolation of an increasingly networked world.

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Telluride: Jason Reitman's new movie headlines 'Labor Day' weekend lineup

The 40th anniversary edition of the Telluride Film Festival unveiled its lineup, as per custom, just days in advance of its presentation in the mountains of Colorado. The five-day event begins tomorrow and will include several movies with Oscar ambitions, including the world premiere of Jason Reitman’s Labor Day, starring Kate Winslet and Josh Brolin.

The Coen brothers’ Inside Llewyn Davis (pictured above), Alexander Payne’s Nebraska, the Robert Redford movie All is Lost, and the erotic French film Blue is the Warmest Color, all of which premiered at Cannes in May, will make their American debuts at Telluride. In addition, Alfonso Cuarón’s Gravity and Errol’s Morris’ documentary on Donald Rumsfeld, The Unknown Known, will play at Telluride before their screenings at the Toronto Film Festival next week.

Telluride will likely add a surprise sneak preview or two before it wraps up on Monday. Last year, Ben Affleck unveiled Argo unannounced at the festival, winning raves that ultimately led to Oscar gold.

Click below for a complete list of the Telluride films. READ FULL STORY

'The Princess Bride': 10 INCONCEIVABLE facts from the Academy's live-commentary screening

“If you came tonight hoping to watch The Princess Bride completely uninterrupted, you really should just leave now.”

This was Up in the Air and Juno filmmaker Jason Reitman introducing last night’s live-commentary screening of the 1987 fairy-tale satire at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. As the film played out on the big screen, Reitman sat in the theater with director Rob Reiner interviewing him about the action onscreen.

“Tonight we’re trying an experiment,” Reitman told the crowd. “I thought there must be a way to take a film everyone has seen a million times, that we love, that occupies such a strong part of our hearts, and somehow get more access to what it was like actually making this film. That’s where this idea came from.”

Reiner started out by asking: “How many people here are under 30? Let me see. Raise your hand.” About a third of the moviegoers raised their hands. “Okay, so you are used to multitasking and not paying attention to anything anyway. This should be fine for you! You’ll watch, you’ll talk, you’ll text … You can play a video game. Whatever!”

“We’ll start watching the film and then, uh, see what comes out!”

Here’s what did:

1. At 60, Peter Falk thought he was too young

2. Hidden Spinal Tap easter egg

3. “As you wish” is a coded message

4. An unexpected fan: Mafia henchman

5. Robin Wright’s first day: Set on fire

6. The LEAST Sicilian Sicilian

7. Andre the Giant was fragile

8. The arsonist in the Fire Swamp

9. Buttercup was (briefly) played by a man

10. The ending that almost wasn’t

Roger Ebert's 71st birthday: Jason Reitman on the critic directors loved

Roger Ebert died on April 4 after a long battle with cancer. To commemorate what would have been his 71st birthday today, EW is republishing this essay by filmmaker Jason Reitman, written in tribute shortly after the critic’s passing.

I spoke with Roger Ebert perhaps a dozen times, but only heard his voice once. READ FULL STORY

'Whiplash': Sundance-winning short to become full-length feature -- BREAKING

The savage Sundance-winning short Whiplash, about a young drummer facing down a brutally antagonizing music instructor, is about to become a feature film.

Writer and director Damien Chazelle adapted the 18-minute short from several scenes in the full-length script with the hope that it would attract investors for the complete version.

Now Bold Films, the production company behind Drive and the upcoming Only God Forgives, has stepped forward to fill out the undisclosed budget. The company will make Whiplash as a joint production with Right of Way Films and Blumhouse Productions, who teamed up to create the short.

In the video above, EW debuted the first clip from Whiplash, which went on to win Sundance’s short film jury award for fiction.

The movie focuses on a drummer (Johnny Simmons) in an elite jazz orchestra conservatory as he struggles to impress a merciless teacher, played by J.K. Simmons (Juno and Spider-Man.)

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All-female cast for Jason Reitman's 'Glengarry Glen Ross' reading -- EXCLUSIVE

Glengarry-Glen-Ross-Grab

Just picture this image with a pantsuit. And some nail polish on that finger.

Oh, and Parenthood‘s Mae Whitman where Kevin Spacey is leaning.

Jason Reitman’s latest live stage-reading of an iconic movie script will replace the male dominated Glengarry Glen Ross with an entirely female cast, marking the biggest overall twist for one of his cinematic recreations since last year’s all black performance of Reservoir Dogs.

Entertainment Weekly has the exclusive details on who else will take on roles from the 1992 film, why he wanted to replace XY chromosomes with XX, and we’ll also give you a preview of the poster for the event. READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2013: Prize-winning 'Whiplash' short aims to go long -- EXCLUSIVE CLIP

If you’re an aspiring filmmaker, sometimes the best thing you can do is sell yourself short.

Most of the talk at the Sundance Film Festival is about feature-length movies, but the shorts program is actually where many aspiring directors take their first steps into the storytelling business.

EW spoke with two such filmmakers — one a veteran, one a newcomer — about starting out this way at Sundance. READ FULL STORY

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