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'John Carter': See the original opening scene criticized by Pixar's brain trust -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

It’s no secret that John Carter went through extensive additional photography in its two-year gestation period from production to premiere. While director Andrew Stanton gave a full-throated defense of the new scenes as a part of the creative process he’d learned while working at Pixar, the bad press caused by them contributed to the impression that John Carter was a troubled movie.

One of the biggest scenes that Stanton reshot was the opening to the film. In its Oct., 2011, profile of Stanton, The New Yorker chronicled the Pixar brain trust’s reaction to the scene, which heavily featured Lynn Collins as Barsoomian (i.e. Martian) Princess Dejah Thoris: “[T]hey were confused by the film’s beginning, in which Princess Dejah delivered a lecture about the state of the Barsoomian wars, and they found her arch and stony.”

The opening was re-imagined with a pithier history of the Barsoomian wars, cutting directly to a pitched aerial battle, and much of Collins’ scene was reshot and placed later in the film. But you can see the original scene in this exclusive clip from the John Carter Blu-ray edition (out June 5) below. Many of the visual effects are not complete; the shots of rock faces in the Arizona and Utah desert, for example, were meant to be digitally remade into the crumbling edifices of once-great Barsoomian buildings. But the thrust of the scene is still clear. Check it out:  READ FULL STORY

'John Carter' deleted scene: What is Taylor Kitsch drinking?! -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

Of the many criticisms levied against John Carter, one of the most prevalent was a lack of a sense of humor. The story of the titular Civil War vet (Taylor Kitsch) transported to the war-torn surface of Mars via a mysterious cave of gold had plenty of dashing derring do, but surprisingly few moments of levity. In this exclusive deleted scene from the film — available on DVD and Blu-ray on June 5 — we get a peek at one of the film’s lighter moments, as the massive green Tharks Tars Tarkas (Willem Dafoe) and Tal Hajus (Thomas Haden Church) lug Carter back to their home camp just hours after he plopped onto the planet. You’ll note that the scene was cut early in post-production — none of the visual effects are completed, and you can still see Dafoe and Church in their Thark performance-capture costumes, which include tiny cameras directed at their faces.

Check it out below: READ FULL STORY

Taylor Kitsch: 'I would do 'John Carter' again tomorrow.'

It is an old Hollywood maxim that everyone flees from failure. When a big movie bellyflops at the box office — like John Carter, which has pulled in a cringe-inducing $62 million in the U.S. in its first three weekends, barely a fourth of the film’s $250 million budget — usually everyone involved tries to get as much distance as they can from the film, as quickly as they can get it. Everyone’s hoping to salvage not only their careers, but their psyches as well, especially when that much blood, sweat, and treasure has been invested in a passion project that’s become a media punching bag.

Apparently, no one told Taylor Kitsch this is how he’s supposed to behave. READ FULL STORY

Disney will lose $200 million on 'John Carter'

After its underwhelming $30.2 million opening two weeks ago, things weren’t looking too hot for Disney’s Mars-set adventure film John Carter, which reportedly cost $250 million to produce and an additional $100 million to market.

But there was still some hope that the sci-fi/Western hybrid, which earned an encouraging “B+” rating from CinemaScore audiences, would sport box-office legs as sturdy as its protagonist’s. That wasn’t the case, as John Carter plummeted 55 percent last weekend. Consequently, Disney released a statement today announcing that the studio expects to take a write-down of $200 million as a result of the expensive flop. READ FULL STORY

Box office report: '21 Jump Street' cops a $35 million weekend; 'John Carter' doesn't get the hold it needs

Channing Tatum and Jonah Hill may play totally inept undercover cops in 21 Jump Street, but at the box office, they’re proving much more effective. The R-rated comedy scored a tremendous $35 million in its opening weekend, enough to easily top the chart. READ FULL STORY

Box office update: '21 Jump Street' shoots up $13.1 million on Friday

R-rated comedy 21 Jump Street (starring Channing Tatum and Jonah Hill) topped the box office on Friday with a tremendous $13.1 million in its first 24 hours. The well-reviewed television adaptation–it earned a “B” CinemaScore grade–may pull in about $35 million over the Friday to Sunday period, which is a gross typically reserved for comedic summer tentpoles — not any old springtime release. I’d guess that 21 Jump Street‘s terrific start will trigger a sequel announcement within a week. Sony could have a new smash franchise on their hands. READ FULL STORY

Box office preview: '21 Jump Street' hopes to jump past 'The Lorax'

After John Carter’s disappointing opening frame, this weekend brings moviegoers only one new wide release, 21 Jump Street, which looks like a potential smash that could birth a franchise. Although a number of limited releases — Will Ferrell comedy Casa De Mi Padre (382 theaters), Nicholas Cage thriller Seeking Justice (230 theaters), and Jason Segel/Ed Helms comedy Jeff, Who Lives at Home (250 theaters), — are hitting multiplexes, they aren’t likely to make much impact on the box office. Friends With Kids‘s expansion from 369 to 640 theaters might give it a small boost, but on the whole, the chart will likely look very similar to last weekend. Here’s how things may shake out: READ FULL STORY

Box office disasters: The real lesson of 'John Carter,' and has Eddie Murphy finally run out of words?

The chattering classes of the infotainment-sphere love to kick a movie debacle in the shins. But from the moment that John Carter opened, the perceptions of how big — or maybe not quite so big — a disaster it was were a tad hazy, and they trickled in slowly. A dry dust storm of digital effects, corny fetishized machismo, and bad acting out of the loincloth-and-galactic-tiara school, John Carter, as just about everyone in the solar system had predicted, underperformed in a dramatic way. But was it merely a “disappointment,” or a major flop, or, in fact, a good old-fashioned game-changing heads-will-roll executives-will-commit-seppuku debacle? What did the $30 million opening-weekend gross stacked up against the movie’s $250 million price tag really mean? READ FULL STORY

'John Carter': How big a bomb is it?

One month ago, Andrew Stanton was optimistic about making a sequel to John Carter, his $250 million sci-fi adventure about a 19th-century outlaw (Taylor Kitsch) who is teleported to Mars in the midst of an alien war. “I’ve been spending the last six months writing the next one with Michael [Chabon],” he told EW in February.

Then John Carter opened to a middling $30.1 million last weekend, making Stanton’s goal seem about as realistic as his movie’s interplanetary premise. READ FULL STORY

How will 'John Carter' affect Taylor Kitsch's career? Industry insiders weigh in

No actor wants their first starring role to be in an underperforming movie, let alone one of the most high profile box office misfires in years. So for Taylor Kitsch, the fallout from John Carter‘s weak second place, $30.6 million opening weekend in the U.S. is certainly unwelcome — although perhaps not as mortally damaging to his career as one might expect. Disney’s marketing campaign for the $250 million film focused far more on selling the spectacle than introducing the Next Big Movie Star, so audience disinterest in the film won’t be blamed on Kitsch. “He doesn’t bare the brunt of it in the way that Taylor Lautner does with Abduction, or Sam Worthington with Man on a Ledge,” says a senior production exec at a rival studio. “Those are movies that are hung on those guys, and if the movies fail, the guys pay full price.”

On the other hand, in just two scant months, the 30-year-old Kitsch headlines another mega-budgeted, effects-driven, sci-fi tentpole that Hollywood regards with a cocked eyebrow: Universal’s BattleshipREAD FULL STORY

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