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Tag: Owen Wilson (1-10 of 20)

'Are You Here' trailer: Owen Wilson and Zach Galifianakis go home again -- VIDEO

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Thanks to Mad Men, writer/director Matthew Weiner has become associated with 1960s — but he wanted to explore something different for his big-screen directing debut, Are You Here.

Starring Owen Wilson, Zach Galifianakis, and Amy Poehler, the film tells the story of two childhood best friends who travel home when Ben’s (Galifianakis) estranged father dies, only to discover that he’s actually inherited a ton of money. Once there, the friendship is tested thanks to complicated relationships with Ben’s sister Terry (Amy Poehler), among other problems.

“I love the movie Five Easy Pieces, which is really a movie about a man coming to terms with the same issues as in Are You Here,”  Weiner, who wrote and directed the film, told EW. “Structurally, I wanted to commit to telling a story that you wouldn’t know the ending to. That you would recognize it as reality but you would really have a plot that is as twisted as real life is.”

He added: “This is decidedly less glamorous than Mad Men. It’s definitely contemporary. It’s about what is ugly now and what is beautiful.” Watch the trailer below: READ FULL STORY

Matthew Weiner's 'Are You Here' is 'as twisted as real life' -- EXCLUSIVE POSTER

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Matthew Weiner has been working on Are You Here, an ode to and examination of what he calls the “myth of male friendship,” for over a decade. He started writing the film between his first two years at The Sopranos, just around the point in his life when he started looking around and wondering where all his friends had gone.

It took Weiner nearly eight years to get the script to Owen Wilson, two breaks from Mad Men to shoot it, and two more seasons to edit and finish the film. But after showcasing an in-progress cut at the 2013 Toronto Film Festival and making few more edits, a slight title change, and some finishing touches, Weiner is finally ready to take it to the public. Almost.

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Owen Wilson, Vince Vaughn play Quidditch behind the scenes of 'The Internship' -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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Every viewer, at one point or another, has asked the question, “What do movie stars do on set when they’re not filming?” We hear stories of pranks, or certain stars who head back to their trailer to nap. And then there’s Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson — who play Quidditch?

We have an exclusive video of Vaughn and Wilson behind the scenes of The Internship, enjoying a hot summer day with fellow cast members by playing the Harry Potter-inspired game. Surprisingly, Wilson wasn’t familiar with the game, but by the end of the day, “there was something about that game that just loved me,” Wilson explains in the video.

Watch the Quidditch match that resulted in one broken finger in our exclusive video below:
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Toronto 2013: Andre Benjamin plays Jimi Hendrix in a very novel biopic

I’m a sucker for biopics and always have been, but I understand why they’re often thought of as a second-rate form. In a sense, each one is trying to tell two stories at once: the chronicle of its subject’s artistic or political or whatever other worldly achievement (the thing that made us hungry to see a biopic about him or her in the first place), and, at the same time, the private, tumultuous “human drama” of it all. Given that these two dimensions can’t really be separated, and that you have to cram both of them into two hours, it’s amazing, when you think about it, that the best biopics, from Lenny (1974) to Kinsey (2004) to Malcolm X (1992) to Sweet Dreams (1985) to Milk (2008)  to Ed Wood (1994) to Ray (2004), are as rich and full and authentic as they are. Nevertheless, I think that the hyper scrutiny of the “reality” era, when the lives of celebrities (including dead ones) are more subject to exposure than ever before, has made us all a little suspect of the tidiness, the compressions, the convenient fictionalizations, the cut corners that are an essential element of almost any biopic. The good ones are told with more explicitness and authenticity than they used to be, but as a basic form, the biopic now seems cornier than ever. We can see through it, even as we’re hooked on it. READ FULL STORY

Toronto: Are there clues to the end of 'Mad Men' in Matthew Weiner's movie, 'You Are Here'?

“I’m going to miss f—ing you. I used to think there was more… but there’s not.”

On paper, this line of dialog reads like some crude kiss-off from Don Draper. But in You Are Here, Matthew Weiner’s feature-film directorial debut, it’s a wry kiss-off from Owen Wilson that elicits chuckles instead of gasps. Wilson plays Steve Dallas, a charming TV weatherman who’s getting by in the world with as little effort as possible. When his less successful childhood friend, Ben (Zach Galifianakis), turns to him for support after his estranged father dies, the two return to their rural Pennsylvania town for the funeral and to pick up the pieces with Ben’s sister, played by Amy Poehler.

Fans of Mad Men may or may not be surprised by the film’s more whimsical comic spin — after all, Weiner is the same guy whose idea of funny is driving a John Deere tractor over an executive’s foot at an office party. But long before Mad Men and writing for The Sopranos, Weiner worked on TV shows like Becker, with Ted Danson, and Andy Richter Controls the Universe. He penned the script for You Are Here when he was still writing for The Sopranos, and now that he’s a big powerful genius, things finally fell into place — if not immediately. “I wrote the movie for Owen Wilson and it took me eight years to even get the script to him,” Weiner said at Sunday’s screening of his film at the Toronto Film Festival, “which will tell you something about whether or not a hit TV show will help you.”

Jon Hamm read an early version of Weiner’s script and suggested Galifianakis — before his breakout role in The Hangover. When everyone’s schedules coincided in between seasons of Mad Men, Weiner grabbed the opportunity to direct his first Hollywood movieHe sat down with Entertainment Weekly to discuss You Are Here – which is in Toronto looking for a distributor — the helpful on-screen baggage of movie stars, and whether there are any clues in the movie that might indicate Don Draper’s fate. For the record, Wilson’s sly womanizer does not fall out of the window of a skyscraper or down an elevator shaft. READ FULL STORY

Casting Net: Owen Wilson in heist comedy; Plus 'Veronica Mars' casts another vet, more

• Owen Wilson is joining Jim Carrey in Relativity’s as-yet-untitled action heist comedy from Napoleon Dynamite director Jared Hess. The story focuses on an armored car driver who is pressured into helping steal $20 million and then left high and dry in Mexico. The driver is determined to get even. Lorne Michaels and John Goldwyn are producing. [Deadline]

• More in untitled news — Josh Gad (Book of Mormon) and Kevin Hart (Think Like a Man) will co-star in a romantic comedy from Screen Gems and Miramax about a best man-for-hire (Hart) who covers for the socially awkward (shocker!) Gad by providing a best man and a set of groomsmen for his nuptials. [THR]

• Producer Jason Blum already has the biggest movie out this week (The Purge) and just announced its sequel is in the works. But next up is the thriller Stretch and funnyman Ed Helms is in talks take a turn away from comedy by joining the cast of the film about a limo driver (Patrick Wilson) with a passenger from hell, played by Chris Pine. [THR]

• And finally, another announcement in the ongoing Veronica Mars saga. Series creator Rob Thomas announced in an email sent to Kickstarter backers Monday that Francis Capra will come back to play Eli “Weevil” Navarro in the film reboot of the cult TV show. “Playing a wrong-side-of-the-tracks-kid in a town full of privileged peers, Francis found a terrific — and difficult — balance between tough and soulful. I couldn’t be happier that he’ll be back with us for the film,” Thomas wrote.

Thomas also shared the video below from Capra:

PREVIOUSLY: Warner Bros. acquires ‘Rasputin’ pitch with Leonardo DiCaprio attached to star

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Box office report: 'The Purge' doubles the debut of 'The Internship' with $36.4 million

Many assumed that the weekend before the debut of Man of Steel would be a calm one at the box office, but that was not the case. Universal’s thriller The Purge surged into the top spot this weekend and shattered all expectations with a massive $36.4 million debut.

The film, produced by Paranormal Activity mastermind Jason Blum, cost only $3 million to make, and because its marketing campaign was predominantly digital (read: inexpensive), the micro-budgeted film will become a hugely profitable release for the currently on-fire Universal.

The Purge had an intriguing premise: for one night every year, all crime (including murder) is legal. Universal’s marketing team effectively communicated that twisted plot in trailers and ads, and the premise helped pack theaters, though it didn’t deliver on audiences’ high expectations. Crowds issued the film a discouraging “C” CinemaScore grade, and the film sank 38 percent from Friday to Saturday — a sign of poor word-of-mouth.

The Purge gave star Ethan Hawke his best opening weekend ever — trouncing Training Day‘s $22.6 million debut in 2001. Hawke also thrived on the indie circuit this weekend, as his film Before Midnight scored $585,000 from just 52 locations for an early $1.5 million total. Before Midnight‘s robust $11,243 per theater average trailed only one other film in the Top 20: The Purge, which had a sizzling $14,353 average at its 2,536 locations.

Universal reports that audiences for The Purge were quite diverse, with Hispanic moviegoers making up 33 percent of ticket buyers. Interestingly, the film also played predominantly to women, who accounted for 56 percent of the audience. READ FULL STORY

Box office update: 'The Purge' stuns on Friday with $16.7 million

The buzz around Universal’s Ethan Hawke thriller The Purge seemed like it was swelling heading into the weekend, but no one could have guessed that the film would over-perform the way it did yesterday.

The Purge earned an incredible $16.7 million on its first Friday (technically, that number includes Thursday night), and it’s headed to an opening-weekend gross of about $37 million, giving producer Jason Blum, the man behind the Paranormal Activity series, another runaway hit. The best part about all this for Universal? The Purge‘s budget was only $3 million.

It was a mixed bag of news for Fox’s Vince Vaughn/Owen Wilson comedy The Internship, which came in second. On the one hand, the film exceeded lowered expectations with $6.6 million on Friday, putting the $58 million movie on pace for an $18-19 million opening weekend. On the other hand, that’s a rather tepid result for the duo that helped Wedding Crashers climb to $209 million total back in 2005. Certainly not a disaster, though! READ FULL STORY

'Internship' costars Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn talk chemistry, Google, and why 'flops are more relaxing than hits'

Eight years after the $209 million-grossing smash hit Wedding Crashers, Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn are teaming up again — this time to crash Silicon Valley. In The Internship, opening June 7, the duo play two unemployed middle-aged friends who take a highly competitive internship at Google to try to reboot their stalled careers. We asked the two longtime friends to spill the secret to their enduring big-screen chemistry. READ FULL STORY

'The Internship' trailer: Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn face occupational hazards -- VIDEO

Eight years after Wedding Crashers, Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn have reunited for a new comedy that doubles as an extended commercial for Google.

The Internship has the duo playing Nick and Billy, a pair of down-on-their-luck salesmen who find themselves out of a job when their company shuts down. Desperate, they apply for and attain internships at Google — only to find themselves competing against a gaggle of brilliant 20-somethings for a handful of full-time positions. The Office‘s B.J. Novak, The Daily Show‘s Aasif Mandvi, and Bridesmaids‘s Rose Byrne co-star; Date Night‘s Shawn Levy directed. Watch the trailer — which premiered, appropriately, during a Google Plus hangout this afternoon — below.

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