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Tag: Joaquin Phoenix (1-10 of 33)

'Inherent Vice' premiere: Paul Thomas Anderson doesn't get bogged down by plot

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Thomas Pynchon has written eight acclaimed novels, but no one had the brass to adapt one for the screen until Paul Thomas Anderson tackled Inherent Vice. The director’s second consecutive collaboration with Joaquin Phoenix was the centerpiece gala at the New York Film Festival, where it made its world premiere on Saturday. If the trailer for the film gave off a Big Lebowski vibe, that’s partially because both films are at least partially inspired by The Big Sleep, the classic 1946 noir with Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall. “I saw The Big Sleep and it made me realize I couldn’t follow any of it,” said Anderson, at a post-screening press conference. “And it didn’t matter, because I just wanted to see what was going to happen next anyway.”

The plot of Inherent Vice is equally impenetrable, a tangled web strewn with vivid characters from 1970 Los Angeles. Phoenix plays ‘Doc’ Sportello, a constantly buzzed private eye who’s drawn into a case of coincidences by the beauty who broke his heart, Shasta (Katherine Waterston). She’s been having an affair with a married billionaire (Eric Roberts) whose adulterous wife might want to put him away in a mental asylum in order to get all his money. When both Shasta and her billionaire boyfriend go missing, and Doc awakes from a blow to his head next to a dead body, he has to handle cops and killers, lawyers and sax players, Nazis and coke-headed dentists, and two mysterious entities known as the Golden Fang that may or may not have anything to do with each other.

The film is filled with humor, even as the stakes go up, the characters are stripped bare, and the haze of drug-use rises to fever-dream pitch. (There’s one sequence, with Martin Short’s unscrupulous dentist, that echoes the antsy psychedelia of Alfred Molina’s firecracker scene in Boogie Nights.) “Which is what I love so much about Paul’s work,” said Maya Rudolph, who plays Doc’s secretary. “It’s anything and everything, and yet it’s always his. It allows a scene like in Dr. Blaknoids office to be crazy and then something else to be dark and mysterious.” READ FULL STORY

Joaquin Phoenix won't be playing Marvel's 'Doctor Strange'

Well, it was strange while it lasted. But those hoping to see Joaquin Phoenix channel his searing screen intensity into waves of psychedelic magic in Marvel Studios’ upcoming Doctor Strange movie can hang their heads in disappointment.

The Oscar-nominated actor and the movie multi-verse pioneers have failed to come to an agreement, and now director Scott Derrickson and Co. are looking for a new actor to fill the good doctor’s high-collared cape.

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See Reese Witherspoon and Joaquin Phoenix in 'Inherent Vice'

We’ve already seen a glimpse of Joaquin Phoenix as Larry “Doc” Sportello, the stoner private investigator at the center of the much-anticipated adaptation of Thomas Pynchon’s Inherent Vice.

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Paul Thomas Anderson's 'Inherent Vice' to debut at New York festival

Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice, based on Thomas Pynchon’s 2009 crime novel, will debut at the New York Film Festival this October. The film, which reunites the director with Joaquin Phoenix (The Master) and also stars Josh Brolin, Reese Witherspoon, Owen Wilson, and Benicio Del Toro, is scheduled to open in theaters on Dec. 12. READ FULL STORY

Jeremy Renner is a master of illusion in 'The Immigrant' -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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In The Immigrant, Marion Cotillard plays Ewa, a Polish woman whose American Dream is hijacked almost as soon as she lands on Ellis Island in 1921. All alone, she’s threatened with deportation until she’s rescued by Bruno (Joaquin Phoenix) — a schemer as dastardly as Pinocchio‘s Stromboli, who forces her into a hard life of servitude and prostitution.

Bruno’s cousin, a magician named Orlando (Jeremy Renner), offers Ewa a ray of hope. And in this exclusive clip from the film, Orlando demonstrates a feat as wondrous as the American Dream itself — as long as you’re willing to ignore the tricks that make the illusion possible.

Director James Gray (We Own the Night) based the film in part on the hard-luck immigrant tales his grandparents told him when he was a child. “One of the funnier things I read in the research I was doing was, an immigrant was asked, ‘How do you feel about America?’ He said, ‘Well, they told me the streets were paved with gold. But I didn’t realize that the streets wouldn’t be paved at all, and I would be the one who needed to do the paving,'” says Gray.

Click below for the clip from the film, which opens May 16, and an extensive Q&A with Gray. READ FULL STORY

Joaquin Phoenix to star in Woody Allen's next film

Woody Allen is adding Joaquin Phoenix to his ever-expanding roster of A-list collaborators, landing the Her star for his next film, EW has confirmed.

In true Allen spirit, no other details about the film have been released, though there are reports that production will begin in July.

Allen’s last film, Blue Jasmine, earned a best actress Oscar for Cate Blanchett. Next up for the tireless director is the romantic comedy Magic In The Moonlight, about an Englishman (Colin Firth) who sets out to expose a phony mystic (Emma Stone) and ends up falling for her. READ FULL STORY

'The Immigrant': Marion Cotillard finds hardship in America -- VIDEO

Marion Cotillard plays a Polish immigrant who comes to America full of hope — and stays as a prostitute — in The Immigrant. 1920s America: what a time!

The film, directed by James Gray, was met with glowing reviews at the 2013 Cannes festival. It follows the story of Cotillard’s Ewa, who struggles to find the American dream while working for a pimp (Joaquin Phoenix) as a magician (Jeremy Renner) tries to help set her free.

The Immigrant comes out May 16. Watch the trailer below: READ FULL STORY

Critical Mass: Everyone has a crush on 'Her'

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With Her recently earning nominations from the writers and producers guilds, Spike Jonze’s oddball romance about a lonely writer (Joaquin Phoenix) and his beguiling operating-system (voiced by Scarlett Johansson) is emerging as a solid dark-horse in the season’s Oscar races. Not only do critics adore it, but it’s played well in extremely limited release since opening on Dec. 20. (It expands wide on Jan. 10.)

Set in an indeterminate near future, Her is the story of sad-sack Theodore Twombly. Recovering from a recent divorce, he works at an L.A. greeting-card company that composes intimate personal messages for loved ones. The women he encounters in his personal life don’t suit him — except for his one platonic female friend, played by a mouse-y Amy Adams — so he can’t help but be drawn to his new OS, a flirtatious and comforting presence who pulls him out of his malaise. “That the OS, which he calls Samantha, has the sultry, pack-a-day voice of Scarlett Johansson only heightens the case for why a man might fall for a piece of software,” writes EW’s Chris Nashawaty. “Her soothing voice, awkward stabs at humor, and breathy, eager-to-please laugh are a balm for his wounded soul. She’s a perfect 10 made from 1s and 0s.”

Click below to see what other leading critics had to say before rushing out to see Her: READ FULL STORY

'Her' trailer: Joaquin Phoenix falls in love with Scarlett Johansson's voice -- VIDEO

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“The woman I’ve been seeing… Samantha? She’s an operating system.”

Yeah, so Theodore Twombly’s not exactly Rhett Butler. But in Spike Jonze’s Her, which opens in theaters on Dec. 18, Joaquin Phoenix gives a soulful performance as an introverted man who falls for the voice that organizes his hand-held device. Of course, the voice is Scarlett Johansson, so you can perhaps understand the attraction.

The film’s new trailer is accompanied by Arcade Fire’s “Supersymmetry;” the Canadian band scored the film and a version of the song plays over the closing credits. The music and the visuals can almost make you swoon as Theodore’s falling-in-love montage is missing only one thing — another physical person.

“Is it not a real relationship?” asks his pal played by Amy Adams.

Well… is it?

Watch. READ FULL STORY

Golden Globes refuse to consider Scarlett Johansson's 'Her' performance -- BREAKING

The Golden Globes will not be speaking up on behalf of Scarlett Johansson’s voice.

The vocal performance by the actress in Spike Jonze’s new romantic drama Her has been ruled ineligible by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association for a supporting actress bid, according to sources close to the submission process. The final decision came today after an appeal from distributor Warner Bros.

Just last week, the Rome Film Festival gave Johansson its Best Actress award for the film.  READ FULL STORY

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