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Tag: Marlon Brando (1-3 of 3)

Catching up with Sacheen Littlefeather, 40 years after her controversial brush with Oscar history

It was one of the most memorable moments in the history of the Academy Awards—and one of the most controversial: Awarded the Best Actor Oscar for his instantly iconic performance as Don Vito Corleone in The Godfather in 1973, Marlon Brando sent an unknown 26-year-old Native American activist and aspiring actress named Sacheen Littlefeather up to the stage to refuse the statuette on his behalf. As the stunned audience erupted with a confused mix of boos and applause, Littlefeather explained that Brando was regretfully turning down the award to protest “the treatment of American Indians today by the film industry” and the ongoing siege of 200 American Indian Movement activists by armed authorities in Wounded Knee, S.D. “I beg at this time that I have not intruded upon this evening,” she concluded before leaving the stage, “and that we will, in the future, our hearts and our understandings will meet with love and generosity.” READ FULL STORY

Documentarian hopes to make film about failed movie that inspired fake movie in Affleck's 'Argo.' Got that?

Ben Affleck’s Argo tells the true-life tale of a CIA agent who posed as the producer of a science fiction epic to rescue six Americans trapped in Iran in 1979. Now, another filmmaker wants to tell you a different part the story — but he needs your help to finish it.

For six years, Judd Ehrlich has been working on a documentary called Science Fiction Land, and the Emmy-nominated filmmaker just launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise $50,000 to complete the project. The non-fiction flick takes its title from a proposed theme park that would have been spun out of the success of a would-be sci-fi blockbuster, and profiles the unrealized ambitions of an idealistic Hollywood dreamer named Barry Ira Geller. Says Ehrlich:  “My documentary explores the real life sci-fi story that’s truly stranger than fiction.”

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Maria Schneider in 'Last Tango in Paris': Farewell to an art-film baby doll

LAST-TANGO-IN-PARIS_320.jpg   Image Credit: Everett CollectionI felt a special pang of nostalgic melancholy when I learned, on Thursday, that Maria Schneider had died of cancer. She was only 58, but what highlighted the sadness of her passing is that there’s one role that, for a lot of us, will define her forever, and in that one role she incarnated the spirit and beauty and giggly bloom of youth. Yes, she was good in a few other movies (notably The Passenger), but to me she will always be Jeanne, the baby-cheeked Parisian dumpling of Last Tango in Paris (1972), who descends into a torrid three-day tryst/dance/relationship/psychodrama with a desolate middle-aged widower played by Marlon Brando. Schneider was only 19, an unknown model-slash-actress with just a single movie role behind her, when director Bernardo Bertolucci cast her opposite the most legendary movie star in the world, who at that moment was on his way back to becoming the greatest screen actor in the world. More than just a movie, Last Tango would be a study — of sexual desire, of midlife agony, of Brando himself, of freedom and loss, of what movies could really be if they opened up, more than ever, to the actors who lived inside them. READ FULL STORY

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