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Tag: Oscars (11-20 of 518)

John Travolta on Idina Menzel goof: 'I've been beating myself up all day'

 After John Travolta introduced Frozen singer Idina Menzel as “Adela Dazeem” during Sunday night’s Oscars telecast, the actor didn’t say anything about the incident for almost two days. Now he’s speaking out — and this time, he’s not leaving any room for a slip of the tongue. READ FULL STORY

Check out the first image from 'Human Centipede 3' -- EXCLUSIVE PHOTO

It has been two and a half long years since the release of the last Human Centipede film — or two and a half very short years, depending on how you feel about the infamous movies, in which people are attached together to form the titular monstrosity. Either way, Dutch writer/director and series overlord Tom Six is now preparing to unleash the third film in the franchise, the U.S.-shot Human Centipede 3 (Final Sequence). So what can horror fans expect from the final installment of this notoriously grotesque and much-parodied series?

READ FULL STORY

Oscars 2014: '12 Years a Slave' plans theatrical expansion following Best Picture win

Haven’t caught Best Picture winner 12 Years a Slave in theaters yet? You may be in luck.

Steve McQueen’s riveting drama has been in theaters for 20 weeks, but after Sunday’s big win, Fox Searchlight is planning to push it out to over 1,000 theaters this weekend.

It’s an unconventional move — especially considering the fact that the film will be available on DVD starting Tuesday — but there could be a market still hoping for the theatrical experience now that the Academy has anointed the film the best of the year (in addition to its wins for Best Supporting Actress and Best Screenplay). READ FULL STORY

Oscar analysis: '12 Years a Slave' breaks Academy's trend of playing it safe

Shoulda trusted the coin.

About two weeks ago, sitting in the office of EW assistant managing editor Sean Smith, we were discussing EW’s official Oscar predictions and mulling the reaction I was getting from many voters: Gravity was taking the lead in the tightest Best Picture race in years, and those who favored 12 Years a Slave seemed soft in their support.

For months, ever since the historical drama premiered at the Toronto film festival, it was at the top of my predictions list — a crushing, emotionally resonant film that addressed how we perceive and treat those who appear to be different from ourselves. But it was also an uncompromising film, full of brutality that was often difficult to watch, and we all know the Academy Awards have compromised a lot in the past.

So I switched our pick toward Gravity, which was garnering a groundswell of support in other categories, and seemed to be the popular, more accessible favorite. The graphics people were alerted to make a last-minute adjustment, and I stayed with that through the final round of guessing. It was close enough to give me a stomachache. (Believe it or not, the predictions truly are made based on our best assessment of voters. There’s no advocacy or favoritism. The cold, hard pragmatism of wanting to be right guides those choices.)

The call was made: Gravity it would be, by a hair. But then I flipped a quarter, and Sean called it: Tails, it would be 12 Years a Slave.

Again — shoulda trusted the coin. READ FULL STORY

Oscars 2014 backstage: What the winners didn't say on TV

Sunday night’s Oscar winners had plenty to say onstage (Best Actor champ Matthew McConaughey even snuck in an “Alright, alright, alright”), but there’s always more to express after winning the biggest award in film. That’s where the backstage press room comes in, and EW was there to collect all the best moments and bons mots you didn’t see on TV.

For some, holding a golden statuette put them in a playful mood, including Jared Leto (Best Supporting Actor for Dallas Buyers Club), who passed his new hardware around the press room so everyone could share in his victory, and Best Actress winner Cate Blanchett (Blue Jasmine), who joked that she was being auctioned off to the highest bidder in the room (“Only 86? I’m worth a little bit more than that!”). Others were reflective, including Best Supporting Actress winner Lupita Nyong’o (12 Years a Slave): “What I’ve learned from myself is I don’t have to be anybody else. Myself is good enough.”

Read on for more from behind the scenes: READ FULL STORY

Oscars 2014: Cate Blanchett wins Best Actress

Cate Blanchett was named Best Actress at the Oscars earlier tonight for her performance in Blue Jasmine. She beat Amy Adams, Sandra Bullock, Judi Dench, and Meryl Streep.

“Thank you, Mr. Day-Lewis,” Blanchett said to Daniel Day-Lewis who presented the award to her. “From you, it exacerbates this honor and blows it right out of the ballpark. “

In her speech, Blanchett also touched on the need for more films starring women. “[To the people who think] films with women at the center are niche. They are not….In fact, they earn money. The world is round, people!” Blanchett also thanked Blue Jasmine director Woody Allen.

Blanchett won an Oscar once before, for her performance in The Aviator. 

'12 Years a Slave' wins Best Picture at the 2014 Oscars

Although Gravity dominated the 2014 Oscars, soaking up awards in the technical categories, it could not take home the top prize. As anticipated by many Oscar prognosticators, there was a somewhat rare Best Director/Best Picture split: Alfonso Cuaron took home Best Director, but it was 12 Years a Slave that won Best Picture. (The true-life slavery epic also won Best Supporting Actress and Best Adapted Screenplay.)

Producer Brad Pitt gave a few brief remarks but quickly gave way to 12 Years director Steve McQueen, who closed his speech on a powerful note. “This is the most important legacy of Solomon Northup,” he said. “I dedicate this award to all the people who have endured slavery, and the 21 million people who still suffer slavery today.” He then turned around and, literally, jumped for joy.

Oscars 2014: Matthew McConaughey wins Best Actor

First-time nominee Matthew McConaughey won the Oscar for Best Actor for his performance as Ron Woodroof in Dallas Buyers Club, the role for which he lost a great amount of weight to play a man who battled AIDS for seven years after being told he had only 30 days to live. McConaughey beat out fellow nominees Christian Bale, Bruce Dern, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Chiwetel Ejiofor.

After a prolonged kiss from his wife, Camila Alves, and a kiss on the cheek from DiCaprio, McConaughey took the stage to thank the 6,000 members of the Academy, as well as the other nominees. He then spoke about the three things that he needs each day: Something to look up to, something to look forward to, and someone to chase. McConaughey continued on to thank God, his father — who’s dancing in his underwear up in heaven with some gumbo — his mother, and his wife and kids, who are “the four people in my life that I want to make the most proud of me.” Through tear-filled eyes, McConaughey ended by talking about his “someone to chase.” He spoke about continuing to strive to be his own hero, 10 years at a time.

He wrapped things up with a little “Alright, alright, alright,” and his life motto: “Just keep living.”

 

Oscars 2014: Alfonso Cuaron wins Best Director

Gravity‘s sweep of the 86th Annual Academy Awards continues: The Academy awarded Alfonso Cuarón a Best Director statuette, making him the first Mexican person ever to win this category. His win comes as the culmination of a long, arduous filmmaking process; Gravity was in development for several years. “For many of us involved in this film, it was definitely a transformative experience,” Cuarón said in his acceptance speech. “And that was good, because it if it was not it would have been a waste of time.”

Cuarón also thanked the “wise guys at Warner Bros” before amending himself — “the wise people at Warner Bros” — and concluded his speech with a few words in Spanish.

Oscars 2014: Bill Murray pays touching tribute to Harold Ramis

Bill Murray, making a rare Oscar appearance less than a week after the death of Harold Ramis, made a poignant shout-out to his old friend while presenting the award for Best Cinematography. After announcing the nominees, Murray added, “Oh, we forgot one. Harold Ramis for Caddyshack, Ghostbusters, and Groundhog Day.”

The audience applauded warmly, Murray apologized — needlessly — for stealing the moment, and then the prize was awarded to Gravity‘s Emmanuel Lubezki, who won for the first time after six nominations.

Murray and Ramis knew each other before they were famous, coming up together in the Chicago comedy scene and then working together in New York. Ramis would co-write Animal House, and then join Murray behind the scenes of Meatballs, Caddyshack, and Stripes, the latter two which he directed. They co-starred in Ghostbusters, and then made Groundhog Day together in 1993. Ramis was never nominated for an Oscar, but his Groundhog Day script, which he co-wrote with Danny Rubin, won the BAFTA Award.

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