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Tag: Sundance Film Festival (31-40 of 424)

Sundance 2014: Richard Linklater unveils 'Boyhood,' a movie 12 years in the making

It took 39 days for Richard Linklater to make Boyhood. Well, actually, to be more precise, it took him 39 shooting days, spread across 12 years — more than 4,000 days — to complete the ambitious cinematic experiment, which follows a boy and his complicated, constantly evolving family as he grows up. Linklater cast Ellar Coltrane as young Mason when he was only 6 years old, and began shooting in 2002. Every year after, the cast — which includes Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette as Mason’s divorced parents and Linklater’s daughter, Lorelei, as Mason’s sister, Samantha — would reunite for three or four days to film a new chapter in the life of a boy. The finished result — a fluid 12-year odyssey compressed into 164 minutes — premiered last night at the Sundance Film Festival, and critics were quick to heap praise on the filmmaker and the cast.

Linklater had just finished making Waking Life and Tape in 2001 when he sat down to write a film about childhood. But he was stymied by the cinematic limitations of relying on a singular time or event to express all his themes and ideas. “I didn’t really have enough to say about one moment,” he said last night, during a post-screening Q&A. “And so I just got this ‘Eureka’ moment of like, ‘Well, why couldn’t we just shoot a little bit and encompass all of it?’ so that was the idea.”

He pitched the idea to Hawke, his frequent collaborator, before they’d even decided to reunite for Before Sunset, the second in their Before trilogy with Julie Delpy. “We were just sitting at a little cafe in New York, and he got this weird look on his face and said, ‘That’s like the craziest idea… but yeah, I’m in.'” READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Ryan Reynolds does not like cats, especially the one that tells him to kill in 'The Voices'

Iranian filmmaker Marjane Satrapi is known best for Persepolis, the award-winning 2007 animated film based on her own graphic novel about growing up during Iran’s Islamic Revolution. But she’s turned that reputation upside down with the Sundance film The Voices, a twisted, disturbing horror-comedy that stars Ryan Reynolds as Jerry, a man with few friends — but two talking pets. During the day, Jerry is the sweet but slightly-off warehouse worker who catches the eyes of the office girls at a bathroom factory in a small blue-collar town called Milton. At night, he comes home to discuss his life with Bosco, his loyal bull mastiff, and Mr. Whiskers, a brogue-accented tabby who fans the flames of Jerry’s darker urges. When Jerry sorta accidentally-on-purpose kills one of his pretty co-workers, he finds it difficult to cap those tendencies, and before long, his apartment is full of body parts packed neatly in Tupperwear and a fridge full of severed heads.

Um, what gives, Marjane?

“When first I read the script and I said to my producer, ‘We are not going to do any gore,'” the director said on Sunday after the film’s world premiere in Utah. “I don’t like blood. No way I’m going to do this kind of stuff. Then there was that first scene where there’s blood all over [Gemma Arterton] and I was like, ‘More blood! More blood!’ And I realized actually that I really liked that. I showed my mom a version of the movie, and she told me, ‘You’re completely sick in your brain.'” READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Richard Linklater's entrancing 'Boyhood' captures the Zen of growing up

Richard Linklater’s Boyhood, which premiered at Sundance last night, is an entrancing, one-of-a-kind act of dramatic storytelling: a beautiful stunt of a movie. It was shot over a period of 12 years, beginning in 2002, and it takes two hours and 40 minutes to tell the story of a boy named Mason as he grows up in Texas. The hook of the movie — and if it is a stunt, it’s a visionary one — is that Mason is played throughout by a young actor named Ellar Coltrane, who we literally watch grow up, year after year, on camera. That makes the film a kind of cousin to Michael Apted’s series of Up documentaries, but I’m not sure if this sort of thing has ever been attempted in a work of cinematic fiction before.

Linklater, of course, is a storyteller who reveres the art of naturalism, and Boyhood, though it’s a genuine movie, full of bustlingly staged scenes and performances and motifs and arcs, has the feel of a staged documentary about a fictional character. It’s lively and boisterous and very entertaining to watch, because stuff keeps happening, but the film also rolls forward in an almost Zen manner, so that everything that occurs — an angry family dinner, a camping trip, a haircut, an afternoon of videogames — carries the same wide-eyed, you are here significance. The film has that deadpan Linklater tone of slacker haphazardness, but you could also say that it’s almost Joycean in its appreciation of the scruffy magic of everyday life. READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Mark Ruffalo and Zoe Saldana talk 'Infinitely Polar Bear' -- VIDEO

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EW’s Sara Vilkomerson sat down with Infinitely Polar Bear stars Mark Ruffalo and Zoe Saldana, as well as writer/director Maya Forbes, to talk about the film at Sundance.

Check out the video below! READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Kristen Wiig and Bill Hader are fantastic in 'The Skeleton Twins'

Going in to the first Sundance showing of The Skeleton Twins, in which Kristen Wiig and Bill Hader play a troubled sister and brother coping with the legacy of their screwed-up family, I knew nothing about the film except that it was being billed as the movie that reunited the two former SNL teammates but wasn’t a comedy. Glancing at that photo above, I thought to myself: Hmmmmm, I hope it’s not one of those glum dysfunctional-family indie specials in which gifted comedians blank themselves out for the sake of art. I needn’t have worried. The Skeletons Twins is very much a drama, but it has lots of laughs, too — the kind of good, soul-ticking laughs that emerge, organically, from dramatic situations. Its tone is comparable to that of The Kids Are All Right or Alexander Payne’s films. The Golden Globes would have no problem nominating The Skeleton Twins in the Best Comedy or Musical category. Yet as directed and co-written by Craig Johnson, this is a tenderly sincere, and smart, and beguiling, and penetrating movie about the way that ordinary messed-up people can wind up stumbling through their lives. And let me say right up front: The two actors are fantastic together, every bit as powerful as Laura Linney and Mark Ruffalo were as the woundedly bound siblings of You Can Count on Me. But then, we already know from Bridesmaids what a knockout of a leading lady Kristen Wiig can be. It’s Bill Hader who’s the revelation. I think he could become a major screen actor. READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Sam Rockwell channels 'Star Wars' for 'Laggies' -- VIDEO

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In director Lynn Shelton’s Sundance film Laggies, Keira Knightley’s character Megan is having a quarter-life crisis until she meets Annika (Chloe Grace Moretz) and her dad Craig (Sam Rockwell).

So what does Star Wars have to do with all this? We’ll let Rockwell, Moretz, and Shelton explain it, in this Sundance interview with EW’s Sara Vilkomerson:
READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Zach Braff returns with 'Garden State' follow-up, gets standing ovation

Ten years after Garden State became a breakout hit — and the unofficial soundtrack — of the 2004 Sundance Film Festival, Zach Braff returned to Park City yesterday with his long-awaited, Kickstarter-financed follow-up, Wish I Was Here. Braff said when he made Garden State that he “just wanted to write a movie that describes how I felt about being 28 in 2004.” With Wish I Was Here, which he co-wrote with his brother Adam, he’s taken a similar approach. He plays a struggling commercial actor whose judgmental, conservative Jewish father (Mandy Patinkin) is dying of cancer. When he and his overburdened working wife (Kate Hudson) can no longer afford tuition for their two children’s private school, he decides to home-school them in an unconventional way while clinging to hopes for a resurgence in his acting career.

Garden State was all the things me and my [20-something] friends were obsessing about and talking about and worrying about, and I put it into a movie,” Braff told the audience after the film’s premiere. “And with this, my brother and I were sharing the things that we’re talking about. He’s got two young children. What are the things he’s wrestling with in teaching them. And with me, it’s my own spirituality. I find the films that I love the most — as a film lover — are the ones that are someone’s unique story. This isn’t a film that anyone else could’ve directed, or something that got passed around and got eventually made. No one else could tell this story that my brother and I wrote.”

READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Dane DeHaan finds 'Life After Beth' a tad unsettling -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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When you lose someone special, it’s rather common to feel severe pangs of regret. Regret that you held back, that you never told that person how you really felt when they were still alive. If only you could go back — or if they could come back — for just one more day or even one last moment together.

In Life After Beth, which premieres on Jan. 19 at the Sundance Film Festival, Zach (Dane DeHaan) gets that opportunity. His dead girlfriend (Aubrey Plaza) has been miraculously resurrected and she has no memory of her recent demise. She looks as fresh and pure as a minister’s daughter on Sunday, but Zach isn’t yet ready to praise Jesus. After all, one person’s “resurrected” is another person’s, um, zombie.

In this exclusive video from the horror-comedy, Beth’s parents (John C. Reilly and Molly Shannon) deem that contradiction a minor semantic quibble. For Zach, he’s stuck in the rarely diagnosed stage of grief some medical professionals describe as Freaked Out. READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: 'Love is Strange' cast at the festival -- VIDEO

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EW’s Anthony Breznican chats with the cast of Love is Strange at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival, about the film that follows a gay couple — Alfred Molina and John Lithgow — whose marriage causes Molina’s character George to lose his job. Watch the view below: READ FULL STORY

'Frank' star Maggie Gyllenhaal joins Michael Fassbender's head at EW Sundance Lounge

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Director Lenny Abrahamson and his stars Maggie Gyllenhaal and Scoot McNairy came by EW’s Sundance Lounge Saturday to talk about their movie Frank, which also stars Michael Fassbender as a musical genius… wearing a giant ceramic head… the entire film.

Fassbender himself couldn’t make it, but we did get to spend time with the head. Check out the video interview below. READ FULL STORY

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