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Tag: Jennifer Lawrence (11-20 of 101)

'Mockingjay' teaser trailer reveals Natalie Dormer, Julianne Moore's characters

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Enough propaganda spots! Here’s your first real look at The Hunger Games: Mockingjay—Part I: a full minute of footage focusing on the rival leaders of Panem and the struggles of combatants on the ground. Oh, and there’s a shot of the Mockingjay herself: Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence).

The clip introduces Academy Award nominee Julianne Moore as leader of the outlaw District 13, President Alma Coin. It also gives a brief shot of Game of Thrones actress Natalie Dormer as Capitol film director Cressida. But if there’s a focus in the trailer, it’s on the late Philip Seymour Hoffman’s rebel leader Plutarch Heavensbee as he tries to convince Coin of Katniss’ importance to the uprising. Check out the video below, and may the buffering be ever in your favor: READ FULL STORY

Box office report: 'X-Men: Days of Future Past' still leads Memorial Day movies with $90.7 million

X-Men: Days of Future Past is easily cementing its spot as the top earner this Memorial Day weekend, bringing in $90.7 million by Sunday and proving that nothing kicks off the unofficial start of summer quite like the time-honored tradition of seeing superheroes and villains duke it out for the good of the country.

The time-travel film — directed by Bryan Singer and starring Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Ian McKellan, James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, and Jennifer Lawrence — is now on track to make at least $110 million over the long weekend, making it the second-largest holiday opening for the Fox franchise. (X-Men: The Last Stand took in $1o2.7 million in its first three days of release during Memorial Day weekend 2006). As expected, X-Men: Days of Future Past did well among international moviegoers, opening in 119 countries and territories for a global revenue of $261.78 million. READ FULL STORY

Box office report: 'X-Men: Days of Future Past' opens with $36 million on Friday

In X-Men: Days of Future Past, the U.S. government is terrified that mutants might one day take over. And that’s exactly what they did on Friday, earning an estimated $36 million on the film’s first day in theaters. That debut makes it the third-highest movie opening of the year. (Last weekend, Godzilla crushed the competition with $38.5 million, while Marvel flick Captain America: The Winter Soldier took in a cool $36.9 million in April.)

Starring veteran mutants Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, and Ian McKellan, and X-Men: First Class alums James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, and Jennifer Lawrence, the Bryan Singer-directed time-travel movie was the seventh X-Men film to date — and the most expensive, costing 20th Century Fox an estimated $200 million. EW’s Chris Nashawaty gave it a B+, saying: “Singer’s return in the pretzel-logic pop fantasia X-Men: Days of Future Past is so triumphant because of how effortless he makes connecting the dots seem. It’s an epic that couldn’t be more Byzantine on paper but scans with ease on-screen.” With its opening day gross across nearly 4,000 U.S. theaters, X-Men: Days of Future Past looks to be a bonafide summer blockbuster that will likely  continue to dominate over the four-day holiday weekend. READ FULL STORY

Jennifer Lawrence gets caught blue-handed in new 'X-Men' clip -- VIDEO

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If you have arguably the biggest movie star in the world in your comic book movie, you don’t hide her in the background with a bunch of lesser mutants. That’s the thinking with X-Men: Days of Future Past, which showcases Jennifer Lawrence as the blue-skinned Mystique much more than when she was played by Rebecca Romijn.

In the new time-twisting sequel, out May 23, Wolverine is sent back to 1973 in order to stop Mystique from assassinating Bolivar Trask (Peter Dinklage), the whiz behind the mutant-hunting Sentinels and all sorts of anti-mutant gizmos.

In the clip below, Mystique’s plans to get close to Trask are thwarted by his latest weapon. READ FULL STORY

'X-Men: Apocalypse': Who will return? What new mutants may appear? Scoop on the next X-Men film -- EXCLUSIVE

We’re still weeks away from the unveiling of Fox’s ginormous X-Men: Days of Future Past (the cover of this week’s EW) but, fittingly, director Bryan Singer and producer/writer Simon Kinberg can only look ahead: The pair are developing, along with X2 writers Dan Harris and Michael Dougherty, the next X-Men film, Apocalypse, slated for May 27, 2016. Not much about the film is known, but Singer says that the film will be “somewhat” based on the 1990 comic storyline “Age of Apocalypse,” which features ancient villain Apocalypse and imagines an alternate universe. “[The movie] won’t necessarily create an alternate universe, but there may be some swapping things that I’m playing with,” admits Singer. Adds Kinberg, “From a visual standpoint it actually may be a bigger movie than Days of Future Past because there’ll be disaster movie imagery, like the title would imply.” READ FULL STORY

'X-Men': Could Jennifer Lawrence's Mystique get the next spin-off film?

20th Century Fox’s X-Men: Days of Future Past  doesn’t open until May 23, but that hasn’t stopped its producers from considering spin-off films (Hugh Jackman’s Wolverine is the only character so far to step out on his own), especially given the success that Marvel has had with The Avengers and its roster (Captain America, Thor, Iron Man). “There was a regime [at the studio] that didn’t see the worth in [spin-offs], and the current people who run Fox understand, embrace it, and we’re going to do right by it,” says producer Lauren Shuler Donner, who’s produced all of the X-Men films. “I’d like to do Gambit. I’d like to do Deadpool. We’ll see. There’s a lot of really great characters.” READ FULL STORY

'X-Men: Days of Future Past' trailer: The Sentinels unleashed! -- VIDEO

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Send in the Sentinels!

The new trailer for X-Men: Days of Future Past finally shows us the mutant-hunting robots unleashed by the government — more specifically, by Boliver Trask (Peter Dinklage). Clearly, the Present is one big post-apocalyptic mess; even Old Magneto has regrets. “All those years wasted fighting each other, Charles,” he says… referring to battles over power, biology, and, as it turns out, women.

So Wolverine is sent back to the Nixon administration to right wrongs before Storm (Halle Berry) can be skewered by a Sentinel and mutants find themselves on the edge of extinction. Not everyone is ready to make nice, though, especially Mystique (Jennifer Lawrence), who seems to have a growing blood-lust for normals: “I know what I have to do,” she says. “It’s us or them.”

There’s lots of fire, ice, more-obscure mutants, death, and one exploding White House. Click below for the new clip: READ FULL STORY

'Divergent': Did it get trashed for coming after 'The Hunger Games'?

Divergent, whatever you think of it as a movie (I found it to be your basic, agreeably rousing sensitive-teen-in-Amish-linen-finds-her-inner-tattooed-jock-to-fight-the-power formula dystopian thriller), is, like the young-adult novel it’s based on, a piece of pulp mythology that obviously borrows a lot from The Hunger Games. The heroine who hails from a downtrodden district or, in this case, a faction (Abnegnation) that prizes self-sacrifice; the fascist schemers up top; the whole gym-class-on-steroids feeling of a seemingly normal girl who rises to a series of death-defying physical challenges; and, of course, the sense that the heroine can accomplish all this because, while ordinary on the surface, she’s really different, she’s special, she’s a rebel, she’s divergent in her innate superiority. (Why do I feel as if Leni Riefenstahl would have loved these movies?) READ FULL STORY

David O. Russell talks about 'American Hustle,' being 'reborn' as a director -- EXCLUSIVE

American Hustle director David O. Russell likes sports analogies, which are actually surprisingly helpful in trying to describe his theory on aggressively spontaneous acting. “You see a batter or a basketball player when they’re stuck on something in their heads, that’s not good,” says Russell, who’s “coached” the casts of his last three movies to 11 Oscar nominations, including statues for Christian Bale (The Fighter), Jennifer Lawrence (The Silver Linings Playbook), and Melissa Leo (The Fighter). “Once you have a good focus, you want to keep it. You want to stay in that zone, so you want to work briskly and from instinct. It’s almost like a superstitious thing.”

There’s nothing superstitious, however, about Russell’s recent run of success. American Hustle, which arrived on Blu-ray on Tuesday, was his biggest box-office hit of his career. The star-studded 1970s period piece about a married conman (Christian Bale) and his lover (Amy Adams) who are manipulated by an ambitious FBI agent (Bradley Cooper) to create an ABSCAM-like sting to implicate corrupt government officials, including the mayor of Camden, New Jersey (Jeremy Renner), was an actors’ showcase that also included Lawrence, Robert De Niro, and Jack Huston. The laugh-filled drama landed 10 Oscar nominations, and Russell became the first director to ever direct a film with four actors earning Oscar nominations in each of the acting categories, twice — much less back-to-back.

Russell plans to stay in his zone. He’s currently writing another script for Lawrence, as well as “another big story I’m writing for many of these cast members that I don’t want to talk about yet.”

But he’s happy to talk about American Hustle, which character he thinks is the heart of the film, his unique approach to directing actors, and his understanding that all his success can vanish tomorrow. READ FULL STORY

'Catching Fire' on Blu-ray: Jennifer Lawrence describes the pressure of high expectations -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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If the last two years in Hollywood have taught us anything, it’s that The Hunger Games was never the absolute sure thing that, in hindsight, it seems to be. Yes, Suzanne Collins’ trilogy of books were enormous best-sellers — but so were The Mortal Instruments, Beautiful Creatures, and Ender’s Game. There was no guarantee that the first Hunger Games movie would dominate the box office, that passionate readers of the book would automatically accept the characters as they were depicted onscreen, and that uninitiated moviegoers wouldn’t turn up their noses at all the “Next Harry Potter” hype. The fact that all those things happened is a credit to the filmmakers, but it was hardly inevitable.

Catching Fire arrives on Blu-ray tonight at midnight, and in a special nine-part making-of documentary, the cast and crew describe the imposing challenge of bringing Katniss Everdeen and the denizens of Panem to life. “It was a scary thing that we were doing,” Jennifer Lawrence says in the doc. “It’s hard when you get great books that are so loved by people. It’s impossible not to disappoint somebody.”

Disappointed? Certainly no one at Lionsgate is. The first Hunger Games grossed $408.0 million, and Catching Fire topped that with $423.9 million. It was last year’s biggest hit in the U.S., making Lawrence the first actress to headline a year’s highest grosser since Kate Winslet and Titanic.

In the two exclusive clips below, Lawrence and company describe the pressure they felt to deliver — and the magnitude of success they never could have imagined. READ FULL STORY

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