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Tag: New York Film Festival (1-10 of 11)

Paul Thomas Anderson's 'Inherent Vice' to debut at New York festival

Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice, based on Thomas Pynchon’s 2009 crime novel, will debut at the New York Film Festival this October. The film, which reunites the director with Joaquin Phoenix (The Master) and also stars Josh Brolin, Reese Witherspoon, Owen Wilson, and Benicio Del Toro, is scheduled to open in theaters on Dec. 12. READ FULL STORY

'Gone Girl' to open New York Film Festival

Gone Girl, David Fincher’s adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s best-selling mystery thriller, will open the 52nd New York Film Festival, as first reported by Variety.

The movie stars Ben Affleck as a man who may have killed his missing wife (Rosamund Pike) after they retreat to his hometown in Missouri, following professional setbacks in New York City. Former EW TV critic Flynn wrote the screenplay, and the cast also includes Neil Patrick Harris, Tyler Perry, Patrick Fugit, and Casey Wilson. READ FULL STORY

On the scene with Spike Jonze, Joaquin Phoenix, Rooney Mara, and more at the premiere of 'Her'

The New York Film Festival screened Spike Jonze’s Her — his first solo writing feature — on its closing night, Oct. 12. Jonze, along with cast members Joaquin Phoenix, Amy Adams, Rooney Mara, and Olivia Wilde, arrived on the red carpet at Alice Tully Hall to celebrate the film’s world premiere.

The movie centers on Phoenix’s Theodore Twombly, a lonely, big-hearted man who falls in love with his Siri-like operating system “Samantha” (smokily voiced by Scarlett Johansson) while coping with his recent divorce. Set in a futuristic version of Los Angeles, Theodore works as a ghost writer for BeautifulHandwrittenLetters.com, dictating heartfelt missives from loved ones who can’t string the words together themselves. Sensitive and reclusive, he finds fulfillment through his complicated relationship with “Samantha.”

For director Jonze, the premiere was a special homecoming. “The New York Film Festival means a lot to me,” Jonze said before the screening. “This is where I got to premiere my first film, Being John Malkovich.” Accompanied by his family and most of his cast — except Johansson, who “is in the ether with us as she is in the movie,” he said — Jonze presented his highly anticipated film to a full house.

Though Phoenix showed up to the premiere with Jonze, the elusive actor didn’t stop for comments on the red carpet, instead racing inside early. But Mara, who plays a pivotal, albeit small, role as Theodore’s ex-wife, gamely talked about her part and how Theodore’s lengthy, but failed relationship with her character drives his need. “You see our relationship unfold,” Mara told EW. “We’ve been together many, many years, and you see all the stages of it.”

In fact, Jonze was reluctant to cast Mara as Theodore’s heartbreak because she seemed too young for Phoenix. “Joaquin is older than me, but he feels kind of young, he has a young spirit,” Mara said. “When I read the script, it was just so powerful, I loved it so much, so even though Spike thought I was too young, I went after it and convinced him to hire me.”

Kent Jones, the festival’s director of programming, echoed Mara while introducing Her: “[Spike] made a film that, when we saw it, we instantly fell in love with,” he said. Jones added that the selection committee wanted the film to close the festival because it mixed lighthearted humor with deeply haunting themes of human emotion, loneliness, and melancholy.

And with the diverse subject matter covered in Her, Mara said, it’s tough to pinpoint just one lesson from Theodore’s relationships.

“There’s so many thought-provoking ideas, and I don’t think there’s one thing to take away from it,” the actress said, shaking her head. “Every day while shooting it, I would drive home and have a million things running through my head about relationships, about everything; I think that’s kind of what happens when you see the film as well.”

Her opens in select theaters Dec. 18 and nationwide Jan. 10, 2014.

'12 Years a Slave' has special homecoming at New York Film Festival

12 Years a Slave premiered at Telluride and was crowned the presumptive Oscar frontrunner in Toronto, but its screening at the New York Film Festival last night was a special sort of homecoming. The movie, based on an 1853 memoir, tells the story of a free black New Yorker from Saratoga named Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor) who is kidnapped and trafficked into Southern slavery, and some of Northup’s descendants came to Manhattan from upstate to view the film with the Lincoln Center audience.

Since Toronto, director Steve McQueen’s movie has been celebrated as “slavery’s Schindler’s List,” the most unflinching and intimate study of our country’s most shameful sin. While Roots was a huge cultural television event in the 1970s and Quentin Tarantino had his own stylistic take on slavery in Django Unchained, few Hollywood films had put slavery under the microscope. “It’s obviously a very difficult historical moment that happened in America — hugely shameful, hugely painful,” McQueen said after the screening. “Previously [in Hollywood], obviously it was very very difficult and it was stuck somehow. But with the situation of Trayvon Martin, with having the first black president, the 150th anniversary of the abolition of slavery, 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, it’s created this kind of perfect storm where there’s a thirst to sort of reconnect with that past, to see where one’s going, and to see where one’s at.” READ FULL STORY

On the scene with Ben Stiller, Adam Scott, Kristen Wiig, and more at 'The Secret Life of Walter Mitty' NYFF premiere

The Secret Life of Walter Mitty made its world premiere as the New York Film Festival’s Centerpiece Gala Presentation on Saturday, Oct. 5. Directed by Ben Stiller, the film stars the actor in the titular role of a man with a penchant for “zoning out,” who goes on a fantastical journey to save his job at Life magazine along with the job of the woman of his dreams (Kristen Wiig). Stiller and the cast, including Wiig, Adam Scott, and Patton Oswalt, came out to celebrate the film’s premiere screening at Alice Tully Hall.

For producer John Goldwyn, the long road to a Secret Life of Walter Mitty remake started with Pursuit of Happyness scribe Stuart Conrad’s script. “In every other version, the script skewed closely to the original film, and his didn’t,” said Goldwyn, whose legendary grandfather produced the 1947 musical-comedy version. The modern Mitty is now less of a hapless daydreamer and more of a man who takes it upon himself to step out of his head and into real life. “It gave the character clarity. That’s what got Ben on board, Fox on board, got the thing moving down the track,” added Goldwyn.

Said Stiller, “We just wanted to honor the material and tell the story pretty simply. But I think there’s a lot beneath the surface in the Walter character, like the idea of what people have underneath. That’s something everybody in the cast related to.”

Adrian Martinez, who plays Hernando, Walter’s co-worker at Life magazine, marveled at Stiller’s work ethic. “I can’t even imagine directing a film of this size and performing and producing and being so conscientious of every detail and staying present with his fellow actors in every scene,” he said.

Scott, for his part, relished the chance to play a bearded baddie who’s heading a downsizing team at Life. (He currently stars as supportive husband and all-around good guy Ben Wyatt on Parks and Recreation.) “I really love A-holes,” said Scott. “I love watching them in real life, and I love watching pretend ones in movies. Heady s—heads are some of my favorite fake people to watch. I want to keep them out of my life, but I love watching them.”

Oswalt, who is featured in an undisclosed role (“I’m totally not being coy: Ben Stiller told me I can’t talk about it”), and newcomer Alex Anfanger, who plays one of Scott’s cronies, shared where they go in their minds whenever they “zone out.” Anfanger said, “I dream about what it would be like if I died. That’s a really morbid thing to say.” He quickly added, “It’s at least an epic, awesome death.”

Oswalt said his own daydreams involve imagining the continuation of scenes in movies. “I really would love to be Jerry Stiller, oddly enough, in The Taking of Pelham One Two Three when he’s standing next to Walter Matthau when the last robber sneezes and gives it away,” he said. “Matthau just puts his head back into the room like, ‘You just — Dude.’ Then they freeze it because they got him, but what happens [next]?”

Stiller’s wife, actress Christine Taylor shared a tidbit about a dream Stiller fans are hoping to see come true. When asked about the long-anticipated sequel to Zoolander, Taylor said, “Zoolander 2, you know, everyone wants to make it,” adding with a shrug, “There’s a script!”

The Secret Life of Walter Mitty opens nationwide on Dec. 25.

Cate Blanchett calls 'Blue Jasmine' her favorite role, gives hints about Terrence Malick film

If Cate Blanchett had a “gun to [her] head,” she would choose her recent turn in Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine, as her favorite movie role.

Blanchett plays a fallen socialite at the brink of her sanity. The Australian actress called it the “culmination of my work on the theater and my work in the film,” when asked by an audience member at the New York Film Festival tribute for her last night. READ FULL STORY

Report: Spielberg's 'Lincoln' to show at New York Film Festival

Lincoln.jpg

Attendees of the New York Film Festival, which started Sept. 28 and runs through Oct. 14, may very well get an early look at Steven Spielberg’s highly anticipated presidential biopic Lincoln next Monday, reports Deadline Hollywood.

A spokesperson for Walt Disney Studios tells EW the studio neither confirms nor denies Lincoln showing at the NY fest. Sources say, however, that if the movie DID show, it would be an early, unfinished version. The American Film Institute already confirmed last month that the ambitious biopic, starring stately Daniel Day-Lewis as bearded, stately 16th U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, would have its official world premiere at the closing night gala of AFI Fest 2012 on Nov. 8. Calls to the New York Film Festival were not immediately returned.

A strategically timed new trailer for Lincoln debuted just after Wednesday night’s first presidential debate between Republican candidate Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama, ramping up enthusiasm for the political flick. The movie opens nationwide Nov. 16.

For more film news

Read more:
‘Lincoln’ trailer: Debate followed by new look at Daniel Day-Lewis epic — VIDEO
‘Lincoln’ world premiere to close AFI Fest

New York Film Festival main slate includes films starring Bill Murray, Christina Hendricks, Rachel McAdams, Noomi Rapace

The New York Film Festival announced its full slate of films on Thursday, a line up of 32 titles that largely serves as a catch-all compendium of standouts from other international festivals like Cannes, Berlin, Venice, and Toronto.

Along with the previously announced opening night film (Ang Lee’s Life of Pi), centerpiece gala (David Chase’s Not Fade Away), and closing night film (Robert Zemeckis’ Flight) — all world premieres — the highlights of the festival include: Hyde Park on Hudson, starring Bill Murray as President Franklin D. Roosevelt; Ginger and Rosa, starring Elle Fanning as a girl growing up in 1962 London with unhappy-if-gorgeous parents (Christina Hendricks and Allesandro Nivola); Passion, Brian De Palma’s heightened noir about an ad exec (Rachel McAdams) and her assistant (Noomi Rapace); and Amour, the winner of the Palme d’Or at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival.

The festival runs from Sept. 28 through Oct. 14 at Lincoln Center. Check out the full list of films below: READ FULL STORY

'Sopranos' creator David Chase bringing feature directing debut to New York Film Festival

David Chase, the celebrated creator of HBO’s The Sopranos, will premiere his feature film directing debut Not Fade Away as the centerpiece gala screening at the 50th New York Film Festival, which runs from Sept. 28 through Oct. 14.

Set in New Jersey in 1964, the film chronicles a group of young friends who decide to start a rock band. While the cast is largely made up of fresh faces (John Magaro, Jack Huston, Will Brill, Bella Heathcote), Chase did keep some of his film all in the family, so to speak: James Gandolfini has a supporting role (along with Brad Garrett and Christopher McDonald), and Steven Van Zandt produced the soundtrack.

Not Fade Away begins its platform release in theaters on Dec. 21, 2012.

Read more:
‘Life of Pi’ to open New York Film Festival
‘Flight’ to close New York Film Festival

'Life of Pi' to open New York Film Festival

life-of-pi

Life of Pi, director Ang Lee’s 3-D adaptation of Yann Martel’s bestselling novel about a young man (newcomer Suraj Sharma) lost at sea with a Bengal tiger, will open the 50th New York Film Festival, the Film Society of Lincoln Center announced Monday. The premiere on Sept. 28 will be well in advance of the film’s nationwide Nov. 21 debut, giving the film a jump start on awards season.

READ FULL STORY

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