Inside Movies Breaking Movie News and Scoops | Movie Reviews

Tag: Sundance Film Festival (31-40 of 431)

Sundance 2014: Kurt Russell and nephews on 'The Battered Bastards of Baseball'

kurt-russell-05

Kurt Russell and his nephews, Chapman and Maclain Way, sat down with EW’s Nicole Sperling to talk about the family history behind their sports documentary. Watch the video below: READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: William H. Macy, Billy Crudup and Selena Gomez talk 'Rudderless' -- VIDEO

rudderless.jpg

William H. Macy’s directorial debut Rudderless stars Billy Crudup as a father grieving after the death of his son and Selena Gomez as the son’s girlfriend. The three sat down with EW’s Sara Vilkomerson to talk about the making of the film and its music. Watch the video below: READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Elle Fanning, Glenn Close on 'Low Down' -- VIDEO

low-down.jpg

Director Jeff Preiss’ Low Down is based on Amy Albany’s memoir about growing up in LA with a single, troubled dad who was involved in the 1970s jazz scene. The two, along with Elle Fanning, Glenn Close, Flea, and Tim Daly, chatted with EW’s Nicole Sperling about the personal nature of the film and what working with Albany on set was like. Watch the clip below: READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: 'What We Do in the Shadows' follows vampire roommates -- VIDEO

what-we-do-in-the-shadows

It’s hard to imagine a world pre-Twilight. But it was before vampires were known as sparkly that writer/directors Jemaine Clement and Taika Waititi dreamt up their latest project: a “documentary” crew following around a house of vampire roommates (er…flatmates).

EW’s Lindsey Bahr gets the full story about What We Do in the Shadows at EW’s video lounge at the Sundance Film Festival: READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Shailene Woodley talks 'White Bird in a Blizzard' -- VIDEO

White-Bird

As if she wasn’t already busy enough, Shailene Woodley and the rest of the cast of White Bird in a Blizzard stopped by EW’s video studio at the Sundance Film Festival to talk about their new thriller.

Watch below as EW’s Sara Vilkomerson discusses the film with the cast as well as director Gregg Araki and finds out why the 1988 setting is so important. Here’s a hint: Killer music. READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Lindsay Lohan announces new film

With a film crew capturing every moment, Lindsay Lohan made a high-profile debut at the Sundance Film Festival, announcing a new film and a “fresh start.”

The 27-year-old, who is attempting a comeback after well-documented battles with drugs and legal troubles, came to the independent cinema showcase Monday to say she will produce and star in a film called Inconceivable, set to start shooting in March. READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Roger Ebert makes an enthralling documentary subject in 'Life Itself'

The first time we hear Roger Ebert talk in Life Itself, a deeply enthralling documentary about the late film critic who changed film criticism, he’s giving a speech (which he did quite often — sometimes, I can testify, when he was just standing in a room with you), and he observes that every one of us is more or less trapped inside the person we are. It is therefore our job, says Ebert, to attempt to understand who other people are; that’s basically the premise of civilization. And that, for Ebert, is where movies come in. Movies, he says, are “a machine that generates empathy,” and that’s just about as perfect an evocation of the primal appeal of movies as I have ever heard. It’s also a great example of why Roger Ebert was such a compelling writer, thinker, talker, and human being. It didn’t even matter whether you agreed with him — he had a way of putting things that was pithy and practical and philosophical all at the same time. He stopped drinking in 1979, but the easy, flowing panache of the barroom raconteur never left him. His thoughts, and the way that he expressed them, were catchy, infectious, contagious. Even when you did disagree with him (which, in my case, was often), the way he put things created a logic of enchantingly fused thought and passion. READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Richard Linklater unveils 'Boyhood,' a movie 12 years in the making

It took 39 days for Richard Linklater to make Boyhood. Well, actually, to be more precise, it took him 39 shooting days, spread across 12 years — more than 4,000 days — to complete the ambitious cinematic experiment, which follows a boy and his complicated, constantly evolving family as he grows up. Linklater cast Ellar Coltrane as young Mason when he was only 6 years old, and began shooting in 2002. Every year after, the cast — which includes Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette as Mason’s divorced parents and Linklater’s daughter, Lorelei, as Mason’s sister, Samantha — would reunite for three or four days to film a new chapter in the life of a boy. The finished result — a fluid 12-year odyssey compressed into 164 minutes — premiered last night at the Sundance Film Festival, and critics were quick to heap praise on the filmmaker and the cast.

Linklater had just finished making Waking Life and Tape in 2001 when he sat down to write a film about childhood. But he was stymied by the cinematic limitations of relying on a singular time or event to express all his themes and ideas. “I didn’t really have enough to say about one moment,” he said last night, during a post-screening Q&A. “And so I just got this ‘Eureka’ moment of like, ‘Well, why couldn’t we just shoot a little bit and encompass all of it?’ so that was the idea.”

He pitched the idea to Hawke, his frequent collaborator, before they’d even decided to reunite for Before Sunset, the second in their Before trilogy with Julie Delpy. “We were just sitting at a little cafe in New York, and he got this weird look on his face and said, ‘That’s like the craziest idea… but yeah, I’m in.'” READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Ryan Reynolds does not like cats, especially the one that tells him to kill in 'The Voices'

Iranian filmmaker Marjane Satrapi is known best for Persepolis, the award-winning 2007 animated film based on her own graphic novel about growing up during Iran’s Islamic Revolution. But she’s turned that reputation upside down with the Sundance film The Voices, a twisted, disturbing horror-comedy that stars Ryan Reynolds as Jerry, a man with few friends — but two talking pets. During the day, Jerry is the sweet but slightly-off warehouse worker who catches the eyes of the office girls at a bathroom factory in a small blue-collar town called Milton. At night, he comes home to discuss his life with Bosco, his loyal bull mastiff, and Mr. Whiskers, a brogue-accented tabby who fans the flames of Jerry’s darker urges. When Jerry sorta accidentally-on-purpose kills one of his pretty co-workers, he finds it difficult to cap those tendencies, and before long, his apartment is full of body parts packed neatly in Tupperwear and a fridge full of severed heads.

Um, what gives, Marjane?

“When first I read the script and I said to my producer, ‘We are not going to do any gore,'” the director said on Sunday after the film’s world premiere in Utah. “I don’t like blood. No way I’m going to do this kind of stuff. Then there was that first scene where there’s blood all over [Gemma Arterton] and I was like, ‘More blood! More blood!’ And I realized actually that I really liked that. I showed my mom a version of the movie, and she told me, ‘You’re completely sick in your brain.'” READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Richard Linklater's entrancing 'Boyhood' captures the Zen of growing up

Richard Linklater’s Boyhood, which premiered at Sundance last night, is an entrancing, one-of-a-kind act of dramatic storytelling: a beautiful stunt of a movie. It was shot over a period of 12 years, beginning in 2002, and it takes two hours and 40 minutes to tell the story of a boy named Mason as he grows up in Texas. The hook of the movie — and if it is a stunt, it’s a visionary one — is that Mason is played throughout by a young actor named Ellar Coltrane, who we literally watch grow up, year after year, on camera. That makes the film a kind of cousin to Michael Apted’s series of Up documentaries, but I’m not sure if this sort of thing has ever been attempted in a work of cinematic fiction before.

Linklater, of course, is a storyteller who reveres the art of naturalism, and Boyhood, though it’s a genuine movie, full of bustlingly staged scenes and performances and motifs and arcs, has the feel of a staged documentary about a fictional character. It’s lively and boisterous and very entertaining to watch, because stuff keeps happening, but the film also rolls forward in an almost Zen manner, so that everything that occurs — an angry family dinner, a camping trip, a haircut, an afternoon of videogames — carries the same wide-eyed, you are here significance. The film has that deadpan Linklater tone of slacker haphazardness, but you could also say that it’s almost Joycean in its appreciation of the scruffy magic of everyday life. READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Movies

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP