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Tag: Martin Scorsese (1-10 of 57)

Martin Scorsese to exec produce Grateful Dead documentary

Get ready, Deadheads. The Grateful Dead turn 50 next year and to celebrate, they’re getting a new documentary from executive producer Martin Scorsese and director Amir Bar-Lev (Happy Valley).

The still-untitled doc will feature never-before-seen footage from various performances, archived interviews and behind-the-scene moments as well as new talks with surviving members Mickey Hart, Bill Kreutzmann, Phil Lesh, and Bob Weir. It’ll also feature the eccentric characters from the “Dead universe.” Band archivist David Lemieux will serve as the music supervisor.

Acclaimed documentary filmmaker Bar-Lev noted that he’d first set out to make a film about the Grateful Dead 10 years ago. While there have been many documentaries, concert films and television specials chronicling aspects of the seminal band, including a 10-minute short from Paul McCartney, the press release notes that this film will be the first official career-spanning portrait of the influential rockers.

“The Grateful Dead were more than just a band. They were their own planet, populated by millions of devoted fans,” said Scorsese in a statement. “I’m very happy that this picture is being made and proud to be involved.”

The surviving members agreed heartily, saying jointly that they’re “humbled to be collaborating with Martin Scorsese. From The Last Waltz to George Harrison: Living In The Material World, from Bob Dylan to the Rolling Stones, he has made some of the greatest music documentaries ever with some of our favorite artists and we are honored to have him involved. The 50th will be another monumental milestone to celebrate with our fans and we cannot wait to share this film with them.”

It might be time to outfit that old VW microbus with a television.

Matt Damon and Paul Greengrass are 'Bourne' again. Are they Hollywood's top actor/director pair?

In a development that feels more inevitable than surprising, Matt Damon and Paul Greengrass are in talks to get back into the Bourne business. The two had sent mixed messages over the years, ever since Jason Bourne disappeared in the murky East River at the end of The Bourne Ultimatum in 2007, with the major roadblock being Damon’s insistence that a reluctant Greenglass direct, while Universal handed the franchise over to writer-turned-director Tony Gilroy. But with Gilroy’s Bourne Legacy, starring Jeremy Renner, failing to live up to the original three Bourne films at the box office, and Damon’s recent non-Bourne projects, like Elysium, also failing to catch fire (or Oscar buzz), a reunion seemed to be in everyone’s best interests—and maybe sooner rather than later.

Damon and Greengrass are kindred spirits, with a similar artistic and political outlook that’s been on display in their two Bourne films and Green Zone, the 2010 action movie that poked the Bush Administration’s 2003 invasion of Iraq. Greengrass, a former TV journalist, directed Tom Hanks in Captain Phillips last year, and had been contemplating tackling a Martin Luther King biopic. But Damon and Bourne seem to be calling now, and Universal is ready to slot their next adventure together into summer 2016.

Directors and actors have a mystical way of finding each other, and when something clicks, they often seek that comfort zone again and again. The most frequently cited example of an actor and director who’ve repeatedly brought out the best in each other are Robert De Niro and Martin Scorsese, who collaborated on eight films, beginning with 1973’s Mean Streets. Frequently, such relationships are between peers of the same generation, with the actor becoming the director’s on-screen stand-in. Other times, an older director takes an actor under his or her wing, as either an apprentice or a muse. (Think Woody Allen and Scarlett Johansson.)

But who are the most compelling actor/director pairings working today? Whose films become immediate must-sees when their names line up on the same movie poster? EW ranked the 20 most interesting and exciting actor/director collaborators today, with Damon and Greengrass in the mix. READ FULL STORY

Martin Scorsese interested in directing a Ramones movie

The period between Martin Scorsese films is routinely filled with several speculative reports trumpeting fascinating-sounding “next” projects. There’s his long-gestating Sinatra movie, his plans to unite Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, and Joe Pesci in The Irishman, and a biopic about the formative years of Teddy Roosevelt. Maybe they’ll get made someday; maybe not. His next concrete project is Silence, with Andrew Garfield and Adam Driver, which starts shooting next year—but another potential film project is already drawing attention. READ FULL STORY

Read Martin Scorsese's passionate defense of Kodak film

On the heels of Kodak’s decision to continue its production of film stock after finalizing a deal with major Hollywood studios just last week, the venerable Martin Scorsese issued a heartfelt statement in support of the move, writing: “This news is a positive step towards preserving film, the art form we love.”

As the Chair of The Film Foundation, Scorsese recognizes the advantages of HD and the realities of modern movie-making while still enthusiastically embracing the importance of film, not only as a “building block” of the art form but also as something that continues to inform the current aesthetics of movies. “Film is still the best and only time-proven way to preserve movies,” he writes. “We have no assurance that digital informaton (sic) will last, but we know that film will, if properly stored and cared for.”

Read his full statement below.

We have many names for what we do – cinema, movies, motion pictures. And…film. We’re called directors, but more often we’re called filmmakers. Filmmakers. I’m not suggesting that we ignore the obvious: HD isn’t coming, it’s here. The advantages are numerous: the cameras are lighter, it’s much easier to shoot at night, we have many more means at our disposal for altering and perfecting our images. And, the cameras are more affordable: films really can be made now for very little money. Even those of us still shooting on film finish in HD, and our movies are projected in HD. So, we could easily agree that the future is here, that film is cumbersome and imperfect and difficult to transport and prone to wear and decay, and that it’s time to forget the past and say goodbye – really, that could be easily done. Too easily. READ FULL STORY

Paramount willing to pay for Martin Scorsese's 'Silence'

Paramount, which released Martin Scorsese’s three most recent films, including last year’s The Wolf of Wall Street, is close to a deal that will partner the studio and the Oscar winner again on Silence, his next film. Sources close to the production confirm a Deadline report that the studio is aiming for a November 2015 release of the movie, which will star Andrew Garfield and Adam Driver as two 17th-century Jesuit missionaries in Japan in search of a missing mentor. Liam Neeson and Ken Watanabe also will star. READ FULL STORY

'Wolf of Wall Street' hit with $25 million defamation suit

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Andrew Greene, who worked with notorious broker Jordan Belfort at Stratton Oakmont, is suing Paramount Pictures and the producers of The Wolf of Wall Street, including Leonardo DiCaprio’s production company Appian Way, for $25 million because he claims the Oscar-nominated film defames his reputation. In the film, actor P.J. Byrne plays Nicky “Rugrat” Koskoff, a character with a ridiculous toupee that is portrayed as “a criminal, a drug user, and a degenerate” that Greene claims is falsely based on him.

In Belfort’s 2007 memoir, on which the film is based, Greene’s real name was used, but according to the lawsuit, Greene never gave the filmmakers his consent for his involvement in the film — perhaps explaining the character’s name change. Greene claims that he has been maliciously and willfully defamed “as a criminal and drug user with misogynistic tendencies. Mr. Greene is portrayed as an individual with no moral or ethical values, which is injurious to him in his trade, business, or profession.” READ FULL STORY

'Wolf of Wall Street's Thelma Schoonmaker on her historic partnership with Martin Scorsese

For years, Martin Scorsese’s most famous collaborator was Robert De Niro, who starred in the director’s most iconic movies, including Mean Streets, Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, and Goodfellas. In recent years, the director has formed a similar relationship with Leonardo DiCaprio, making five celebrated films. The Departed, their third movie together, finally won Scorsese his elusive Oscar for Best Director, and last year’s The Wolf of Wall Street is currently up for five Oscars, including two each for both men, who also produced the movie.

This Thursday and Friday at New York’s hallowed Ziegfeld Theater, all five Scorsese/DiCaprio films will be screened during a two-day retrospective, anchored by a special panel discussion on Thursday night with DiCaprio, Wolf of Wall Street screenwriter Terence Winter, and the film’s editor, three-time Oscar winner Thelma Schoonmaker.

De Niro and DiCaprio may be the director’s favorite stars, but his greatest collaborator over the years has been behind the scenes. Schoonmaker has cut 18 of Scorsese’s feature films, including every one since Raging Bull, for which she won her first of three Oscars. The pair met at NYU in the early 1960s, where Schoonmaker had signed up for a six-week filmmaking course, and Scorsese desperately needed help to salvage his student film, What’s a Nice Girl Like You Doing in a Place Like This? It was a fortuitous encounter that has led to some of cinema’s most revered films.

Below, Schoonmaker discusses her work with Scorsese and describes the unique bond between the director and DiCaprio. READ FULL STORY

Directors Guild Awards: Alfonso Cuaron wins for 'Gravity'

UPDATED: Gravity does not seem to be falling on the awards circuit. Alfonso Cuarón walked away with the top honor at the Directors Guild of America Awards Saturday night in Los Angeles, beating out Martin Scorsese, David O. Russell, Paul Greengrass, and Steve McQueen.

“This is truly an honor and I am humbled by it,” Cuarón said to the audience of his peers after last year’s winner Ben Affleck presented him with the award. But Gravity was not the work of just one mind, and no one knows that more keenly than Cuarón. “Directing is about the work of your collaborators,” he said. Earlier in the evening, when Gravity was spotlighted amongst the five Feature Film nominees, Cuarón thanked his team including his first assistant director Josh Robertson, co-writer (and son) Jonas Cuarón, his cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki, and his visual effects team. Then he said: “I barely understand how we made the film.” The audience laughed uproariously.

The DGA Awards are generally a pretty decent indicator for who will walk away with the Best Director Oscar. Comprised of over 15,000 voting members, the Directors Guild does have a tendency to skew more mainstream when compared with the choices of the 377 voting members of the Directors branch in the Academy. But in the past ten years, the DGA winner has gone on to win the Oscar 90% of the time. In fact, in 65 years, only 7 DGA winners failed to win the Academy Award. Last year, however, was a major outlier when Ben Affleck won the DGA for Argo after he’d failed to pick up an Oscar nomination.

The DGA did deviate from the Oscars in other fairly significant ways last year. The nominees only matched 2 out of the 5 Oscar nominees. This year, it was 4 out of 5. Captain Phillips director Paul Greengrass was the odd man out — the Academy included Alexander Payne for his work on Nebraska instead.

For Cuarón, the win only seems to add to his awards momentum. In addition to a host of Film Critics awards, Cuarón also won a Golden Globe earlier this month.

The DGA doesn’t just honor features, though. Oscar nominee Jehane Noujaim picked up an award for her documentary The Square, Steven Soderbergh won for Behind the Candelabra, and Vince Gilligan was recognized for directing the Breaking Bad finale “Felina.” Check out the full list of winners from the 66th Annual DGA Awards after the jump.

READ FULL STORY

'Raging Bull' copyright appeal going to Supreme Court

The Supreme Court pondered Tuesday whether the daughter of the man whose work was the basis of the Oscar-winning movie Raging Bull should go another round with a major movie studio over copyright infringement for ownership of boxer Jake LaMotta’s life story.

The Raging Bull case involves an appeal from Paula Petrella, the daughter of Frank Petrella, whose written work inspired the movie. Frank Petrella collaborated with his friend LaMotta on two screenplays and a book, which were used to make the movie directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Robert De Niro. The 1980 film won two Oscars, including best actor for De Niro.

The elder Petrella died in 1981, with his copyrights reverting to his daughter. She sued Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. for copyright infringement for creating and distributing copies of the movie, but the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said she waited too long before filing her lawsuit.

Now she wants justices to resurrect her lawsuit. They will make a decision later this year.
READ FULL STORY

Meryl Streep 'wins' National Board of Review Awards, takes swipes at Disney

The National Board of Review announced its 2013 honorees on Dec. 4, with Her, Nebraska, and Fruitvale Station claiming some of the top prizes. That meant the only real suspense last night at the organization’s New York City gala was who would win the crowd and earn the best howls. Rob Reiner nearly stole the show, but it was Meryl Streep who brought down the house at Cipriani’s on 42nd Street. Streep, presenting the Best Actress award to Emma Thompson for Saving Mr. Banks, left her friend “nauseous with gratitude” with a heart-felt introduction that also took swipes at Walt Disney and the Disney brand. READ FULL STORY

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