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Tag: Leonardo DiCaprio (31-40 of 94)

New 'Great Gatsby' character posters feature glitz, glamour, green light -- PHOTOS

Between the trailers, the stills, and your vague recollections of 9th grade English class, you may feel like you’ve already seen Baz Luhrmann’s take on The Great Gatsby. Even so, this awards bait adaptation turned summer blockbuster certainly looks appealing — especially in these pensive new character posters, which combine fabulous ’20s style with the shiniest eyes this side of The Host.

Can English rose Carey Mulligan credibly embody American Jazz Age icon Daisy Buchanan? Will Leonardo DiCaprio’s Gatsby force the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to finally come to its senses? And what’s Tobey Maguire like these days, anyway? We won’t know for sure until Gatsby is finally released May 10 — but in the meantime, these six images can get the discussion started. Prepare to be borne back ceaselessly into the past:

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'The Great Gatsby' to open Cannes Film Festival

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The Cannes Film Festival has an American flavor this year, with a Hollywood icon heading the jury and a quintessential U.S. literary figure opening the event: The Great Gatsby.

Organizers said Tuesday that the film The Great Gatsby, with Leonardo DiCaprio in the title role and directed by Australian Baz Luhrmann, will open this year’s Cannes festival — in 3-D, no less.

Luhrmann stressed the film’s French connection, saying in a statement that author F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote “some of the most poignant and beautiful passages” of The Great Gatsby at a French Riviera villa not far from Cannes. Tobey Maguire and Carey Mulligan also star in Luhrmann’s version of the 1925 novel.

Steven Spielberg is heading the jury at the Cannes festival this year, which runs May 15-26.

Read more:
‘The Great Gatsby’ trailer
Joel Edgerton on ‘The Great Gatsby’ moving to Summer 2013: ‘It feels appropriate’
Steven Spielberg to lead Cannes jury

Leonardo DiCaprio on film violence: 'Pain is temporary, film is forever'

Leonardo DiCaprio says filming violent scenes like in Django Unchained doesn’t deter him from wanting his movies to be great art.

The bloody revenge film about slavery before the U.S. Civil War has fueled some of the debate about whether Hollywood shows too much on-screen violence. DiCaprio portrays a ruthless plantation owner encountered by a freed slave and bounty hunter (Jamie Foxx and Christoph Waltz).

“My philosophy has kind of always been the same: Pain is temporary, film is forever,” DiCaprio said Thursday in South Korea.

“You do everything you possibly can, you give it your all, all of your focus, and hopefully you come out with, if all the elements mixed together correctly, you come out with a great piece of art,” he said. “To me, cinema is the great modern art form.” READ FULL STORY

'Django Unchained': DiCaprio and cast discuss working with Tarantino -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

The American Western is one of the most gloriously well-tread Hollywood trails, but when Quentin Tarantino heads west — or in the case of Django Unchained, south — he becomes a cinematic Meriwether Lewis, bringing his own storytelling panache to a genre we only think we know. In fact, for a movie that stars Hollywood heavyweights Jamie Foxx and Leonardo DiCaprio (and Christoph Waltz and Samuel L. Jackson and on and on…) it’s an incredible tribute to his reputation that he, the director, is the film’s biggest draw. Django Unchained, the story of a slave who becomes a bounty hunter to free his bride from the evil clutches of a maniacal plantation owner, is a Quentin Tarantino movie first and last. And everyone involved knows it, including its biggest star. “He’s got his own unique, specific style,” says DiCaprio, who flirted with working with the director on Inglorious Basterds, “And when you see a Quentin Tarantino movie, you know it.”

The movie, which opened on Christmas Day (ha!) to Garcinia Cambogia reviews and enormous box office returns, is a testament to Tarantino’s unique love of Westerns and the reverence his passion engenders from other talented artists in the business.  In an exclusive behind-the-scenes video below, the cast and crew talk about “coming to his church every day.” READ FULL STORY

'The Great Gatsby' trailer: The son of wealthy people, all dead now -- VIDEO

The new trailer for Baz Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby puts a sharp focus on Leonardo DiCaprio’s titular gold-hatted party-monger. “I am the son of some very wealthy people,” he explains. “Sadly, they’re all dead now.” Then he brandishes a medal of valor and drives real fast through Roaring ’20s New York. It’s roughly at this point that the trailer turns into an extended visual orgy of fireworks and dancing and green lights across the water. There’s something very sensuous about it — overripe, as if all sorts of funny fruits are going to fall into your hands. Occasionally a line of gray cars crawls along an invisible track, gives out a ghastly creak, and comes to rest, and immediately the ash-gray men swarm up with leaden spades and stir up an impenetrable cloud, which screens their obscure operations from your sight. So, you know, typical blockbuster fare. Watch the trailer: READ FULL STORY

'The Great Gatsby' posters: Isla Fisher and Joel Edgerton as Myrtle and Tom -- PHOTOS

Baz Luhrmann’s 3-D take on The Great Gatsby, which was originally set to open Christmas Day but will now be released May 10, stars Leonardo DiCaprio, Carey Mulligan, Tobey Maguire, Isla Fisher, and Joel Edgerton. The first character posters acknowledge the film’s famous literary roots with quotes from F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1925 book about two of its main supporting characters. In the first picture, check out Edgerton as Tom Buchanan alongside Fitzgerald’s passage about “careless people”: READ FULL STORY

'Django Unchained' Los Angeles premiere canceled post Connecticut school shooting

In the widened wake of Friday’s horrific shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut, The Weinstein Company has canceled Tuesday’s planned Los Angeles premiere of Django Unchained.

“Our thoughts and prayers go out to the families of the tragedy in Newtown, CT and in this time of national mourning we have decided to forgo our scheduled event,” said a Weinstein spokesperson in a statement. “However, we will be holding a private screening for the cast and crew and their friends and families.”

The bloody exploitation homage to Italian westerns directed by Quentin Tarantino and starring Jamie Foxx, Leonardo DiCaprio, Christoph Waltz, Samuel L. Jackson and Kerry Washington is set to open in theaters Christmas Day.

For more film news

Read more:
In Sandy Hook shooting’s wake, stars discuss movie violence
President Obama speaks at Newtown memorial service — VIDEO

Leonardo DiCaprio on playing his first villain, the 'deplorable, indulgent, horrendous' Calvin Candie in 'Django Unchained'

Quentin Tarantino’s rogues gallery is already a rather wretched hive of scum and villainy, replete with ear-slicing sociopaths like Mr. Blonde and silver-tongued monsters like Hans Landa, so Django Unchained’s own malefactor, Calvin Candie, should feel right at home.

Candie isn’t just the latest in a long line of Tarantino baddies, but also the first truly villainous role for Leonardo DiCaprio. And he’s no mere well-heeled heel: the director has said Candie is the only villain he’s written in his career that he truly despises, while DiCaprio too found the Southern cotton king, whose decadent lifestyle includes pitting his slaves against each other in fights to the death, to be a truly nasty specimen. “He was one of the most deplorable, indulgent, horrendous characters I’ve ever read in my life,” says DiCaprio. He’s also the dragon that needs slaying before Jamie Foxx’s gunslinging former slave can rescue his true love.

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'Django Unchained': Three new clips include Jamie Foxx facing off against Globe-nominated Leonardo DiCaprio -- VIDEO

With Leonardo DiCaprio snagging a best supporting actor Golden Globe nod this week for his villainous role in Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained, out in theaters Christmas Day, the lens has narrowed on the normally hero-prone actor embodying a cackling, cruel plantation owner.

Turn your eyes, then, to these three clips from the exploitation spaghetti western homage, below. In this first clip, DiCaprio showcases sleazy, blue-eyed charm as Calvin Candie, facing off against Jamie Foxx as freed slave Django. READ FULL STORY

Quentin Tarantino's 'Playboy' interview reveals who almost starred in 'Django Unchained' -- EXCLUSIVE

It’s been widely reported that director Quentin Tarantino first wanted Will Smith to star in the title role of his upcoming slavery-era Western Django Unchained. When Smith turned it down, the role eventually went to Oscar-winner Jamie Foxx, but in this exclusive excerpt from his interview in the December issue of Playboy, Tarantino reveals for the first time that there were several other actors in contention for the part — and he was planning on pitting them against each other.

“I met six different actors and had extensive meetings with all of them, and I went in-depth on all of their work,” Tarantino tells Playboy (in the issue that will be on stands Nov. 20). READ FULL STORY

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