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Tag: Soundtrack (1-8 of 8)

Trent Reznor on 'Gone Girl': 'It's a nasty film'

Trent Reznor is currently on the road in Europe promoting Nine Inch Nails’ latest album Hesitation Marks, and he’ll be spending the bulk of his summer crossing North America with fellow ’94 survivors Soundgarden. But in between those gigs, he’s going to be wrapping up his biggest project of the year: the score for David Fincher’s Gone Girl, which hits theaters this fall.  READ FULL STORY

'Veronica Mars' soundtrack: Listen to a new take on 'We Used to Be Friends' -- EXCLUSIVE

A long time ago, we used to be friends…

Any true Marshmallow knows the rest of the words. The rousing 2003 Dandy Warhols tune “We Used to Be Friends” underscored the opening credits of Veronica Mars throughout its three seasons on the air. Even though it had a radio life outside of the show (it was even used on an episode of The O.C.!), the song belongs to Veronica Mars. Like all great theme songs, it has become indistinguishable from the show itself.

But Veronica and the rest of the gang have evolved in the past decade, and a new era in the world of our favorite sleuth warrants a new take on the song. On the eve of the movie’s debut (March 14), EW has an exclusive first listen to Alejandro Escovedo’s mature, soulful re-imagining of the Dandy Warhols’ peppy alt-anthem. READ FULL STORY

'Inside Llewyn Davis': Oscar Isaac, Marcus Mumford, and the Punch Brothers perform a song from the film -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

The star of the upcoming Coen brothers film Inside Llewyn Davis may be the dark, handsome, and somewhat mysterious  Oscar Isaac, but the soul of the film is its music — a folk-inspired soundtrack featuring some of the biggest names in music, including Justin Timberlake. Isaac is featured on several of the tracks, which he performs himself in the film as the titular down-on-his-luck songsmith Llewyn Davis. To celebrate the film, the producers staged a concert in New York with folk geniuses the Punch Brothers (literally — band leader Chris Thile won a MacArthur Genius Award in 2012) and filmed the event for an upcoming Showtime special. The Punch Brothers were joined by Isaac and Mumford & Sons frontman Marcus Mumford (who associate produced the soundtrack) on “Fare Thee Well,” which you can listen to in an exclusive clip below.

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'The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug': Listen to the soundtrack here -- EXCLUSIVE AUDIO

With every epic Peter Jackson film comes an epic soundtrack. And on Dec. 10, the soundtrack for The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug will hit shelves along with a special edition soundtrack featuring 12 extended tracks, a bonus track, expanded liner notes, and interactive sheet music. Many of you have probably already pre-ordered the album, and we have an exclusive sneak peek at what you’re getting into.

Featuring the music of Howard Shore, the soundtrack plays a key role in the highly anticipated film. In the liner notes for the soundtrack, Jackson writes: “Howard Shore – what can I say? His music soars and enriches way beyond its connection to our images. He truly has created an epic musical world of his own. A unique sound like no other. A year from now, we will be able to listen to well over 20 hours of musical story telling, that starts with An Unexpected Journey, and concludes with The Return of the King.  That is Howard’s genius – he is carefully shaping this 6 part epic score as a fully unified narrative. This is the second chapter.”

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'X-Men' trailer leans on Hans Zimmer's 'Thin Red Line' score, a.k.a. 'The Fassbender Suite'

Jim-Caviezel-The-Thin-Red-Line.jpg

Hans Zimmer has been composing classic Hollywood scores for 30 years, but you can practically pinpoint when he was handed the baton to become the Maestro. For more than a generation, John Williams, famous for Jaws, Star Wars, and Indiana Jones, was the artist who scored our dreams, but last July, Warner Bros. announced that it was retiring Williams’ iconic Superman theme. Instead, Zimmer — the composer behind The Dark Knight, Inception, and Gladiator — would provide the melody that a new generation of kids would hum while they pretend to fly around their backyards after seeing Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel.

An eight-time Oscar nominee — who won for The Lion King — Zimmer is best known for his collaborations with director Christopher Nolan, but the one track that seems to have made the longest-lasting impact is from Terrence Malick’s 1998 World War II movie, The Thin Red Line, in which Jim Caviezel is an oasis of serenity (above) within the hell-hole of war. Fifteen years later, “Journey to the Line” is a go-to tone-setter for the biggest and most ambitious Hollywood films. It accompanied the first footage of Man of Steel when Snyder reintroduced the character at Comic-Con 2012. The most recent trailer for X-Men: Days of Future Past pumps it up just as Wolverine screams in anguish, while Steve McQueen’s saga, 12 Years a Slave, leans heavily on the tune just after Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor) says, “I don’t want to survive. I want to live!”

Triumph. Tragedy. Serenity. Deep, profound emotional release. The music conveys it all, and could eke a single tear down your cheek even if it played over Grown Ups 3: Dookie in the Pool. Plus, the tune is evocative without being iconic. Not many people hear it in a trailer and go, “Cool, ‘Journey to the Line’ from The Thin Red Line!” Instead, they might think, “Whoa, this movie sounds intense and important. Why am I crying at naked, blue-skinned Jennifer Lawrence?”

With X-Men and 12 Years, Michael Fassbender certainly seems to be profiting from the soundtrack association. He’s already intense and important, but “Journey to the Line” has now played over three of his biggest recent films, including last year’s Shame. [Correction: Actually, the piece of music in the Shame trailer is a Zimmer soundalike from composer Harry Escott.] Maybe, as one of my colleagues suggested today, hearing “Journey to the Line” is simply how it feels to be Michael Fassbender every day…

Click below to hear “Journey to the Line” — or as some call it, “The Fassbender Suite” — in a few of its trailer incarnations:
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Julianne Moore gets her rock star on: Listen to the full soundtrack of 'What Maisie Knew'; Plus an exclusive clip

You’ve seen Julianne Moore play a lawyer, a housewife, a mother, and a post-apocalyptic survivor, but not until now have you seen her play a rock star.

For indie drama What Maisie Knew, Moore had to learn the swagger and the singing skills of a rocker. She plays Susanna, one half of the pair of negligent, self-involved parents of young Maisie (Onata Aprile). When Susanna and her art dealer husband (Steve Coogan) divorce, Maisie gets shuffled back and forth between the two of them, and soon her two new stepparents (Alexander Skarsgård and Joanna Vanderham) come to care for her more than her childish parents do.

Real-life rock group The Kills became Susanna’s band for the film. Moore sings with them for two songs on the soundtrack, “Night Train” and “Hook and Line.” READ FULL STORY

'The Hobbit' score: Howard Shore welcomes you back to Middle-earth -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

When fans of Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings trilogy return to Middle-earth for The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, the first of three films based on J.R.R. Tolkien’s earlier book, there will be plenty of familiar sights and sounds. Ian McKellen’s Gandalf plays a major role in this adventure, of course, and a few other favorite actors from LOTR return as well. But it’s the music that immediately washes over the audience like a warm blanket and reminds them that they’re “home” again. Composer Howard Shore, who won three Academy Awards for his work on the previous films, has weaved the now iconic “Concerning Hobbits” melody throughout the new film while expanding upon Middle-earth’s musical palette. “The Hobbit is a more gentle story than Lord of the Rings,” says Shore, in an exclusive video about the making of the film’s music, recorded by his wife, Elizabeth. “I always begin working with the book, the words, the most important thing.”

A lifelong Tolkien enthusiast, Shore revisits the books almost daily, and he often plotted the music as he read. That literary connection, in addition to his deep relationship with nature, helped create the musical fabric that has become so synonymous with Jackson’s films. “I just try to capture the spirit of each scene,” he explains.

Watch the clip below, which also shows him working with the London Philharmonic Orchestra at historic Abbey Road Studios. “More chaos,” he demands of his musicians at one point. “More, more terror. READ FULL STORY

'Breaking Dawn': Green Day's music video reveals new film footage -- VIDEO

Twilight fans are having a pretty great week. First, EW brought you an exclusive clip of Bella and Edward from their new cottage, and now, Green Day has released a music video for their song, “The Forgotten,” featured on the Breaking Dawn — Part 2 soundtrack.

The video is full of goodies from the film, including an extended look at red-eyed vampire Bella jumping over a waterfall and running, running, running through the forest with Edward. So much to do, so little time before the Volturi show up! There’s also a fair amount of Renesmee, including some shots of the whole new vampire family around the piano, and — most excitedly for fans — even a tease of big moments like when Bella gives Renesmee the locket.

Check out the music video below: READ FULL STORY

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