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Tag: Kurt Russell (1-10 of 12)

Exclusive 'Battered Bastards' trailer: Kurt Russell and the misfits that rocked baseball

Kevin Costner’s Durham Bulls. Charlie Sheen’s Cleveland Indians. Walter Matthau’s Bad News Bears. Wildly rambunctious baseball teams that became beloved cinematic all-stars. But they were no Portland Mavericks, the real-deal franchise that grabbed minor-league baseball by the short hairs in the mid 1970s.

In the Netflix documentary, The Battered Bastards of Baseball, directors Chapman and Maclain Way turn back the clock to 1973, when their grandfather, Hollywood actor Bing Russell (Bonanza), purchased the Class A Portland franchise and fielded a completely independent team against a league of teams stocked with Major League Baseball prospects. He held open tryouts and recruited cast-offs who were looking for second—or last—chances to make it the big leagues. “It was just a wild-ass ball club of wild-ass guys,” says Russell’s son, Kurt, the famous actor. “They were very serious about playing and they wanted to have the opportunity to show those clubs that had let them go that they had made a mistake.”

Check out the exclusive trailer below: READ FULL STORY

Netflix announces documentaries, beginning with Sundance hit, 'Battered Bastards of Baseball'

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Netflix is making a push into documentaries, with plans to premiere four in the next few months.

Netflix has always made nonfiction films available to subscribers — but until recently, the site featured only films that had been made for theatrical release or television networks. Now Netflix wants filmmakers to make documentaries specifically for Netflix – or to use Netflix to offer their work’s first wide distribution.

Battered Bastards of Baseball, about a defunct minor league team, will premiere on Netflix July 11. Mission Blue, about marine biologist Sylvia Earle, is set for Aug. 15. READ FULL STORY

'The Hateful Eight': Quentin Tarantino says he's still working on the film

The Hateful Eight isn’t dead after all.

Quentin Tarantino vowed to kill the project – a Wyoming-set, post-Civil War western — when the script was leaked in January.

“I’m going to publish it [as a book], and that’s it for now,” the director said at the time. “I give [the script] out to six people, and if I can’t trust them to that degree, then I have no desire to make it. I’ll publish it. I’m done. I’ll move on to the next thing. I’ve got 10 more where that came from.”

But at an all-star reading of The Hateful Eight script on Saturday, the director admitted things had changed. READ FULL STORY

Knicks hoops documentary headlines Tribeca/ESPN Sports Film Festival

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The New York Knicks are one of basketball’s most storied franchises but they haven’t won an NBA title since 1973. Celebrity fans like Spike Lee, Woody Allen, and screenwriter William Goldman worshipped the star-studded — but team-first — Knicks teams of that championship era, and a generation of aging sportswriters refuse to let those hardwood legends die. Actor Michael Rapaport was only three years old when the Knicks won their last title, but he’s turned his yearning for those glory years into a documentary, When the Garden was Eden.

Rapaport’s movie, which is also part of ESPN’s “30 for 30″ series, headlines this year’s Tribeca/ESPN Sports Film Festival, and will be the program’s gala premiere on April 17. “As a native New Yorker and lifelong Knicks fan, it was an honor to explore the championship New York Knick teams,” Rapaport said in a statement. “Those players have been a part of my vocabulary since I was a child…Walt Frazier, Earl Monroe and Willis Reed are icons of New York City and it’s been a privilege to be a part of re-telling the Knicks story.”

Also premiering is Champs, which examines how the brutal sport pulled all-time greats, like Mike Tyson and Evander Holyfield, out of a life of crime and poverty.

Click below for the entire Tribeca/ESPN lineup, descriptions courtesy of the festival: READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Todd Field looks back on the 'Battered Bastards of Baseball' -- EXCLUSIVE

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The Portland Mavericks baseball team were more than just mavericks. They were outlaws. In 1973, Hollywood actor Bing Russell roared into Oregon and established the Mavericks as an independent minor league team, meaning he had to recruit players that the Major Leagues franchises had rejected, a scrap heap that included a fair share of burn-outs, head-cases, and outright degenerates. “Guys were gambling in the back of the bus, there was drugs, there were women everywhere,” says Oscar-nominated director Todd Field (Little Children). “These guys were pirates.”

Field didn’t write or direct the Battered Bastards of Baseball, the documentary about the Mavericks that premiered at the Sundance Film Festival on Jan. 20. But he does play an important role in the doc directed by Russell’s grandsons, Chapman and Maclain Way. Long before he broke into Hollywood, Field was the Mavericks’ wide-eyed 13-year-old bat-boy, watching his heroes act like the Lost Boys of Summer for as long as they possibly could. There was nobody who wasn’t half-baked or out of their mind on that team — in really good ways and in ways that were kind of scary,” he says. “They all played together and they all laughed together and they all fought together and they all got drunk together. And in that way, yes, it was a very Robert Louis Stevenson [Treasure Island] kind of situation for me.” READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Kurt Russell goes deep for 'Battered Bastards of Baseball' -- EXCLUSIVE

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Before anyone thought of The Bad News Bears, Slapshot, and Major League, there were the Portland Mavericks. In 1973, after professional baseball had abandoned the Oregon city, Hollywood actor Bing Russell — Deputy Clem on Bonanza — jumped at a chance to organize the only independent minor-league team in the country. Facing skepticism from a city that had been hoping for an actual major-league team and starting from scratch without any players, Russell held open tryouts for any has-been or never-will-be. “He put this team together of misfits, a ballclub made up a bunch of crazy individuals,” says Bing’s son, Kurt Russell, who co-owned and played for the Mavericks. “There’s never been another ballclub like that. His favorite movie and the favorite part he ever played in the theater was The Music Man. And in real life, there was a lot of Music Man to Bing Russell.”

Baseball and Hollywood have always been dueling passions for the Russells — both father and son played minor-league ball — and both are at the heart of The Battered Bastards of Baseball, a documentary premiering at this week’s Sundance Film Festival. Bing’s grandsons, Chapman and Maclain Way, were inspired to co-direct the movie after uncovering old Mavericks memorabilia at their grandparents’ house, like the team photo that features players wearing backwards uniforms and guzzling beers (see below). READ FULL STORY

Kurt Russell on kindred spirit Paul Walker: 'He was a hell of a good guy'

Kurt Russell has played his share of tough guys and gear-heads — in movies like Death Proof and the recent festival indie The Art of the Steal — so he was always a logical target for the ever-expanding Fast and Furious franchise. Last September, Vin Diesel broke the news that Russell was on board for Fast and Furious 7, and Paul Walker later told MTV News that Russell would play a “father-figure” type to his character, Brian O’Conner, and Diesel’s Dom Toretto.

Of course, Walker’s tragic and untimely death, from a high-speed car accident, was a giant blow to those who knew him, including Russell. “That was a terrific guy,” says Russell. “I just met him on the [movie] and I was just very struck by how similar our lives are and how we looked at life. All the things he did outside of acting that he really enjoyed were similar to the things that I like to do. He was a hell of a good guy.”

Universal suspended production and is currently reconsidering ways to complete the movie for its April 2015 release date. “I’m waiting to hear what we’re going to do and how that’s going to go forward,” says Russell, who soon heads to the Sundance Film Festival, where his extended family has several projects being showcased. “At the time, we were talking about [my character] possibly going into a future episode as a sort of father-figure to Vin and Paul’s character — or possibly die in Fast and Furious 7. The character was created to go either way, and it will be interesting to see what they do now, if there’s any change in that. I don’t know if there will be. But obviously, they’re working hard on doing what they have to do to try to make that thing work. I think they’re going to gear up again in February or March, so we’ll see.”

'Fast & Furious 7': Vin Diesel shares first photo with Kurt Russell

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Even Dominic Toretto knows to bow down in the presence of Snake Plissken.

“Kurt Russell, such an honor to work with,” Fast & Furious 7 star Vin Diesel wrote on his Facebook page along with a photo of himself, franchise staple Paul Walker, and Hollywood vet and cult action hero Kurt Russell. Sadly, there’s no eye patch in sight.
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Casting Net: Kurt Russell in talks for 'Fast and Furious 7'; Plus, Bradley Cooper, more

• Hollywood veteran Kurt Russell is in talks to join the seventh installment of the Fast & Furious franchise in an undisclosed part for director James Wan (The Conjuring). We kind of hope he’ll just be playing Snake Plissken. The famously private actor has been somewhat absent from movies recently. 2007′s Death Proof was his last high-profile role. Russell has a few more projects in the works including the Jay Baruchel-starring comedy The Art of the Steal, and Bone Tomahawk, a Western with Peter Sarsgaard and Jennifer Carpenter. [Variety]

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Kurt Russell, Mark Hamill, and more, spill secrets at first annual CapeTown Film Festival -- VIDEO

The first annual CapeTown Film Festival, the brainchild of Entertainment Weekly’s CapeTown gamemaster Geoff Boucher, attracted fans of all ages for seven nights of classic superhero and sci-fi movie experiences, beginning with an early screening of Iron Man 3, and including the 30th anniversary celebration of Return of the Jedi. But it wasn’t just the nostalgia that made the festival a splendid success; it was the in-depth conversations with legends like Nimoy, Kurt Russell (Escape From New York), Mark Hamill, and Terry Gilliam (12 Monkeys).

Not everyone could get to Los Angeles or in to Egyptian Theatre for the festival — tickets for the most popular panels quickly sold out. But EW.com has an entire library of video from the chats, including Boucher’s Q+A with Marvel godfather Kevin Feige and Tim Stack’s interview with some of the cast from The Goonies.

Click below for the next best thing to being there. READ FULL STORY

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