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Tag: Mark Ruffalo (1-10 of 30)

'Begin Again' trailer: Mark Ruffalo and Keira Knightley make sweet, sweet music -- VIDEO

What happens when you combine two recently-dumped individuals who share a passion for music?

You get the trailer for Begin Again, which stars Mark Ruffalo as an ex-record executive. He discovers Keira Knightley, a rock-n-roll ex-girlfriend, singing in a bar. The two then join up to make a record together … outside.

Begin Again, which was originally titled Can a Song Save Your Life?, also stars Hailee Steinfeld, Adam Levine, James Corden, Catherine Keener, and obviously, CeeLo Green, because what’s a movie about music without a Voice reunion? Written and directed by Once‘s John Carney, Begin Again will close the Tribeca Film Festival in April.

Watch the trailer, which debuted on Today Friday morning, below:

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Keira Knightley musical to close Tribeca Film Festival

Once director John Carney’s upcoming musical with Keira Knightley, Mark Ruffalo, and Adam Levine will close the 13th Tribeca Film Festival in New York on April 26. “Begin Again is a true New York story about the magical opportunities that can be found under this great city’s bright lights,” said Carney in a statement. “That said, I can’t think of a better place to have its U.S. premiere than the Tribeca Film Festival.”

Previously titled Can a Song Save Your Life? when it premiered at last fall’s Toronto Film Festival, Begin Again tells the Once-like romance between a washed-up music exec (Ruffalo) and a heartbroken songwriter (Knightley) whose ex (Levine) has just become a spoiled superstar. “The idea of an A&R man discovering an act and what discoveries are left and what does fame sort of mean anymore were some of the themes I wanted to talk about in this movie,” Carney told EW in Toronto. “What I liked about the conflict between Keira and Ruffalo in the film, which I hope people are seeing, is what does an old-school A&R man do with a young talent who genuinely doesn’t want the limelight?”

The film co-stars Hailee Steinfeld, Catherine Keener, and CeeLo Green.

The 13th annual Tribeca Film Festival will take place from April 16 to April 27.

Sundance 2014: Mark Ruffalo and Zoe Saldana talk 'Infinitely Polar Bear' -- VIDEO

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EW’s Sara Vilkomerson sat down with Infinitely Polar Bear stars Mark Ruffalo and Zoe Saldana, as well as writer/director Maya Forbes, to talk about the film at Sundance.

Check out the video below! READ FULL STORY

Globes Behind the Scenes: What you WON'T see on television

All night EW reporters are on the scene at the Golden Globes –  in the ballroom, in the press room, on the red carpet and at the after parties — and we will be giving you inside dish on everything happening behind the scenes that you can’t see on TV. Check back often for updates as the night continues.

BEFORE THE SHOW
“Excuse me,” says the young woman in the striking red dress. Sarah Paulson, busy fixing her eyebrows in the bathroom mirror slowing turns her head to see her 12 Years a Slave co-star Lupita Nyong’o standing at the sink next to her. They may have played slave owner’s wife and slave on screen, but these two proved to be thick as thieves in the bathroom, where they began screaming like two young school girls when they saw each other.

DURING THE SHOW

Not every Hollywood star loves their time hobnobbing with other celebs. Spotted: actor Mark Ruffalo hiding in the corner behind the table dominated by press. The actor and activist with a healthy Twitter account was hiding on his phone. “I’ve got to admit I’m a little out of my body tonight,” he told EW. Paula Patton fixed that. Moments later Ruffalo was being chatted up by the vivacious actress Paula Patton, and was clearly entertained by her company.

In the smokers’ lounge: Kate Beckinsdale entertained a gaggle of ladies fawning over her dress. Elizabeth Moss kissed her Globe for a photo, and Joaquin Phoenix chatted up a journalist with a mouth full of crackers that he had carried in his pocket from the buffet table. He said he was considering  using the crackers in a bit should he get called up on stage for his work in Her, but he didn’t return to to the buffet to grab more. Instead he tipped the bartender $20 and wandered off with his director, Golden Globe original screenplay winner Spike Jonze.

Melissa McCarthy and husband Ben Falcone, plus Judd Apatow and Leslie Mann, the cast of Modern Family all made a beeline for the exit before the Best Picture winner was announced.

Producer/fiancier Ryan Kavanaugh was holding hands all night with Minnie Driver. Beau Bridges walked out, thanking the security guards as he left.

Spirits were low at the 20th Century Fox/Fox Searchlight viewing party for the Golden Globes most of the night. 12 Years a Slave had lost in every category, and things looked bleak for the movie. When Johnny Depp came out to announce Best Drama, many who had worked on the film, or fought for months campaigning on its behalf, we’re only half-listening. Then, the ultimate shock: Depp read the envelope, and 12 Years a Slave had won. There was a moment, a gasp, had everyone heard that right? Then — pandemonium. It was impossible to hear any of director Steve McQueen’s speech over the cheers.

Meanwhile, the Fox TV network viewing party, with a Brooklyn loft theme under a tent on top of the Beverly Hilton parking garage, was very upbeat. Normally the studio wins awards but the network does not. Tonight there were screams of shock and delight for the Andy Samberg and Brooklyn Nine-Nine wins. EW asked Fox Chairman Kevin Reilly if he feels vindicated for his faith in Brooklyn, which was given a full-season order and a Super Bowl slot, despite the show’s low ratings. “It’s not vindication,” Reilly says. “I’m just really happy. It’s the right timing for a show on the rise. And it’s great when you love a group both personally and creatively.”

Check back for more behind-the-scenes reports and follow us on Twitter at #EWGlobes. (Reporting by Nicole Sperling, Lindsey Bahr and Anthony Breznican)

Toronto: 'Once' director John Carney explains how he cast 'Can a Song Save Your Life?'

Once, the 2007 Oscar-winning movie about the musical connection between a broken-hearted Dublin busker and a piano-playing Czech immigrant, was one of those rare movies whose charm couldn’t be bottled in a critic’s blurb or even explained in a full review. You just had to see it to fully understand how a simple story with simple characters could make you, the audience, feel wonderful and alive and believe wholeheartedly that a song could save your life. That movie starred Glen Hansard, the lead singer of the Irish band the Frames, and his ex-bandmate John Carney directed the film.

Six years later, Carney brought a new film to the Toronto Film Festival last week, and though he insists he intended to do something quite different than Once, there’s no denying that Can a Song Save Your Life? aims to strike a similar chord. Keira Knightley plays a sensitive songwriter whose musical partner and boyfriend (Adam Levine) is about to become famous because a few of his songs were in a hit movie. As his fame tears them apart, she wallows in despair at a New York open-mic night, where she’s “discovered” by a desperate A&R man (Mark Ruffalo) who is looking for anything to cling to. Like in Once, the creative process of making music is cinematic alchemy, and the two drifting souls eventually have to decide where — and with whom — they really belong.

When Can a Song Save Your Life? premiered last weekend in Toronto, where it was seeking a distribution deal, audiences — and buyers — were immediately entranced. Harvey Weinstein cornered Carney at the film’s post-premiere party and wouldn’t let their conversation end until the director made a deal with The Weinstein Company. The next day, TWC announced its $7 million acquisition (and a $20 million advertising commitment), guaranteeing that Can a Song Save Your Life? will play in theaters across the country when it opens, most likely in 2014. Carney spoke to EW about the music business, casting judges from The Voice, and what it’s like to get the hard-sell from someone like Harvey Weinstein.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: I suspect this movie will evoke a very similar audience reaction to Once, because these fragile characters also connect through their shared love of music. Where did this story begin for you?
JOHN CARNEY: I was thinking about what part of my life I could mine, and I felt that it would be fun to look back at A&R guys, who were always sort of looking for the next big thing. I was in a band after I left school, and I guess the ’90s were really that last hurrah of A&R craziness, with coke habits and five-star hotels and unlimited credit cards and stuff like that. I thought it would be interesting to see where those guys are now, now that the music industry has changed so much. The idea of an A&R man discovering an act and what discoveries are left and what does fame sort of mean anymore were some of the themes I wanted to talk about in this movie. What I liked about the conflict between Keira and Ruffalo in the film, which I hope people are seeing, is what does an old-school A&R man do with a young talent who genuinely doesn’t want the limelight?

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'Thanks for Sharing': Gwyneth Paltrow and Mark Ruffalo are having relationship woes -- EXCLUSIVE CLIP

Yep, you read that right — Pepper Potts is dating the Hulk in the upcoming romantic dramedy, Thanks for Sharing. But the film, directed by The Kids Are All Right screenwriter Stuart Blumberg, is about real people who are far from superheroes. It focuses on Mark Ruffalo’s character, Adam, who is a recovering sex addict who’s recently reentered the world of dating. Paltrow plays Phoebe who is coming off a recent relationship with an alcoholic and has sworn off addicts of all types — until Adam comes into her life. Although one look at her Tracy Anderson-ed bod in the clip below and we’re pretty sure she’s addicted to the pilates reformer.

In the intense scene below, Paltrow and Ruffalo are finding themselves in a difficult spot as Ruffalo deals with being in a new relationship after five years of sex “sobriety.”
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Toronto 2013: 'Can a Song Save Your Life?' shows that 'Once' is enough

In a culture that thrives on irony, detachment, the postmodern hum of advertising, and the communicative cool enforced by technology, good old sincerity — remember that golden oldie? — can seem not just out-of-date but a little embarrassing. Who wants to be caught saying what they mean and meaning what they say, or wearing their heart on their earnest, pleading sleeve? John Carney does. He’s the Irish-born writer-director of Can a Song Save Your Life?, an unapologetically sincere movie that is modeled on the beautiful, almost desperate sincerity of the music-movie that put Carney on the map: Once, that lovely and enchanting 2007 pop bagatelle about two lost souls who connect through song, and who find a love so ethereal that it transcends even…love. At the time, Once felt like a one-of-a-kind movie, and I think it was, but Carney has other ideas. He’s out to make that gentle wistful lightning strike twice. READ FULL STORY

Sony Pictures Classics sets release date for Steve Carell and Channing Tatum pic 'Foxcatcher'

Moneyball director Bennett Miller’s highly anticipated Foxcatcher, starring Steve Carell, Mark Ruffalo, and Channing Tatum, will hit theaters on Dec. 20, Sony announced Thursday.

Foxcatcher tells true story of Dave Schultz (Mark Ruffalo) and his younger brother Mark (Channing Tatum), both Olympians, and their fraught and dangerous relationship with John du Pont (Steve Carell), a paranoid schizophrenic and heir to the du Pont fortunes. A late December release date positions the film in an ideal space for awards consideration. Miller’s previous narrative films, Moneyball and Capote, both received significant awards buzz. He even picked up a Best Director nod for Capote.

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See the 'Thanks for Sharing' poster with Gwyneth Paltrow and Mark Ruffalo

We’re addicted to stories about sex addiction.

The ailment gets the romantic dramedy treatment in Stuart Blumberg’s directorial debut Thanks for Sharing, a multi-character story about three sex addicts in therapy and their attempts to live in the world. Gwyneth Paltrow and Mark Ruffalo lead the ensemble cast as Phoebe and Adam, a new couple just trying to make things work in spite of Adam’s addiction.

Josh Gad and Pink also feature heavily in the film as a pair of addicts who seem to find solace and comfort in each other’s company. Co-written by Blumberg (The Kids Are All Right) and Matt Winston, the film premiered at the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival, and co-stars Tim Robbins, Joely Richardson, and Patrick Fugit.

The trailer teased a bittersweet tone reminiscent of The Kids Are All Right, but, how do you make a poster about such a complicated, and seemingly R-rated subject matter? Take a look after the jump and let us know what you think.

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'Thanks for Sharing' trailer: Mark Ruffalo and Gwyneth Paltrow try to make it work

Mark Ruffalo, sex addict? In the upcoming film Thanks for Sharing, Ruffalo stars as one of a group of recovering sex addicts that also includes Book of Mormon star Josh Gad and Alecia Moore — a.k.a. Pink. Ruffalo’s Adam falls for Gwyneth Paltrow’s Phoebe, who’s sworn off dating alcoholics and dismisses his plight by saying what we’re all thinking: “Isn’t that just something guys say they’re doing when they get caught cheating?” Needless to say, she gives in, to the tune of a pretty racy black lace number.

The eclectic cast also features Patrick Fugit (Almost Famous), Tim Robbins, and Carol Kane.

Check out the trailer for the film, which was directed and co-written by Ruffalo’s The Kids are Alright collaborator Stuart Blumberg, below. READ FULL STORY

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