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Tag: Miles Teller (1-10 of 15)

'Fantastic Four' casting: Fox zeroes in on its final 4

It’s almost clobberin’ time. Twentieth Century Fox is in serious talks with a quartet of in-demand actors to cast its new Fantastic Four. According to The Wrap, Miles Teller, Kate Mara, Jamie Bell, and Michael B. Jordan are close to signing on for the superhero reboot from director Josh Trank. Jordan, who worked with Trank on Chronicle, has long been rumored to play Johnny Storm, the Human Torch, but Fox declined to confirm that a deal for the Fruitvale Station actor, or the other three stars, had been reached — yet.

Teller, who starred opposite Jordan in That Awkward Moment, is considered the frontrunner for Reed Richards, a.k.a. Mr. Fantastic. Mara (House of Cards) reportedly recently auditioned for the role of Sue Storm, a.k.a. the Invisible Woman, and Bell (AMC’s upcoming series, Turn) is linked to the CG-enhanced rock-hulk, the Thing, a.k.a. Ben Grimm.

Don’t expect Fox to take too much more time to announce their superheros. Fantastic Four already has a release date of June 19, 2015.

Casting Net: Colin Farrell must find love in 'The Lobster'; Plus, Miles Teller, more

• Colin Farrell and Rachel Weisz (The Constant Gardner) have signed on to star in The Lobster, set in a dystopian future where finding a partner is “a matter of life and death.” Dogtooth director Yorgos Lanthimos is making his English-language debut on the project, which also stars Ben Whishaw (Cloud Atlas) and Lea Seydoux (Blue Is the Warmest Color). [THR]

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Miles Teller offered role of Dan Aykroyd in John Belushi biopic

Miles Teller—the in-demand star of The Spectacular Now, the upcoming Divergent franchise, and this month’s Sundance opener Whiplash—has been offered the role of Dan Aykroyd in the upcoming biopic of John Belushi, EW has confirmed. Emile Hirsch is set to star as the late comedian, with Steve Conrad writing and directing, and Aykroyd on board as executive producer. Teller’s rep says that the actor is going to hold off on making a final decision until he finishes promotional duties for That Awkward Moment, a rom-com with Zac Efron and Michael B. Jordan that opens in U.S. theaters on Jan. 31.

The Hollywood Reporter first revealed that Hirsch broke the casting news on Saturday night at a Sundance party for the Creative Coalition. “A shout-out to Miles Teller!” he reportedly told the room, where Teller was in attendance. “We’re going to be working together soon. He’s playing Dan Aykroyd in the Belushi movie.”

Meanwhile, Sony Pictures Classic snapped up distribution rights to Whiplash for just under $3 million on Friday.

'Whiplash' stars Miles Teller and Paul Reiser talk about their buzzy Sundance movie

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Fresh off their festival-opening premiere, 28-year-old director Damien Chazelle, and actors Miles Teller, Paul Reiser, Melissa Benoist, and Auston Stowell dropped by EW’s Sundance Lounge to chat about their buzzy new film Whiplash.

Teller and Chazelle described the prep work the 26-year-old actor (who also has a role in the upcoming Divergent movie) had to put in on the drums to play his character Andrew Neiman, a brilliant, driven young jazz drummer under the tutelage of an abusive maestro played by J.K. Simmons. (EW’s Owen Gleiberman describes the film as “a jazz version of the very good inside-classical-music drama Mr. Holland’s Opus crossed with a drill-sergeant-from-hell classic like An Officer and a Gentleman, with Simmons in the Lou Gossett Jr. role.”) READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: 'Whiplash' is the movie that could make Miles Teller a star

The opening-night movie at the Sundance Film Festival is often, almost by design, a mild, light, forgettable affair. A lof of filmmakers don’t want the opening slot, and the basic idea is that the bar can’t be raised too high, because then you’ll risk making all the movies that come afterward look disappointing. But Whiplash, which opened the 30th anniversary edition of Sundance last night, didn’t just raise the bar — it electrified the spirits of everyone who saw it, including me. It stars Miles Teller, who had his breakthrough role in last year’s Sundance favorite The Spectacular Now (and will soon be seen in Divergent), and Whiplash confirms that he’s truly a spectacular actor, with a slightly damaged glamour and a face you can’t stop watching because of all the feelings it registers. Last year, I said that Teller reminded me of Elvis Presley. In Whiplash, he’s more like the young John Cusack, but with a cockiness that never hardens into attitude; it’s open and shifting. He plays Andrew Neiman, a brilliant, driven young jazz drummer who is attending the Schaffer Academy in Manhattan, a (fictional) performing-arts institution that, as presented, is one of the best music schools in the country. There, he comes under the tutelage of the school’s fearsome and legendary taskmaster — a scarily exacting maestro of jazz named Terence Fletcher, played, in a bravura performance, by J.K. Simmons. This isn’t the cuddly, twinkly Simmons we’ve grown used to in recent years. In skin-tight black T-shirts, his shaved head set off by mad-dog eyes and a squiggly vein running down the side of his temple like an electric wire, he’s more like Bruce Willis with three times the ferocity. READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: 'Whiplash' director on the price of greatness and the intensity of J.K. Simmons

It’s going to be a memorable Sundance Film Festival if the rest of the movies can keep up with the beat that Whiplash laid down last night. The opening-night premiere from 28-year-old director Damien Chazelle tells the story of an ambitious jazz-drummer prodigy (Miles Teller) who bumps up against an intimidating tyrant of a music teacher played by J.K. Simmons. Bad-ass bald, with bulging biceps that fill his fashionable black t-shirts, Simmons’ Terrence Fletcher is a cruel taskmaster who bludgeons his students with torrents of mocking, often homophobic, invective in his mission to create true genius. Fletcher toys with them psychologically and bullies them physically, like some musical Bobby Knight. “I remember when I first met [J.K.], I just sort of told him, “Remember how you were in Oz? I want to make that guy look like the teacher in Mr. Holland’s Opus,” Chazelle said to the audience after last night’s premiere.

Chazelle himself was a serious jazz drummer in high school, and he based the poisenous relationship on one he had with one of his own mentors. “Drums had always been like a fun hobby for me, and for four years, when I was in that ensemble, it became just a source of constant dread,” he said last night. “Just looking back, it was an interesting experience because I became a much better drummer than I know I ever would’ve, but I also didn’t enjoy it at all. And maybe for people who feel that music should be about joy and fun, it was missing the point. So those were certain questions that I was grasping with and I just wanted to write about it.”

That Whiplash — which refers to a jazz composition composed by Hank Levy — got a prime Sundance showcase is a great tribute to Chazelle’s crew, and an honor to the festival’s spirit. Last year, Whiplash won the Sundance price for Best Short film, and Chazelle spent the last 12 months turning an 18 minute short, that was specially created as a sample to show potential investors, into a deeper, richer two-hander that questions all the blood, sweat, and tears that seem to be the price of greatness. Sony Pictures quickly picked up the distribution rights to some international markets. A big number for the price of the domestic rights would not surprise anyone who witnessed last night’s premiere. (Though if the film becomes a hit, Simmons’ future as a comforting, vest-wearing pitch-man for Farmers Insurance might soon need to be rethought.)

Chazelle, who also wrote the screenplay for Grand Piano, spoke to EW before the premiere about his movie. READ FULL STORY

Shailene Woodley talks YA trifecta 'Spectacular Now,' 'Divergent,' and 'The Fault in Our Stars' -- EXCLUSIVE CLIP

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2013 was a year stuffed with high-profile film adaptations of young adult bestsellers — most of which ended up crashing and burning at the box office. (Alas, Beautiful Creatures, Mortal Instruments, Percy Jackson, and Ender’s Game — no Harry Potter-style cultural dominance for you.) But while each of those big-budget spectacles flailed, a humbler YA-based movie quietly emerged as the year’s best teen flick: The Spectacular Now, out on DVD today.

Spectacular is a sweet but dark love story about gregarious alcoholic Sutter (Miles Teller) and his relationship with his smart, slightly nerdy classmate Aimee (Shailene Woodley). What you may not realize before seeing the film, however, is that The Spectacular Now isn’t just a typical teen romance told through an indie-fied lens. “I think it’s a very unhealthy dynamic that the two of them have together,” Woodley recently told EW. “One of the things that first drew me to Spectacular Now was that in high school, so many girls fall in love with someone, and they end up losing a lot of who they are because they’re so into the other person. And I went through that in high school, where I sort of gave myself away for a different human being. It was a really toxic relationship.”

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'That Awkward Moment' when... a chick infiltrates the brodown -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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To the (re)tweeters go the spoils! After a personal plea from That Awkward Moment stars Zac Efron, Michael B. Jordan, and Miles Teller, you, the EW readers, took to Twitter and RT’d your way to an exclusive clip.

Click through to watch what happens when two dudes find out their bro has done the unthinkable — invited a matching set of X chromosomes into the most sacred man-space of all. (Hint: things might get a little… well… awkward.) READ FULL STORY

'That Awkward Moment' red-band trailer: 'This is a den of testosterone' -- NSFW VIDEO

Miles Teller is back in another three-young-guys-party-hard trailer, but this time, things are a little less college and a little more … adult? Well, not quite.

Also starring Michael B. Jordan and Zac Efron, That Awkward Moment is all about three guys who are enjoying their “den of testosterone” and living the single life exactly how Bridget Jones wouldn’t — less ice cream, more booze! But nights filled with shots and Viagra (naturally) get complicated when women, love, and all that grown-up stuff attempts to get in the way. Or, as they put it, that “I-have-a-girlfriend sh–.” Not-so-hidden message: Relationships are lame.

Watch the NSFW red-band trailer below:
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Kyle Chandler on 'The Spectacular Now', 'Wolf of Wall Street', and those 'Friday Night Lights' rumors

For the devoted, it’s hard to watch Kyle Chander play anyone but man-among-men Coach Eric Taylor from Friday Night Lights. But in the terrific, bittersweet indie The Spectacular Now—Owen Gleiberman calls it “one of the rare truly soulful and authentic teen movies“— Chandler plays a character who’s practically the anti-coach: a deadbeat, boozy and long-absent father to Miles Teller’s character. READ FULL STORY

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