Inside Movies Breaking Movie News and Scoops | Movie Reviews

Tag: movie (61-70 of 1525)

Director Jesse Thomas Cook talks his gross-out horror film 'Septic Man'

Septic-Man

In the new Canadian horror movie Septic Man, Jason David Brown plays a sewage worker who falls into a septic tank and gradually mutates into a monstrous beastie. Brown won Best Actor in a Horror Film award at last year’s Fantastic Fest genre festival for his performance—but this gross-out film is not one to watch while you’re eating. Then again…

READ FULL STORY

Adrian Garcia Bogliano starts shooting black comedy 'Scherzo Diabolico'

Scherzo-Diabolico

Director Adrián García Bogliano has yet to release his most recently completed film, the werewolf tale Late Phases. But EW can reveal that the prolific filmmaker has commenced principal photography on his next movie in Mexico City. The film is called Scherzo Diabolico and, according to the official release, it “brings Bogliano back from the supernatural realm to a wild black comedy about a bored and frustrated accountant who decides to kidnap a girl who will become his worst nightmare.”

READ FULL STORY

See two new posters for Antonio Banderas' sci-fi movie 'Automata'

automata-01

Antonio Banderas has dabbled in science fiction with The Skin I Live In and the Spy Kids movies. But the Spanish actor goes full-on future-shock in his new film, Automata. Set half a century into the future, the film stars Banderas as an insurance agent who investigates cases of defective androids and, according to the official synopsis, “uncovers a truth that is far more complex than the make or model of any machine.”

READ FULL STORY

Awesome zombie movie 'The Battery' now has a making-of doc

The-Battery

How do you make one of the best low-budget horror movies of the past few years? With a lot of booze and no underwear. At least, that’s what the folks responsible for zombie film The Battery claim in the trailer for a making-of documentary—which will be included among the bonus extras when Scream Factory releases the film on Blu-ray and DVD, September 16.

READ FULL STORY

Will Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon get romantic in 'The Trip to Italy'?

In the 2011 comedy The Trip, British funnymen Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon—playing themselves—entertainingly bickered their way around the north of England while reviewing restaurants for U.K. newspaper The Observer. The pair have now reteamed for a second course of quips, face-stuffing, and Michael Caine impersonations in the self-explanatory sequel The Trip to Italy.

READ FULL STORY

How much of 'Dog Day Afternoon' is a true story? Find out in 'The Dog'

the-dog

On August 22, 1972, a man named John Wojtowicz attempted to rob a bank in Brooklyn to pay for his lover’s sex-change operation—at least, that is what has been long believed. The bungled heist would later inspire Sidney Lumet’s classic 1975 film Dog Day Afternoon, which starred Al Pacino as “Sonny Wortzik” and John Cazale as his fellow robber, Sal. Now, four decades on, Allison Berg and Frank Keraudren have made The Dog, a documentary which relates the real, incredible true story of that August day, and what happened to Wojtowicz afterwards.

READ FULL STORY

Director Brian Trenchard-Smith talks John Cusack comedy-thriller 'Drive Hard'

drive-hard

Brian Trenchard-Smith has been a director for 40 years and has made around the same amount of movies, from 1975’s George Lazenby-featuring action film The Man from Hong Kong through 1986’s cult film Dead End Drive-In to last year’s straight-to-DVD thriller Absolute Deception, which starred Cuba Gooding Jr. “I’ve never met a green-light I didn’t like,” chuckles the urbane auteur.

READ FULL STORY

'Atari' doc trailer digs deep into legend of infamous 'E.T.' video game

et

How did computer company Atari rise so quickly and why did it collapse so horribly? What role did the infamous E.T. video game play in that disastrous corporate fall? And did the company really bury vast quantities of the Spielberg spin-off in a New Mexico landfill site?

READ FULL STORY

See the creepy new poster for Nicholas McCarthy's 'At the Devil's Door'

At-The-Devils-Door

A few years back, shortly before the release of his debut horror film The Pact, writer-director Nicholas McCarthy told EW, “I think hearing people scream is almost too addictive of a moment for me—I want to do it one more time.” Now, McCarthy is doing it one more time with At the Devil’s Door, another likely scream-inducing project which is released on VOD on August 8 and arrives in cinemas September 12.

READ FULL STORY

5 things Hollywood learned about Latino moviegoers this summer

For kids in school, summer is typically spent catching up on reading lists and assigned homework between hours spent at the swimming pool and with friends at summer camp (not necessarily in that order). But many professionals working in the entertainment industry—whether as producers, journalists, actors, or producers—spent this summer learning about Latino moviegoers. (That’s largely thanks to an exclusive series on Hispanic film consumers published at TheWrap.)

From the growing importance of Hispanic females at the box office to the expanding movie preferences of Latino film fans, here are a few essential—takeaways about Hispanics that got Hollywood’s attention this summer.

1. Hispanic women over age 25 are the most frequent moviegoers. Summer films like Transformers: Age of Extinction, Godzilla and Captain America: The Winter Soldier are meant to capitalize on the appetites of young, mostly male audiences, but it turns out that Latina movie lovers headed to the movies more this summer often than any other age or ethnic group. According to a study conducted for The Wrap by market research firm C4, about 20 percent of Hispanic women watched this summer’s major releases—and in every case except for The Fault in Our Stars, those buying movie tickets were over the age of 25.

2. Hispanic audiences go to movies of all genres. Horror and family flicks used to be considered standard money makers among Latino audiences (the smash success of Guillermo del Toro’s Mama and the Lego movie were largely driven by Hispanic audiences). This summer, hits like 22 Jump Street (a comedy), Fault in Our Stars (a drama) and Edge of Tomorrow (a thriller) were all heavily attended by Latinos, who made up at least 20 percent of the opening week audience—proving that just like in political elections, their preferences aren’t monolithic.

3. Twenty is a magic number. When it comes to Hispanic movie lovers, that is. According to Nielsen/Univision research conducted for The Wrap, Latino ticket buyers are now Hollywood’s most valuable audience, accounting for at least 20 percent of ticket sales opening weekend for the highest-grossing movies in May and June. “You don’t have a major hit without Hispanic moviegoers,” Chris Aronson, Fox’s president of domestic distribution, told TheWrap.

And consider this: Latinos purchased 25 percent of the tickets sold in 2013 in the U.S. though they account for just 17 percent of the U.S. population, according to a study published by the Motion Picture Association of America last year. Those statistics are the driving force for a growing number of creative agencies that specialize in helping studios market films to Hispanic moviegoers, who tailor media campaigns to appeal to an audience that cares deeply about culture, family-friendly content, and Spanish-language media.

4. Tacos and margaritas now mean big money for cinemas. It’s no secret that overpriced popcorn and Big Gulp-sized drinks earn major dollars for movie theaters, but a diversified menu at the concession stand is a big draw for Latino moviegoers. Fajitas, chicken wraps, tacos, dishes spiced with chipotle peppers, and specialty cocktails are now available at AMC’s 15 dine-in theaters nationwide, part of an industry-wide push for diverse dining choices and alcohol offerings that aims to capitalize on the fact that Hispanic moviegoers overindex in their purchase of concessions and alcohol.

“Our dine-in theaters, while not specifically targeting a certain demo, have a seasonal menu that would line up closer to a Hispanic moviegoing population in terms of food,” AMC spokesman Ryan Noonan explained to TheWrap.

5. The Latino presence in film—both in front of the camera and behind the scenes—remains alarmingly low. Despite the presence of Latinos in summer films like like Sex Tape (starring Cuban-American actress Cameron Diaz) and The Purge: Anarchy (with its predominantly Latino cast), there are “fewer Latino lead actors in the entertainment industry today, than there were seventy years ago,” a recent study by the Columbia University Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race shows.

And it gets worse: When Latinos are on camera, they are typically portrayed in roles that lean heavily on stereotypes—Latinos are often cast as criminals, law enforcers, cheap labor, and hypersexualized beings, the study found. And according to the study, when it comes to behind-the-scenes talent, Hispanics account for just 2.3 percent of movie directors, about 2 percent of producers, and 6 percent of writers.

“The success of a few Latino stars has created a widespread perception that media diversity in the U.S. is significantly improving,” said Frances Negrón-Muntaner, director of Columbia’s Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race and the study’s lead researcher in a statement. “But our findings indicate that, in some ways, it is getting worse.”

Latest Videos in Movies

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP