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Tag: Sports (1-10 of 30)

Brett Ratner acquires rights to Yasiel Puig biopic

Jesse Katz’s Los Angeles magazine story about breakout L.A. Dodgers star Yasiel Puig’s journey from Cuba to California is getting the movie treatment: Brett Ratner and his RatPac Entertainment nabbed the rights to turn the story — published only weeks ago — into a film.

Katz’s article chronicles Puig’s attempts to leave his home country of Cuba, including getting caught up in a Mexican drug cartel and being held captive by them for nearly three weeks. Now, Puig is a wildly successful Dodger with a seven-year contract. READ FULL STORY

Sports movies, by the numbers: Do football, baseball, or car racing films earn the most?

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When Draft Day hit theaters on April 11, it didn’t exactly set the box office on fire, earning under $10 million in its opening weekend. But the Kevin Costner starrer can take pride in one thing: When it comes to sports movies, football films are the all-time box office champs. READ FULL STORY

Knicks hoops documentary headlines Tribeca/ESPN Sports Film Festival

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The New York Knicks are one of basketball’s most storied franchises but they haven’t won an NBA title since 1973. Celebrity fans like Spike Lee, Woody Allen, and screenwriter William Goldman worshipped the star-studded — but team-first — Knicks teams of that championship era, and a generation of aging sportswriters refuse to let those hardwood legends die. Actor Michael Rapaport was only three years old when the Knicks won their last title, but he’s turned his yearning for those glory years into a documentary, When the Garden was Eden.

Rapaport’s movie, which is also part of ESPN’s “30 for 30″ series, headlines this year’s Tribeca/ESPN Sports Film Festival, and will be the program’s gala premiere on April 17. “As a native New Yorker and lifelong Knicks fan, it was an honor to explore the championship New York Knick teams,” Rapaport said in a statement. “Those players have been a part of my vocabulary since I was a child…Walt Frazier, Earl Monroe and Willis Reed are icons of New York City and it’s been a privilege to be a part of re-telling the Knicks story.”

Also premiering is Champs, which examines how the brutal sport pulled all-time greats, like Mike Tyson and Evander Holyfield, out of a life of crime and poverty.

Click below for the entire Tribeca/ESPN lineup, descriptions courtesy of the festival: READ FULL STORY

'Batman vs. Superman' brings superhero rivalry to the football field

The last time football was featured in a Batman movie, a pro stadium was being decimated by deadly explosions. But Gotham football fans are apparently resilient.

Tomorrow, in East Los Angeles, director Zack Snyder is filming scenes for Batman vs. Superman during a college football game between East Los Angeles College and Victor Valley College. Though the community colleges aren’t exactly the sort of traditional football factories that pop up on SportsCenter, the teams that will square off at halftime are comic-book powerhouses: Gotham City University versus Metropolis State University.

Batman-News.com even has the team’s uniforms (see above), with both squads wearing colors that reflect the styles of their hometown hero. Gotham City University’s black and gold unis even echo those of their ill-fated professional franchise, the Gotham City Rogues. Nicknames and mascots for the college teams haven’t been revealed, but can we get some support for the Gotham City Knights and the Metropolis State Crusaders?

Snyder plans to spend 20 minutes filming the two imaginary teams squaring off at the 20,000-capacity Weingart Stadium, which will stand in for Gotham’s home field. It’s safe to assume that the cities’ ultimate bragging rights in this upcoming blockbuster won’t be determined by what happens on the field — but it can’t hurt to deliver a blow for civic pride.

'The Armstrong Lie' trailer: Liar, liar, Lance on fire -- VIDEO

“I like to win,” Lance Armstrong says as the trailer for Oscar-winner Alex Gibney’s latest documentary begins. “But more than anything, I can’t stand the idea of losing. Because to me, that equals death.”

In 2009, Gibney began filming a new doc about Armstrong’s big “comeback year.” Though he knew that the beloved cyclist — famous for beating cancer, then winning the Tour de France seven consecutive times — had been accused of doping in the past, Gibney had no idea that those allegations would eventually be proven true. “He had lied to me, straight to my face,” Gibney says in the trailer. “When the truth came out, I told him he owed me an explanation.”

You’ll find that explanation in The Armstrong Lie, which charts Lance’s plummet from grace and includes an interview that will “finally set the record straight.” Get your popcorn ready; this looks like a must-see for anyone who loves a good rise-and-fall narrative.

READ FULL STORY

'My Left Foot' director Jim Sheridan to adapt WWII book 'Playing with the Enemy'

There are sports movies. There are war movies. Playing with the Enemy will be both, and it’s set to be directed by Jim Sheridan, who has worked in both genres before.

Sheridan will direct the film and re-write its script, EW has confirmed. Deadline first reported the news.

The film is an adaptation of the 2006 book Playing with the Enemy by Gary W. Moore, about his father, Gene Moore, who played for the Brooklyn Dodgers before joining the Navy in 1940. While stationed at a prisoner of war camp in Louisiana, he taught German POWs how to play baseball. READ FULL STORY

Ron Howard: 'Rush' revved up NASA memories, 'Backdraft' fears -- EXCLUSIVE FIRST LOOK

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The year, make, and model were quite different but Rush filmmaker Ron Howard has felt the rumbling power of iconic cars when it comes to engines of cinema and symbolism. It was 40 years ago this summer that one of the ultimate automobile movies, American Graffiti, rumbled into box office history and steered Howard toward television and Happy Days.

Howard is a two-time Oscar-winning filmmaker and with Rush (featured in the first-look poster above with star Chris Hemsworth) and its fact-based tale of Formula One racing rivalry in 1976 he found himself feeling like he was covering some familiar road — but it wasn’t films about wheels on asphalt that hit close to home.

“People ask what has Rush been like and I say from a filmmaking standpoint it’s been kind of like a cross between Apollo 13 and Backdraft,” says Howard, who other films include The DaVinci Code, Splash and A Beautiful Mind. “In the case of Apollo 13, that’s for the complexity and the authenticity and the intent to capture an era and an endeavor that blends technology, action and danger.”

READ FULL STORY

The biggest baseball movie ever? How '42's opening weekend stacks up

When 42 surpassed expectations and won the most recent weekend box office, virtually every day-after industry analysis included some mention that the Jackie Robinson movie recorded the biggest and best opening weekend of any baseball movie ever. But before we give 42 a high-five as it rounds third and heads off to the box-office Hall of Fame, it’s always nice to be reminded that “biggest and best” is a skewed metric when it comes to the modern box office. Was 42‘s $27.5 million opening-weekend take a larger numerical figure than that of Bull Durham, The Natural, or Field of Dreams? Yes, it was. By a lot, actually. But then the price of a movie ticket is much higher today than it was then, isn’t it? You don’t need to look any further than the baseball movie that previously held the opening-weekend record to realize how limited such bromides really are. Remember The Benchwarmers? That 2006 movie with Rob Schneider and Jon Heder was the previous box-office MVP, with a $19.7 million opening weekend. Not exactly Pride of the Yankees.

Don’t get me wrong, 42 still had a great debut. But I wonder how it really stacks up against the biggest and best baseball movies in recent memory, taking inflation and theater count into consideration. (A “wide release” in 1984 reached only a fraction of the number of theaters one does in 2013.) The number-crunchers at BoxOfficeMojo are amazing, but their online archives only go back to 1980. So we’ll have to just assume that Pride of the Yankees and original The Bad News Bears would rank at or near the top of the list, which ranks the Top 10 baseball movies by adjusted per-screen average. READ FULL STORY

The nasty curveball of '42': Alan Tudyk puts an unexpected face on racism

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Fans of Suburgatory and Firefly know actor Alan Tudyk as the actor with an open face and daft smile while the audiences that saw I, Robot remember the humanity he invested in a character of man-made machinery. This weekend, however, the audiences that sat down in the dark for the Jackie Robinson biopic 42 saw a startling new aspect of the 42-year-old actor’s craft. Playing Philadelphia Phillies manager Ben Chapman, who more than any other character in the film embodies the angry face and venomous voice of mid-century racism in America, Tudyk taunts Robinson (newcomer Chadwick Boseman) with a relentless geyser of vile and humiliating epithets.

“The way Brian saw this role and the reason he wanted me in the role [was] he didn’t want a straight-up villain,” says Tudyk, who has been good friends with writer/director Brian Helgeland since working together on the medieval adventure A Knights Tale. “He didn’t want the kind of the guy that everybody sees come on screen and the minute they see him they say, ‘Oh, I hate this guy.’ He wanted somebody that might be funny. If you read up on it and go back, the people who knew Ben Chapman really liked him, they thought he was a good guy. He wasn’t viewed as a villain. When he comes up out of the dugout and yells all these insults, there’s a lot of it that he’s doing to entertain his players and it has this schoolyard quality to it: ‘You doing a little dance for us, ‘Jangles? You can do it, can’t you? You can dance, you got rhythm.’” READ FULL STORY

'Invincible' director Ericson Core to helm 'Point Break' remake

Things are starting to move along for the remake of Kathryn Bigelow’s Point Break that was first announced in September 2011. Alcon Entertainment announced Wednesday that Ericson Core will direct the project.

Core got his start in cinematography, serving as the director of photography for films like The Fast and the Furious and Daredevil. His feature directorial debut was 2006 football film Invincible, which starred Mark Wahlberg. READ FULL STORY

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