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Tag: Sundance 2014 (1-10 of 69)

'Obvious Child' trailer: Jenny Slate hits rock bottom in Brooklyn -- VIDEO

Jenny Slate’s Donna Stern is having a rough time. She’s a 27-year-old struggling stand-up comedian. Her boyfriend cheated on her with her best friend. She’s resorted to stalking him in her desperation. And she’s just found out she’s pregnant from a one night stand, and the only date available for an abortion happens to be Valentine’s Day.

Written and directed by Gillian Robespierre, Obvious Child premiered at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival and co-stars Jake Lacy (as the possibly too nice one night stand), Gaby Hoffman (as Donna’s supportive, manic friend), and David Cross (as a fellow stand-up).

Check out the first trailer after the jump and watch as Donna goes on a drunken rant on stage, pees in public, and generally tries to get through the mess of being a twenty-something with the help of a little wry humor.

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John Slattery on 'Mad Men,' Philip Seymour Hoffman, and 'God's Pocket' -- EXCLUSIVE POSTER

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John Slattery thought the Mad Men pilot was brilliant, but it wasn’t until the show was well into its first season that he began to realize that he might be part of something truly great. “You shoot the thing very quickly, so it’s about a week-and-half and then you’re onto another story and then another,” says the actor. “I think it was Elisabeth Moss that I asked, ‘Is it me or do these scripts keep getting better?’ Week to week, with a rushed schedule, this thing just kept getting better and better and better — and year after year, I think it got better. I’ve never seen any show do that.”

Like Roger Sterling, Slattery has evolved during his six-plus seasons on Mad Men. He’s directed five episodes, including the Bobby Kennedy assassination episode “Man With a Plan.” The experience gave him the confidence to direct his first feature, God’s Pocket, based on the Pete Dexter novel about a Philadelphia man caught between a rock and hard place when he has to dispose of his crazy stepson’s body after a construction-site “accident” — without his wife knowing the truth. “Mickey I found a very endearing character,” says Slattery. “A guy who doesn’t feel sorry for himself, who doesn’t have the easiest row to hoe. And just tries to do the right thing for his wife, and can’t seem to get it to go his way.” READ FULL STORY

Richard Linklater's 'Boyhood' gets summer release date

Richard Linklater’s Boyhood, a movie 12 years in the making, will open in theaters on July 11.

Back in 2002, Linklater had the idea to make a movie about childhood — but rather than telling a story about a singular moment or chapter from growing up, he decided to cast a 6-year-old (Ellar Coltrane) and film him a little bit every year until he went to college. Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette play the boy’s parents, and Linklater’s daughter, Lorelei, plays the boy’s sister.

IFC Films agreed to produce and distribute the film at the outset, and their faith was rewarded when Linklater’s daring, unconventional film wowed audiences at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival. The film went to receive more accolades at the Berlin Film Festival and SXSW.

Felicity Jones in 'Breathe In': Wise beyond her years -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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The last time Felicity Jones played a British exchange student, hearts were broken in Like Crazy, the bittersweet 2011 indie romance that won her a special acting prize at the Sundance Film Festival. In Breathe In, another Sundance movie from Like Crazy director Drake Doremus, Jones plays another British exchange student who falls in love with an American. But this tale is much darker and more complex.

Jones plays a piano prodigy named Sophie who comes to America to experience the thrills of New York. Her host family, however, lives in upstate New York, far away from the bright lights and excitement. The doldrums of suburban life are broken when she forms a deep connection with the married man of the house (Guy Pearce), a high-school music teacher whose dreams of playing in an elite orchestra are no longer encouraged by his wife (Amy Ryan). What starts as a shared passion blooms into something more dangerous that threatens all the characters’ well-being and sense of identity.

The movie premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 2013 and opens in theaters this Friday, March 28. Click below for an exclusive video from the film and a chat with Jones.

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'Frank' trailer: Michael Fassbender covers up with giant, fake head -- VIDEO

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Michael Fassbender plays a musical genius who can’t seem to face life “face on” in the film Frank.

The offbeat comedy directed by Lenny Abrahamson premiered at this year’s Sundance Film Festival and tells the story of the avant-garde pop band led by the mysterious and enigmatic Frank (Fassbender) as they travel to perform at the South by Southwest Festival in Texas. Domhnall Gleeson and Maggie Gyllenhaal star as Frank’s bandmates. The story, written by Jon Ronson (The Men Who Stare At Goats) and Peter Straughan (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy), is loosely inspired by Frank Sidebottom, the persona of cult musician and comedy legend Chris Sievey, as well as other outsider musicians like Daniel Johnston and Captain Beefheart.

The film will be released in the U.K. May 9, with a domestic release planned for later this year. Watch the trailer below: READ FULL STORY

Kristen Stewart's Sundance movie, 'Camp X-Ray,' lands a distributor

The Kristen Stewart-in-Gitmo movie that premiered at the Sundance Film Festival has landed a distributor. IFC Films announced today that it had acquired the North American rights to the film, which tells the story of a friendship that develops between a lonely military guard (Stewart) and a detainee (A Separation‘s Payman Maadi) at the notorious prison for suspected terrorists in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Written and directed by first-time feature filmmaker Peter Sattler, the film received mixed reviews at the Utah festival.

“Peter Sattler has made a stirring, sensitive and thought-provoking film that features two powerhouse performances by Payman Maadi and Kristen Stewart,” said Jonathan Sehring, president of Sundance Selects/IFC Films, in a statement. “Maadi proves once again that he is a force to be reckoned with and Stewart undoubtedly gives the best and most moving performance of her already remarkable career.”

Gravitas picks up Sundance retro charmer 'Ping Pong Summer'

Another Sundance premiere will be seeing the theatrical light of day. Director Michael Tully’s coming-of-age comedy Ping Pong Summer was acquired by Gravitas Ventures who announced a tentative early summer theatrical and VOD release Monday.

“Anyone (i.e. me) who spent lonely teenage summers dreaming of rapping, breakdancing or even (gasp!) talking to a girl is going to love this movie. Plus, where else are you going to see Susan Sarandon wield a fish like a weapon?” Gravitas VP Dustin Smith said in the announcement.

Featuring Sarandon, Amy Sedaris, Judah Friedlander, and Lea Thompson, Ping Pong Summer is “set in ‘present day’ 1985,” Tully told EW’s Anthony Breznican at Sundance. “We tried to make a movie that was like an artifact — it wasn’t looking back on the ’80s. We tried to make a movie that felt like it was from the ’80s.”

Check out the rest of their interview below.

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Philip Seymour Hoffman talks Sundance, directing in one of his final interviews -- VIDEO

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Philip Seymour Hoffman was at the Sundance Film Festival less than two weeks ago to talk about his role in John Slattery’s directorial debut, God’s Pocket. He spoke with EW’s Anthony Breznican along with Slattery and co-star Christina Hendricks (Mad Men). Hoffman had his first film as director — Jack Goes Boating — premiere at Sundance in 2010, and he only had this bit of advice for Slattery: “When you get here, it’s the letting go time.”

Watch the video from Sundance below and check out previous interviews with the Oscar winner from EW about some of his earlier films, including Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead, Charlie Wilson’s War, and A Most Wanted Man.

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Sundance 2014: 'Whiplash' takes home Grand Jury and Audience Awards

Whiplash, director Damien Chazelle’s story of a young jazz drummer, took home both the U.S. Grand Jury and Audience Dramatic awards at the Sundance Film Festival awards Saturday night. The film grew out of a short from Chazelle that won the Short Film Jury Award at Sundance in 2013.

Rich Hill, a story about a community in rural Missouri, won the U.S. Documentary Grand Jury award and Alive Inside: A Story of Music & Memory, about how music can help dementia patients, won the U.S. Audience Documentary award. Co-screenwriters Craig Johnson and Mark Heyman were honored with the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award for The Skeleton Twins, starring Bill Hader and Kristen Wiig. Cutter Hodierne won the U.S. Dramatic Award for Direction for Fishing Without Nets, his first feature film. The Prop 8 documentary The Case Against 8 brought home the U.S. Documentary Award for Direction for directors Ryan White and Ben Cotner. The Angelina Jolie-produced film about Ethiopia, Difret, won the Audience Award in the World Dramatic Competition.

Husband and wife hosts Nick Offerman and Megan Mullally brought the sexual innuendo and a ukulele to the ceremony in Park City, Utah, where this year’s crop of 186 independent films were celebrated. Presenters included Felicity Huffman, William H. Macy, Tracy Chapman, and film critic Leonard Maltin.

Check out the full list of winner’s below. You can also watch the replay of the awards ceremony, which streamed live on YouTube.
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Sundance at 30: Robert Redford opens up about the festival and his upcoming projects -- EXCLUSIVE

When Robert Redford set out to create a place for independent filmmakers to show their wares 30 years ago, he didn’t know it would become the behemoth star-filled event that is Sundance today. Coming to the festival for the first time this year, I had my own preconceived notions and thought, like many people, that Sundance has gotten too big, too commercial. But even with the fancy parties and the major movie stars strolling down Main Street, I was still blown away by the wealth of new and groundbreaking films at my fingertips this week. While Redford acknowledges that the marketers and the glitz have taken something away from the festival’s roots, he is still able to see it through a first-timer’s eyes, and says that there is opportunity in its success – and that this might just be the best year yet.

“When we started this process back 30 years ago, when I had the idea for the festival and to put it in Park City, I thought it’d be a good idea to maybe make it a little weird because maybe that would attract people,” Redford says. “We just sort of went along and tried to stay true to our core beliefs about who we were, what our mission was in terms of providing a platform for new filmmakers to have a place where their voices could be seen. And at the beginning, there were a lot of people who saw this as kind of a crazy thing. I would have to go on the stage at the opening of the festival and sort of explain who we were, what we were trying to do, but now the nice thing is we don’t have to explain anything—we just are and I think people understand what we are.”

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