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'12 Years a Slave' wins Best Picture at the 2014 Oscars

Although Gravity dominated the 2014 Oscars, soaking up awards in the technical categories, it could not take home the top prize. As anticipated by many Oscar prognosticators, there was a somewhat rare Best Director/Best Picture split: Alfonso Cuaron took home Best Director, but it was 12 Years a Slave that won Best Picture. (The true-life slavery epic also won Best Supporting Actress and Best Adapted Screenplay.)

Producer Brad Pitt gave a few brief remarks but quickly gave way to 12 Years director Steve McQueen, who closed his speech on a powerful note. “This is the most important legacy of Solomon Northup,” he said. “I dedicate this award to all the people who have endured slavery, and the 21 million people who still suffer slavery today.” He then turned around and, literally, jumped for joy.

Oscars 2014: Matthew McConaughey wins Best Actor

First-time nominee Matthew McConaughey won the Oscar for Best Actor for his performance as Ron Woodroof in Dallas Buyers Club, the role for which he lost a great amount of weight to play a man who battled AIDS for seven years after being told he had only 30 days to live. McConaughey beat out fellow nominees Christian Bale, Bruce Dern, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Chiwetel Ejiofor.

After a prolonged kiss from his wife, Camila Alves, and a kiss on the cheek from DiCaprio, McConaughey took the stage to thank the 6,000 members of the Academy, as well as the other nominees. He then spoke about the three things that he needs each day: Something to look up to, something to look forward to, and someone to chase. McConaughey continued on to thank God, his father — who’s dancing in his underwear up in heaven with some gumbo — his mother, and his wife and kids, who are “the four people in my life that I want to make the most proud of me.” Through tear-filled eyes, McConaughey ended by talking about his “someone to chase.” He spoke about continuing to strive to be his own hero, 10 years at a time.

He wrapped things up with a little “Alright, alright, alright,” and his life motto: “Just keep living.”

 

Oscars 2014: Alfonso Cuaron wins Best Director

Gravity‘s sweep of the 86th Annual Academy Awards continues: The Academy awarded Alfonso Cuarón a Best Director statuette, making him the first Mexican person ever to win this category. His win comes as the culmination of a long, arduous filmmaking process; Gravity was in development for several years. “For many of us involved in this film, it was definitely a transformative experience,” Cuarón said in his acceptance speech. “And that was good, because it if it was not it would have been a waste of time.”

Cuarón also thanked the “wise guys at Warner Bros” before amending himself — “the wise people at Warner Bros” — and concluded his speech with a few words in Spanish.

Oscars 2014: Bill Murray pays touching tribute to Harold Ramis

Bill Murray, making a rare Oscar appearance less than a week after the death of Harold Ramis, made a poignant shout-out to his old friend while presenting the award for Best Cinematography. After announcing the nominees, Murray added, “Oh, we forgot one. Harold Ramis for Caddyshack, Ghostbusters, and Groundhog Day.”

The audience applauded warmly, Murray apologized — needlessly — for stealing the moment, and then the prize was awarded to Gravity‘s Emmanuel Lubezki, who won for the first time after six nominations.

Murray and Ramis knew each other before they were famous, coming up together in the Chicago comedy scene and then working together in New York. Ramis would co-write Animal House, and then join Murray behind the scenes of Meatballs, Caddyshack, and Stripes, the latter two which he directed. They co-starred in Ghostbusters, and then made Groundhog Day together in 1993. Ramis was never nominated for an Oscar, but his Groundhog Day script, which he co-wrote with Danny Rubin, won the BAFTA Award.

Oscars 2014: Lupita Nyong'o wins Best Supporting Actress

Lupita Nyong’o, costar of 12 Years a Slave, won the Best Supporting Actress Oscar at the 86th Annual Academy Awards. Eloquent as always, she thanked both her family and the Yale School of Drama for what they’ve taught her, saluted the spirit of Patsy (her role) and thanked Solomon Northup for telling his story as well as hers, and said that when she looks at the golden statue it will remind her that no matter where you’re from, your dreams are valid.

The film was the first for Nyong’o, who told EW on the BAFTAs red carpet that Ralph Fiennes is immensely proud of her success. She was a runner on the Kenyan shoot for his 2005 film The Constant Gardener and used to fret how much she was annoying him ferrying him back and forth to the set.

She’s currently in theaters in Non-Stop, the weekend’s No. 1 movie.

And just for fun, here’s a .gif of her win!

Jared Leto wins Best Supporting Actor at the 2014 Oscars

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Jared Leto won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for his role as a transgender AIDS patient in Dallas Buyers Club. In his first role in nearly six years, Leto dominated the pre-Oscar prizes and was a heavy favorite to win. Leto thanked his mother, who raised him and his older brother alone, and then spoke to the dreamers watching at home in such trouble spots as Ukraine and Venezuela. He closed with reminding the audience of the 36 million people who have lost the battle with AIDS and the millions of people who fight courageously every day to be different and to be themselves.

Oscars 2014: Watch a live-stream of the red carpet!

Oscar night brings all the biggest celebrities in all the best (and sometimes worst) outfits. Watch the stars arriving at the 86th annual Academy Awards below! READ FULL STORY

Oscars 2014: And the winners are ...

12 Years a Slave won the big prize of the night, but Gravity took home the most awards overall with seven.

Slave, the historical drama based on the true story of Solomon Northup, took home Best Picture, Best Supporting Actress (for Lupita Nyong’o), and Best Adapted Screenplay (for John Ridley).

Meanwhile, Gravity earned honors for Alfonso Cuaron (Best Director), Best Original Score, Best Film Editing, Best Cinematography, Best Sound Editing, Best Sound Mixing, and Best Visual Effects.

Including Nyong’o, the acting awards went as predicted, with Cate Blanchett (Blue Jasmine), Matthew McConaughey (Dallas Buyers Club), and Jared Leo (Dallas Buyers Club) won for Best Actress, Best Actor, and Best Supporting Actor, respectively.

Complete winners list below: READ FULL STORY

Independent Spirit Awards 2014: The winners list

The Independent Spirit Awards were handed out on the beach in Santa Monica, California, on Saturday, and 12 Years a Slave emerged the big winner, taking home five awards, including the top prize of Best Feature.

Dallas Buyers Club dominated the acting categories, with Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto both winning, while Cate Blanchett continued her apparent path to the Best Actress Oscar, collecting yet another prize for Blue Jasmine.

Read below for all the winners, and watch the show at 10 p.m ET on IFC: READ FULL STORY

Oscar Documentary Shorts: Meet 'The Lady in Number 6'

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Come Oscar season, all cinephiles are ready to campaign for their favorite film. Are you Team Gravity or Team 12 Years a Slave? Jennifer Lawrence or Lupita Nyong’o? While movie fans have likely seen all the big nominees by this point, there are smaller categories where even some film enthusiasts may not be as well-versed.  Leading up to the Oscars, EW will tell you all about one often-overlooked category: Best Documentary Short. Come back each day this week for a look at one of the nominees, and impress your Oscar party with your knowledge when the category appears on Sunday’s broadcast.

Today: The Lady in Number 6: Music Saved My Life, directed by Malcolm Clarke

The real surprise of The Lady in Number 6 might be that Alice Herz Sommer’s story hadn’t been told before. A London concert pianist and oldest living survivor of the Holocaust, the film easily could have been depressing, but the optimistic Sommer’s account of her long, extraordinary life instead is at times thrilling, incredible, cheery and miraculous. The fact that at 109 she was still able to recall so many historical events and was willing to share her experiences is something to behold.

Director Malcolm Clarke’s interview with EW took place last week. Unfortunately, this past weekend Sommers passed away at the age of 110 — an inevitability Clarke knew he was facing when filming.

“We had to move very quickly, Clarke explained. “Alice was not young when I met her, I think she was 107 when I met her. Any 107 year old, even if they’re very healthy, they are clearly closer to the end of their life than the beginning of their life and so we wanted to get  this woman on film while she was still healthy and sprightly and chipper. We did it as fast as we could. No one got paid, it was a labor of love for everyone, it was actually pretty much everyone who had worked on Prisoner of Paradise came back and gave their services, you know, gratis, so we could get the movie quickly and get her on film while she was still alive.”

Read on for more of EW’s Q&A with Clarke about the film. READ FULL STORY

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