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Tag: Jason Reitman (11-20 of 37)

Jason Reitman recruiting Adam Sandler, Jennifer Garner, Rosemarie DeWitt for 'Men, Women & Children'

Adam Sandler may go heavy-duty again. The comedian is getting back into Punch-Drunk Love territory by joining with Jennifer Garner and Rosemarie DeWitt for Men, Women & Children, a darkly satiric film that director Jason Reitman is currently putting together.

The Up in the Air and Thank You For Smoking filmmaker has worked with Erin Cressida Wilson (Secretary, Chloe) to co-write an adaptation of the Chad Kultgen novel, about a group of families coming apart at the seams over sex, loyalty, ambition, and the isolation of an increasingly networked world.

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Telluride: Jason Reitman's new movie headlines 'Labor Day' weekend lineup

The 40th anniversary edition of the Telluride Film Festival unveiled its lineup, as per custom, just days in advance of its presentation in the mountains of Colorado. The five-day event begins tomorrow and will include several movies with Oscar ambitions, including the world premiere of Jason Reitman’s Labor Day, starring Kate Winslet and Josh Brolin.

The Coen brothers’ Inside Llewyn Davis (pictured above), Alexander Payne’s Nebraska, the Robert Redford movie All is Lost, and the erotic French film Blue is the Warmest Color, all of which premiered at Cannes in May, will make their American debuts at Telluride. In addition, Alfonso Cuarón’s Gravity and Errol’s Morris’ documentary on Donald Rumsfeld, The Unknown Known, will play at Telluride before their screenings at the Toronto Film Festival next week.

Telluride will likely add a surprise sneak preview or two before it wraps up on Monday. Last year, Ben Affleck unveiled Argo unannounced at the festival, winning raves that ultimately led to Oscar gold.

Click below for a complete list of the Telluride films. READ FULL STORY

'The Princess Bride': 10 INCONCEIVABLE facts from the Academy's live-commentary screening

“If you came tonight hoping to watch The Princess Bride completely uninterrupted, you really should just leave now.”

This was Up in the Air and Juno filmmaker Jason Reitman introducing last night’s live-commentary screening of the 1987 fairy-tale satire at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. As the film played out on the big screen, Reitman sat in the theater with director Rob Reiner interviewing him about the action onscreen.

“Tonight we’re trying an experiment,” Reitman told the crowd. “I thought there must be a way to take a film everyone has seen a million times, that we love, that occupies such a strong part of our hearts, and somehow get more access to what it was like actually making this film. That’s where this idea came from.”

Reiner started out by asking: “How many people here are under 30? Let me see. Raise your hand.” About a third of the moviegoers raised their hands. “Okay, so you are used to multitasking and not paying attention to anything anyway. This should be fine for you! You’ll watch, you’ll talk, you’ll text … You can play a video game. Whatever!”

“We’ll start watching the film and then, uh, see what comes out!”

Here’s what did:

1. At 60, Peter Falk thought he was too young

2. Hidden Spinal Tap easter egg

3. “As you wish” is a coded message

4. An unexpected fan: Mafia henchman

5. Robin Wright’s first day: Set on fire

6. The LEAST Sicilian Sicilian

7. Andre the Giant was fragile

8. The arsonist in the Fire Swamp

9. Buttercup was (briefly) played by a man

10. The ending that almost wasn’t

Roger Ebert's 71st birthday: Jason Reitman on the critic directors loved

Roger Ebert died on April 4 after a long battle with cancer. To commemorate what would have been his 71st birthday today, EW is republishing this essay by filmmaker Jason Reitman, written in tribute shortly after the critic’s passing.

I spoke with Roger Ebert perhaps a dozen times, but only heard his voice once. READ FULL STORY

'Whiplash': Sundance-winning short to become full-length feature -- BREAKING

The savage Sundance-winning short Whiplash, about a young drummer facing down a brutally antagonizing music instructor, is about to become a feature film.

Writer and director Damien Chazelle adapted the 18-minute short from several scenes in the full-length script with the hope that it would attract investors for the complete version.

Now Bold Films, the production company behind Drive and the upcoming Only God Forgives, has stepped forward to fill out the undisclosed budget. The company will make Whiplash as a joint production with Right of Way Films and Blumhouse Productions, who teamed up to create the short.

In the video above, EW debuted the first clip from Whiplash, which went on to win Sundance’s short film jury award for fiction.

The movie focuses on a drummer (Johnny Simmons) in an elite jazz orchestra conservatory as he struggles to impress a merciless teacher, played by J.K. Simmons (Juno and Spider-Man.)

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All-female cast for Jason Reitman's 'Glengarry Glen Ross' reading -- EXCLUSIVE

Glengarry-Glen-Ross-Grab

Just picture this image with a pantsuit. And some nail polish on that finger.

Oh, and Parenthood‘s Mae Whitman where Kevin Spacey is leaning.

Jason Reitman’s latest live stage-reading of an iconic movie script will replace the male dominated Glengarry Glen Ross with an entirely female cast, marking the biggest overall twist for one of his cinematic recreations since last year’s all black performance of Reservoir Dogs.

Entertainment Weekly has the exclusive details on who else will take on roles from the 1992 film, why he wanted to replace XY chromosomes with XX, and we’ll also give you a preview of the poster for the event. READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2013: Prize-winning 'Whiplash' short aims to go long -- EXCLUSIVE CLIP

If you’re an aspiring filmmaker, sometimes the best thing you can do is sell yourself short.

Most of the talk at the Sundance Film Festival is about feature-length movies, but the shorts program is actually where many aspiring directors take their first steps into the storytelling business.

EW spoke with two such filmmakers — one a veteran, one a newcomer — about starting out this way at Sundance. READ FULL STORY

CONSIDER THIS: Jason Reitman on the original sceenplay of 'Looper'

prize_fighter1_bannerWith Academy Awards voting underway, EW’s Prize Fighter is kicking off the “Consider This” series, asking folks with Oscar histories of their own to share their personal favorites of the year. Jason Reitman, who had a best director nomination for Juno and was a writing, directing and best picture contender for Up in the Air, offered these thoughts about filmmaker Rian Johnson’s screenplay for the time-travel drama Looper, starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt as the younger version of Bruce Willis’ hitman, now forced to target his older self.

Here’s a fun fact… you know what Alien, Blade Runner, Close Encounters and The Matrix have in common? I mean, outside of being timeless groundbreaking movies that changed the way we watch cinema. None of these films were acknowledged for their screenplays — which makes me wonder, is it just because they have flying cars and hyperbaric sleep chambers and creatures with acid in their blood? Perhaps we’re so thoroughly engrossed that we dismiss how these films triumph in their examination of complicated ideas. Or maybe, as writers, we have some sort of prejudice against futuristic costume and production design. READ FULL STORY

'Ghostbusters' live-read grabs Seth Rogen, Jack Black, and Rainn Wilson -- EXCLUSIVE

There’s no replacing Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, and Harold Ramis as the original Ghostbusters, but if you were staging a one-night-only live version of the classic comedy, well … whom might one contact?

Seth Rogen, Jack Black, and Rainn Wilson are going to cross the streams.

The event is one of the monthly live-reads of a famous movie script organized by Juno and Up in the Air filmmaker Jason Reitman, who  — of course — has a family connection to this story. His father, Ivan Reitman, directed Ghostbusters and he remembers hanging around on the set as a little kid.

But even he was surprised when he went back and looked at the original script of the movie for Thursday night’s reading at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

It turns out, Murray was making it all up as he went along. READ FULL STORY

Jason Reitman to re-create Woody Allen's 'Manhattan' in live-read event -- EXCLUSIVE

Poster by Matt Owen; Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Jason Reitman’s staged live-readings of famous movie scripts has become a must-see Los Angeles event, but the next one will pay tribute to the big city on the opposite coast.

Woody Allen’s Manhattan, the 1979 story of a New Yorker who falls in love with his best friend’s mistress, will be the next film recreated by Reitman at the Film Independent series, set for Nov. 15 at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

“From the onset of the Live-Read series, we wanted to hit all the major writers and Woody Allen is simply one of the greatest screenwriters of all time,” the Up in the Air and Juno filmmaker tells EW. “He has ability to match pathos and comedy and drama and then turn it all on a dime. If you’re going to make a series based on dialogue, you can’t find much better than Woody Allen.”

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