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Tag: Penn Badgley (1-4 of 4)

Casting Net: Judy Greer headed for 'Tomorrowland'?; Plus, 'Gossip Girl' alum tries Shakespeare, more

• George Clooney and Judy Greer have been working together for over 14 years: First in 1999’s Three Kings, then in 2011’s The Descendents, and now, they may be re-teaming for Disney’s Tomorrowland. Directed by Brad Bird with a script from Damon Lindelof and EW’s own Jeff Jensen, the secretive project also stars Hugh Laurie and Britt Robinson. Greer has made a career of playing quirky character roles and best friend parts in romantic comedies since she broke out in 1999 with the dark comedy Jawbreaker and the aforementioned Three Kings. As for what’s next, Greer has a role in the Carrie update with Julianne Moore and Chloe Moretz, which hits theaters Oct. 18, and is currently filming Dawn of the Planet of the Apes. [Deadline]
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'Greetings from Tim Buckley': Penn Badgley wants to make sweet, sweet music -- VIDEO

Before Jeff Buckley covered that song that made you cry, he was just a twentysomething guy in New York with a guitar who looked an awful lot like Penn Badgley.

In Greetings from Tim Buckley, Badgley plays Jeff, the son of the eponymous musician, played in presumable flashback by Ben Rosenfield. Will Jeff play at a concert honoring his father and become a legend in his own right? Drama! With flashes of flirtation and sobbing against a wall. Take a look at the trailer — which hails Badgley in a break-out performance (I think he’s best in the train car, no?) — below.

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Casting Net: Penn Badgley signs on for drama 'Parts Per Billion.' Plus: Michael Shannon, Samantha Morton, Scott Bakula

Penn Badgley, on the heels of Gossip Girl ending and his musical starring role in Greetings From Tim Buckley, due out next year, has signed on for the drama Parts Per Billion, alongside Alexis Bledel, Hill Harper, and Teresa Palmer. Directed and written by Brian Horiuchi, the movie also stars Frank Langella, Gena Rowlands, Rosario Dawson, and Josh Hartnett, about three couples dealing with an event that could destroy their relationships. [Deadline]

• Michael Shannon (Boardwalk Empire, Take Shelter) and equably formidable Samantha Morton (John Carter, Control) have been cast as the leads in thriller The Harvest, directed by John McNaughton (Wild Things) from a script by Stephen Lancellotti. The movie follows the story of an in-control heart surgeon (Morton), whose retired husband (Shannon) cares for their ill son. The son befriends a 13-year-old neighbor, causing family dynamics to break down. Knowing the sheer intensity wild-eyed Shannon and serious Morton both pour into roles, this should be an electric pairing. [Deadline]

• Scott Bakula has joined the cast of Elsa and Fred — co-starring vets Shirley MacLaine and Christopher Plummer — as the banker son of a quirky woman (MacLaine) who becomes friends with a widower (Plummer). Michael Radford is directing from a script he co-wrote. Bakula has been making the TV rounds, from most recently recently Law & Order: SVU to HBO Liberace biopic Behind the Candelabra, due out next year. [Variety]

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Toronto Film Festival: As the fallen indie rock idol Jeff Buckley, Penn Badgley rocks it (and nails it) in 'Greetings from Tim Buckley,' a seductive piece of musical mumblecore

Even during his one brief moment in the sun, Jeff Buckley was the quietest of rock idols. He had the voice of an angel, and he would stretch that voice out, high and tremulous and almost unearthly in its delicacy, his rapid vibrato making him sound, at times, like a human theremin. When he sang a song like Nina Simone’s great “Lilac Wine,” he lingered on phrases and gave them an indulgent vocal caress, slowing the already slow song way, way down, as if he were trying to merge with each note, each phrase of soft despair. This wasn’t just singing — it was woozy, almost jazzy psychodrama. Yet Buckley did it with flair, and with so much sinuous sex appeal that he transformed indulgence into a new form of rock cool. READ FULL STORY

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