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Read Martin Scorsese's passionate defense of Kodak film

On the heels of Kodak’s decision to continue its production of film stock after finalizing a deal with major Hollywood studios just last week, the venerable Martin Scorsese issued a heartfelt statement in support of the move, writing: “This news is a positive step towards preserving film, the art form we love.”

As the Chair of The Film Foundation, Scorsese recognizes the advantages of HD and the realities of modern movie-making while still enthusiastically embracing the importance of film, not only as a “building block” of the art form but also as something that continues to inform the current aesthetics of movies. “Film is still the best and only time-proven way to preserve movies,” he writes. “We have no assurance that digital informaton (sic) will last, but we know that film will, if properly stored and cared for.”

Read his full statement below.

We have many names for what we do – cinema, movies, motion pictures. And…film. We’re called directors, but more often we’re called filmmakers. Filmmakers. I’m not suggesting that we ignore the obvious: HD isn’t coming, it’s here. The advantages are numerous: the cameras are lighter, it’s much easier to shoot at night, we have many more means at our disposal for altering and perfecting our images. And, the cameras are more affordable: films really can be made now for very little money. Even those of us still shooting on film finish in HD, and our movies are projected in HD. So, we could easily agree that the future is here, that film is cumbersome and imperfect and difficult to transport and prone to wear and decay, and that it’s time to forget the past and say goodbye – really, that could be easily done. Too easily. READ FULL STORY

Awesome zombie movie 'The Battery' now has a making-of doc

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How do you make one of the best low-budget horror movies of the past few years? With a lot of booze and no underwear. At least, that’s what the folks responsible for zombie film The Battery claim in the trailer for a making-of documentary—which will be included among the bonus extras when Scream Factory releases the film on Blu-ray and DVD, September 16.

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Will Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon get romantic in 'The Trip to Italy'?

In the 2011 comedy The Trip, British funnymen Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon—playing themselves—entertainingly bickered their way around the north of England while reviewing restaurants for U.K. newspaper The Observer. The pair have now reteamed for a second course of quips, face-stuffing, and Michael Caine impersonations in the self-explanatory sequel The Trip to Italy.

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'Sin City: A Dame to Kill For' trailer too sexy for ABC

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First, Eva Green was too sexy in the poster for Sin City: A Dame to Kill For. Now she’s apparently too sexy in the movie’s trailer.

According to Page Six, which first reported the news, ABC felt that the white robe Green wears in the clip—making the actress appear nearly naked—was too sheer for TV. It’s a similar complaint to the one the MPAA made with Green’s poster image, in which she wears the same white robe. As a result, the poster was reworked.

It’s yet to be seen if Dimension Films will rework the footage to make the trailer more television-friendly. READ FULL STORY

Box office preview: 'Guardians of the Galaxy' aims for a cosmic debut

The motley crew of rebels and mercenaries in Guardians of the Galaxy make their theatrical debut this weekend, and all signs point to a stellar opening. They might not be the most popular or well-known Marvel characters, but strong reviews and an even stronger marketing campaign have helped to drum up interest for these unlikely superheroes, which include an earthling (Chris Pratt), a talking raccoon (Bradley Cooper), and a tree (Vin Diesel). As the widest August release in history with a 4,080 screen launch, Guardians is tracking at $65 million, but many analysts think that it has the potential to earn much more.

The James Brown biopic Get On Up, starring Chadwick Boseman as the Hardest Working Man in Show Business, opens in 2,466 theaters this weekend, providing some much-needed alternative programming in this summer of superheroes and sequels.

Here’s how things might play out.

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Jon Stewart's 'Rosewater' gets a November release date

Mark your calendars for Nov. 7 and don’t forget to record The Daily Show: Open Road Films announced Thursday that it would release Jon Stewart’s directorial debut Rosewater in select theaters on the awards-friendly November date opposite wide-releases Interstellar and Big Hero 6.

The Iranian political drama starring Gael Garcia Bernal as a BBC journalist who was arrested while covering an election protest in Iran and subsequently imprisoned and tortured over the next 118 days is based on Maziar Bahari and Aimee Molloy’s best-selling memoir Then They Came for Me: A Family’s Story of Love, Captivity and Survival. Open Road Films acquired the adaptation at at the Cannes Film Festival and plans to premiere it at the Toronto Film Festival in September.

Stewart took a three-month hiatus from hosting The Daily Show to work on the project. He had a longstanding relationship with the imprisoned journalist: Stewart frequently covered Bahari’s imprisonment, and Bahari appeared on the show after he was released from prison.

How much of 'Dog Day Afternoon' is a true story? Find out in 'The Dog'

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On August 22, 1972, a man named John Wojtowicz attempted to rob a bank in Brooklyn to pay for his lover’s sex-change operation—at least, that is what has been long believed. The bungled heist would later inspire Sidney Lumet’s classic 1975 film Dog Day Afternoon, which starred Al Pacino as “Sonny Wortzik” and John Cazale as his fellow robber, Sal. Now, four decades on, Allison Berg and Frank Keraudren have made The Dog, a documentary which relates the real, incredible true story of that August day, and what happened to Wojtowicz afterwards.

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'Bending the Light' director Michael Apted on the future of the camera

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Veteran director Michael Apted investigates the art of the lens in his new documentary Bending the Light, which takes audiences inside a lens-making factory to explore the relationship between artists and their tools. Apted spoke to EW about the film (set to premiere at the Traverse City Film Festival on Aug. 3), the challenges of being afforded a “rare glimpse” inside an otherwise secure factory, the cultural influences of his Up series, and whether or not he thinks it might have inspired Richard Linklater’s Boyhood.

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Nat Wolff on how 'Paper Towns' is sort of like 'The Godfather'

The first time Nat Wolff heard about John Green’s Paper Towns, he was on the set of another John Green adaptation, The Fault In Our Stars. It was then that producer Wyck Godfrey suggested that Wolff give Paper Towns a read. As Wolff puts it, Godfrey didn’t quite wink at him, but “there was something behind” the suggestion. So Wolff quickly read the book, loved it, and four months later, picked up his phone just in time to be offered the lead role of Quentin “Q” Jacobsen in a Paper Towns film adaptation. According to Wolff, he said yes before they could even finish making the offer.

“It’s just such a soulful character and a funny book. I’m excited,” Wolff says. And yet what might be most exciting is the fact that screenwriters Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber knew about Wolff before they started writing the script, which allowed them, for the first time in their careers, to write for a specific actor. “First of all, that is like the most exciting compliment I’ve ever gotten because those guys are such good writers. The fact that I’m the first actor that they’re writing for is really just unbelievable,” Wolff says. READ FULL STORY

Director Brian Trenchard-Smith talks John Cusack comedy-thriller 'Drive Hard'

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Brian Trenchard-Smith has been a director for 40 years and has made around the same amount of movies, from 1975’s George Lazenby-featuring action film The Man from Hong Kong through 1986’s cult film Dead End Drive-In to last year’s straight-to-DVD thriller Absolute Deception, which starred Cuba Gooding Jr. “I’ve never met a green-light I didn’t like,” chuckles the urbane auteur.

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