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Tag: Kodi Smit-McPhee (1-5 of 5)

'Young Ones' poster: Michael Shannon soaks up screen in parched Western

Young-Ones

Whether it’s a Krypton fascist, an ice-blooded hitman, or a conflicted Prohibition-era G-man, Michael Shannon is accustomed to playing menacing. But in Young Ones, the new dystopian sci-fi Western that premiered at Sundance in January, he gets to show another side.

“People are used to seeing Mike play very intense, dangerous characters, but I think he’s much more of a classic movie star than maybe people even realize,” director Jake Paltrow said before the film’s premiere. “I think what you’ll see in Mike is a warmth that maybe you haven’t seen in a lot of things—in this, he’s a flawed man who loves his children so much and is sort of trying to do anything he can to ensure their survival.”

The problem is water, or the lack of it. Two decades or so in the future, water is scarce and drought has scorched the American west, where a family has stubbornly stayed behind with the hopes of revitalizing their farm—if Shannon’s Ernest can persuade the industrial drillers in the nearby mountains to run a water-line to his place. Elle Fanning plays his rebellious daughter, who falls for a rebel on a motorcycle (Nicholas Hoult) who wants some of the same things Ernest does. Crown prince of the dystopian cinematic future, Kodi Smit-McPhee (The Road), plays Ernest’s loyal but distant son. “The core of the movie—at least in the beginning—is really this friendship between this father and son,” said Paltrow.

Click below (or on the above photo) to see the exclusive new poster for Young Ones. READ FULL STORY

Video: Nicholas Hoult fights Michael Shannon for water in 'Young Ones' trailer

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Water is scarce in Young Ones, Jake Paltrow’s latest film, but tension is everywhere as the world fights over the now-precious resource.

The futuristic film, which first premiered at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, stars Michael Shannon, Elle Fanning, and Kodi Smit-McPhee as a family struggling to find water in the barren Western-like wasteland opposite Nicholas Hoult, a teenager trying to take over the family’s land for himself.

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Kodi Smit-McPhee hopes to create a 'new nostalgia' in 'A Birder's Guide to Everything' -- EXCLUSIVE POSTER

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At only 17, Kodi Smit-McPhee is probably best known for starring in somewhat macabre projects — from Let Me In to The Road, his precocious darkness and intense gaze seem to always be on display. Even ParaNorman‘s Norman Babcock was a bit of an outcast. Even though A Birder’s Guide to Everything isn’t exactly devoid of difficult emotional truths (and OK, OK, a gawky high school kid obsessed with birding might still fit into “charmingly misunderstood outcast” territory), Smit-McPhee was thrilled to finally get to work with actors his own age.

“I was into the nostalgia of having a group again — a kid group like Goonies, Stand by Me, going on an adventure,” said Smit-McPhee. He’d never seen the River Phoenix coming-of-age pic till his co-star Alex Wolff introduced him to it during filming. Viewings quickly became an on-set ritual. “We used to go to each other’s rooms and watch the movie all the time. It was really fun,” he said.
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Check out the first trailer for Julian Fellowes' 'Romeo and Juliet' -- VIDEO

The first trailer for the newest adaptation of Romeo and Juliet is now online, and there’s plenty of ancient grudges, unclean civil hands, and death-marked love on display in this peek at the film.

While the other buzzy Shakespeare adaptation of 2013 — Joss Whedon’s Much Ado About Nothing — went the route of a fresh, modern interpretation, this Romeo and Juliet is going back to the play’s Elizabethan roots, with period costumes, a shoot in Verona and other Italy locations, and a young pair of actors playing the leads. The film’s Juliet, Hailee Steinfeld (True Grit), who shot the film when she was 15 years old, is much closer to Juliet’s age (nearly 14) than most actors taking on the role these days, and the film’s Romeo, Douglas Booth (The Pillars of the Earth) was 19 during production.

But as traditional as this adaptation is, the trailer has some modern touches, like the song “Skin” by industrial pop artist Zola Jesus. The preview also does some interesting things structurally, kicking off with the very last lines of the play, and concluding on quite a sweet, romantic note (complete with a ride off into the sunset) that we all know is not how we’ll see Romeo and Juliet’s tragic story end when the film opens in theaters later this year.

Check out the trailer below: READ FULL STORY

'ParaNorman' star Kodi Smit-McPhee on the scariest part of playing the role -- EXCLUSIVE FIRST LOOK

As the title hero of the stop-motion animated film ParaNorman (out Aug. 17), Kodi Smit-McPhee gives voice to an 11-year-old kid who is capable of seeing, and speaking, to the dead. It’s certainly familiar territory for the young Australian actor, best known for the bleak post-apocalyptic film The Road and the grim vampire tale Let Me In. “Actually, my favorite genre is comedy,” he says with a laugh. “It’s pretty ironic and funny that I always get these kind of dramatic, sad, kind of low-down movies that are really intense, I guess. But I don’t mind. I think it’s good to get those types of movies, ’cause they’re the ones that stick with you.”

As you can see in the exclusive photo from ParaNorman below, the character of Norman Babcock has to deal with some very spooky business. Smit-McPhee says never really got that scared himself doing the role, but acting the non-verbal noises that come with being chased by petrifying zombies was definitely a challenge. “An example would be when [Norman’s] on the toilet and it starts to shake, I would have to actually sit in the chair and shake myself,” he says. “That’s probably the hardest part, just all those weird noises. We went from like little [heavy breathing] pants, and worked our way up even bigger, bigger, bigger, to terrified stuff. It was actually pretty draining.”

Check out this first look from the film to get a sense of what’s causing Smit-McPhee’s Norman all this consternation (click on the image for a larger version):  READ FULL STORY

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