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Tag: Noah (1-10 of 20)

Box office preview: Captain America takes on 'Rio 2,' 'Oculus,' and 'Draft Day'

Last week, Captain America flew into competition-free skies and collected a cool $95 million across its first three days in theaters. The Marvel super-sequel won’t be so lucky in week two, as it goes up against three vastly different genres (a sports pic, a horror film, and an animated romp), but The Winter Soldier will still dominate the weekend.

Here’s how things might play out: READ FULL STORY

Box office report: 'Captain America' soars with $96.2 million weekend

 

Captain America: The Winter Soldier is yet another piece of evidence that Marvel’s formula for its behemoth superhero film franchise is exactly what audiences want.

The sequel to the 2011 original starring Chris Evans as the Super Soldier grossed an estimated $96.2 million this opening weekend, setting a record for best April opening and earning an “A” CinemaScore from its audiences. READ FULL STORY

Box office update: 'Captain America' supersizes Friday's box office with $37 million

Captain America: The Winter Soldier is proving that a big shield is enough to conquer the box office, pulling in an estimated $37 million Friday night. The PG-13 film from Joe and Anthony Russo is already outpacing 2011’s original Captain America, which earned $25.7 million its first full day in release. The movie has also already nabbed $75 million from its international release and could get close to $100 million here in North America. READ FULL STORY

Box office preview: How high will Marvel's 'Captain America: The Winter Soldier' fly?

Comic book season is upon us, and there’s no turning back.

Disney and Marvel’s Captain America: The Winter Soldier is the (lucky?) first one out of the gates. As has become standard for Marvel releases, the question is not whether it will open at No. 1 (there aren’t even any other movies opening wide this weekend!), but just where it will fall on the golden brand’s sliding scale of successes and super-successes. Modern Marvel cinematic universe adaptations have opened anywhere from $65 million (Captain America: The First Avenger) to $207 million (The Avengers).

Here’s how things might play out, and let us know your predictions in the comments. READ FULL STORY

Russell Crowe meets Anglican leader after 'Noah' premiere

The pope said no but the leader of the world’s Anglicans was happy to meet Russell Crowe, star of watery Biblical epic NoahCrowe was denied a private audience with Pope Francis when he was promoting the movie in Rome last month.

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Box office report: 'Noah' wreaks Old Testament havoc on its competitors

Russell Crowe’s grungy beard — presumably as well as other elements of Noah — drew in $44 million this weekend, perching it atop a Mount Ararat of box office receipts with a moderately impressive sum by any measurement (including cubits). Darren Aronofsky’s Biblical bonanza took the No. 1 spot, knocking all the films from last week’s Top 5 down one slot. The theologically loose adaptation fared better than the last time Crowe went gallivanting around in a tunic, in 2010’s Robin Hood. (That period epic only made $36 million in its first weekend.) However, there wasn’t exactly a rainbow at the end of the storm, considering audiences gave Noah a “C” CinemaScore rating.

The Divergent Games: City of Bones — er, Divergent — couldn’t quite muster enough YA fandom or non-reader interest to push its to-date take over the $100 million mark. The fantasy drama sits comfortably in a distant second with $26.5 million for the weekend, making for a grand total of $95.3 million. With a reported budget of $85 million, this certainly isn’t a dystopian scenario for the proposed trilogy, but it is less than half of what both films in The Hunger Games series had made by the end of their second weekends. READ FULL STORY

Box office update: 'Noah' floats with $15.2 million on Friday

Darren Aronofsky’s diluvian epic Noah attracted something between a trickle and a flood of moviegoers on Friday, earning the film $15.2 million in its first day of release. While Noah is an adaptation of the original disaster story, in which God plays Roland Emmerich and destroys pretty much everything in sight, the number puts Noah‘s draw closer to that of historical epics like star Russell Crowe’s Robin Hood than any of Emmerich’s big-budget catastrophe porn. It’s unclear whether the film managed to get Christian audiences (who made last week’s God’s Not Dead a sleeper hit) marching two-by-two into the cinemaplex or if news that Aronofsky was playing fast and loose with Old Testament mythology had kept them at bay.

Meanwhile, Divergent made $8.1 million on its second Friday, dropping a modest 64 percent. The hopeful YA franchise may not diverge too much in tone from its allegorical dystopian forebear The Hunger Games, but the numbers do: At this point, Divergent has made $76.9 million, whereas the first film adapted from Suzanne Collins’ trilogy had already taken in $208.6 million over nearly the exact same calendar days. Of course, $76.9 million in a week and a day is no small potatoes. It’s just not freakishly large genetically modified potatoes, either.

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Critical mass: Smooth sailing or angry seas for 'Noah'?

Darren Aronofsky’s bold biblical epic Noah is sure to get different types of people talking for different reasons. The Black Swan director faithfully follows the message of the slim biblical text in the Book of Genesis, but he fills the gaps with spectacular CG effects, Tolkien-esque creatures, and a daring 21st-century point of view on evolution and environmentalism. Some parts of the world have already blanched at the film, presumably for the liberties Aronofsky and co-writer Ari Handel take with the sacred tale, but secular audiences and even some religious types might find themselves simply thinking… “Cool.” READ FULL STORY

Box office preview: Can 'Noah' build an opening of biblical proportions?

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After months of hand wringing and controversy, Darren Aronofsky’s CGI-happy Noah finally hits theaters this weekend.

Boasting an all-star cast, a patina of prestige and a wide release, there’s no doubt that the epic will open in first place. But coming on the heels of last weekend’s surprise success story God’s Not Dead, the Christian film that opened in fourth place at $9.2 million from just 780 screens, the question of the weekend is whether faith-based audiences will turn out to see just what Aronofsky has done with the story.

This weekend also provides a lot of interesting fodder to analyze, including Divergent‘s ability to hold its own after a robust, fan-driven opening weekend, whether or not The Grand Budapest Hotel‘s limited-release triumphs will translate into a mainstream hit, and how successful Pantelion’s grassroots Cesar Chavez marketing will be when it comes to getting audiences in the theaters.

Here’s how things might play out. READ FULL STORY

'Noah': Russell Crowe's planned papal visit nixed

In the much-hyped build-up to Passion of the Christ in 2004, Mel Gibson screened the polarizing film for Pope John Paul II, who may or may not have endorsed it by saying, “It is as it was.” The Pope later met with actor Jim Caviezel and blessed him in a priceless photo op that helped promote the movie.

Paramount and the team behind Noah were likely hoping for a similar boost this week, with the film having its Italian premiere on Tuesday. Russell Crowe, who plays the Bible figure as action-hero, had been tweeting Pope Francis in recent weeks, urging him to screen Darren Aronofsky’s $130 million movie about the great flood. It’s unclear whether the pontiff has seen the film, but a planned meeting between the film’s star and Francis was canceled after the Vatican reportedly grew concerned that Crowe’s celebrity would turn the Pope’s dignified weekly general-audience meet-and-greet into a media frenzy. According to the Hollywood Reporter, Paramount dropped its plan once news of Crowe’s possible appearance became public.

Though it must feel like a missed opportunity for the film, Crowe can take solace in knowing that the Vatican apparently considers him a bigger star than Caviezel.

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